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The use of a Gravity Geometric vs. Luminosity to measure distant Objects


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I finally found another Gravity Wave Measurement measured against the diameter of the proton.  The first gravity wave found was (GW150914) measured at a 10,000th of the diameter of a proton.  It had a spin of -.01 and so in my python code it would be a 1 spin. I should explain Luminosity Distance, it is an approximation in the linear direction because light bends around massive objects on its way from deep space to the measuring point.  At some junctures light can bend greater than other junctures, because of mass differences and this is why its an approximation for very deep objects.  Often times Luminosity will be printed like this:
5300+2400−2600.  

So to find the total light years.  You would multiply 1,000,000*3.26*(5300+(2400-2600))light years

Quote

Five years ago the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected a ripple in spacetime that was just one ten-thousandth the width of a proton
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/tiny-gravitational-wave-detector-could-search-anywhere-in-the-sky/


 

As I desperately searched the net to see if my Gravity Geometric was correct; I finally stumbled on to an article regarding the gravity wave (GW190521) measured at a 1,000,000th of the diameter of a proton.  I then looked at the spin for the GW190521 and it was an .08 and so in my python code it would be an 8 spin which also plays a role in the calculation.

Quote

Then, on 21 May 2019, those waves passed through our planet. Did you feel it? Probably not; the expansion and contraction of space would've stretched you less than a millionth of the diameter of a proton.
https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/the-biggest-black-hole-merger-ever-detected-rocked-the-universe-and-left-behind-a-mystery


 

This was great that I found two measurements to test my Gravity Geometric to see how it faired against the approximate luminosity distance measuring stick.  And just as I imagined at greater distances than smaller Luminosity as an approximation increases with time, because light bends around other massive objects on its way to where its being measured.  On the other hand gravity takes a straight path to the target being measured unhindered by mass.  So this is why I'm so excited to show the result.  I'm not using Luminosity to show distance and perhaps as I just discussed light not being accurate, that I'm spot on for light years with my Geometric Result.  

Here are the two Measurements and the Python Code

When using my python code you input:

Enter Number to divide Proton: 10000
Spin Number: 1
Enter number of Parsec's for Luminosity Distance: 410
Add Parsec's for Luminosity Distance: 160
Subtract Parsec's for Luminosity Distance: 180
0.00000000006674 Gravitational Constant
2.000000000000001 G as exponential growth
6.280000000000003 Gravities Geometry
1,271,400,000.0 Ligos distance approximation from luminosity in light years
1,262,599,571.4 Distance Gravity Wave traveled going by ONeils Gravity Geometric
8,800,428.55358386 difference from Ligo and Geometric source in light years
______________________________________________________________________________

Enter Number to divide Proton: 1000000
Spin Number: 8
Enter number of Parsec's for Luminosity Distance: 5300
Add Parsec's for Luminosity Distance: 2400
Subtract Parsec's for Luminosity Distance: 2600
0.00000000006674 Gravitational Constant
2.0 G as exponential growth
6.280000000000000 Gravities Geometry
16,626,000,000.0 Ligos distance approximation from luminosity in light years
15,782,494,643.1 Distance Gravity Wave traveled going by O'Neil's Gravity Geometric
843,505,356.919796 difference from Ligo and Geometric source in light years

import time
print('''Two to the power of Exponential growth of Gravities
Constant <G> multiplied by the fine structure contant multiplied
by 12 hours divided by n.
________________________________________ ''')
while True:
    n = int(input("Enter Number to divide Proton: "))
    s = int(input("Spin Number: "))
    Parsec = int(input("Enter number of Parsec's for Luminosity Distance: "))
    Plus_Parsec = int(input("Add Parsec's for Luminosity Distance: "))
    Minus_Parsec = int(input("Subtract Parsec's for Luminosity Distance: "))
    start_time = time.time()
    G_constant = (.00000000006674)
    proton_width = (((0.00000000000001)*s)/(n))
    gravity_wave = ((proton_width))
    G = ((pow(2,((1 +(((.00000000006674*.0072973*(12/n))*((( 1 ))))))))))
    Gravities_Geometry = ((G*3.14))
    Distance_to_Gravity_Waves_Source = ((((((G))/(gravity_wave))*86400*365)/((Gravities_Geometry)-((G/2))))/9461000000000000)
    
    Ligos_approximation_Black_hole_merger_from_luminosity = (1000000*3.26*(Parsec+(Plus_Parsec-Minus_Parsec)))
    difference = (Ligos_approximation_Black_hole_merger_from_luminosity-Distance_to_Gravity_Waves_Source)
    print('{0:.14f}'.format(G_constant),'Gravitational Constant')
#    print('{0:.99f}'.format(proton_width),'Proton Width')
#    print('{0:.110f}'.format(gravity_wave),'Gravity Wave')
    print(G,'G as exponential growth')
    print('{0:.15f}'.format(Gravities_Geometry),'Gravities_Geometry')

    print("{:,}".format(Ligos_approximation_Black_hole_merger_from_luminosity),'Ligos distance approximation from luminosity in light years')
    print('{0:,.1f}'.format(Distance_to_Gravity_Waves_Source),'Distance Gravity Wave traveled going by ONeils Gravity Geometric')
    print("{:,}".format(difference),'difference from Ligo and Geometric source in light years')
    e = int(time.time() - start_time)
    print('{:02d}:{:02d}:{:02d}'.format(e // 3600, (e % 3600 // 60), e % 60))

 

Edited by SirHope
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What do you mean you are not showing distance is not related to luminosity? A lot of numbers appear in your post but to be honest, the arguments being made are as clear as mud. At least for me, can you explain more CLEARLY what you are saying? Thank you if you would appease my request.

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