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54 minutes ago, phillip1882 said:

can you elaborate on that?

 

Our solar system is the sun, getting less dense by expanding its volume in space. Mass from the core moves outward from the core, hence planets come from the core, which we call the Sun.

 

Imagine a drop of water, being heated and turning to steam. As the process evolves, the molocules of water move away from the drop, so the drop itself loses mass, while those particles expand into a greater volume. When the process is complete the drop is gone and the "sphere" of steam is a greater volume than the drop used to be. The water drop simply evolved to a greater volume. Another way to say it is that the particles came from the core "the drop" and moved outward. Still another way to say it is that mass evolved to space. Another way to say it is that the earth came from the sun! The planets are getting farther from the sun. Our solar system is the sun, expanding and getting less dense. Particles from the core move outward, and planets are born!

Good now?

Edited by Motor Daddy
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34 minutes ago, phillip1882 said:

okay that doesn't make sense at all.

firstly the planets are of a wide variety of sizes. secondly most have moons. thirdly how would you get solid rock from hydrogen, what the sun is made of?

fourthly how would the matter get distant enough to combine into it's own separate object?

1. I didn't imply the planets should be the same sizes.

2. Planet-moon systems evolve to space. All objects evolve to space. 

3. Rock is motion. There isn't this magic thing called substance. Mass is motion, period. The earth is "in motion" around the sun, and the earth is "made of motion", as all the elements of the object earth are in motion within earth. You are made of motion, as every element of yourself is in motion and made of motion. You seem to think there is this thing called substance, and that simply isn't the case. There is no basic element that everything is made of, other than motion itself.

4. Systems expand because there is no such thing as perpetual motion. Work is done, and planets move away from the core. Our solar system is burning out, and the planets are debris from the core like smoke particles from a burning fire.

The Sun is not keeping the planets in orbit by the "tug" of gravity, the Sun is forcing the planets away. 

 

If it doesn't make sense to you it's because you've been told something different, and that is wrong.

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There isn't this magic thing called substance. Mass is motion, period.

You seem to think there is this thing called substance, and that simply isn't the case.

matter is made up of atoms. i agree, not everything is made up of the same atoms.

matter is not motion. yes it's in motion, but it's not motion itself. what does that even mean?

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I didn't imply the planets should be the same sizes.

nor did you specify why they are different.

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Planet-moon systems evolve to space. All objects evolve to space. 

you don't understand what i'm asking. why do planets have moons?

i agree things do tend to go to nothing, or space as you say, but as it does so, it generally doesn't leave behind matter that interacts with each other.

 

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40 minutes ago, phillip1882 said:

matter is made up of atoms. i agree, not everything is made up of the same atoms.

matter is not motion. yes it's in motion, but it's not motion itself. what does that even mean?

nor did you specify why they are different.

you don't understand what i'm asking. why do planets have moons?

i agree things do tend to go to nothing, or space as you say, but as it does so, it generally doesn't leave behind matter that interacts with each other.

 

1. Atoms are made of motion, not some magic basic "substance." Again, there is not a basic sustance that everything is made of. It is all made of motion.

2. Even if planets were born of the same size, they were not born at the same time, so the older planets have had more time to evolve, get farther away, and get less dense. The outer older planets are gas because that is a less dense area of the solar system. The solar system is most dense at the core and least dense at the outer regions. Like all objects, the core is most dense and as you get further away it is less dense. It's a density order. It's that way because mass evolves to space and gets less dense as time goes by.

3. Planets have moons for the same reason the sun has planets, mass evolves to space! The objects that orbit the core come from the core. Solar systems orbit the galactic core because they came from the core and get farther away. Universes orbit the core of the multiverse because they came from the core and get farther away. As they get farther away they get less dense themselves. It happens at all levels to every element, mass evolves to space and gets less dense.

Eventually the ojects are so less dense that they cease to exist as an object. Nothing lasts forever! Mass evolves to space. Objects come from the core and move out and get less dense.

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18 minutes ago, write4u said:

Doesn't gravity cause objects to become more dense?

 

No. Gravity is the repositioning of the object to its proper place in the density order. Gravity is what makes a helium balloon get farther away from the center of the earth if you release it. The balloon is less dense so it moves away from the core until it reaches its proper density area. Gravity also causes a lifted rock to fall closer to the center of the earth when released, because the rock is more dense and it moves to the core, as the core is more dense than above the surface of the earth. It works both ways, it repositions objects to its proper place in the density order.

The Sun is not "pulling" on the planets, the Sun is forcing the planets away as they get less dense.

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7 hours ago, Motor Daddy said:

Gravity is what makes a helium balloon get farther away from the center of the earth if you release it. The balloon is less dense so it moves away from the core until it reaches its proper density area

I understand what you are saying about expansion but that is in spite of gravity, not because of it. 

Air (bouyancy) is what makes a helium balloon rise . Gravity would make the balloon fall down helium was not less dense than the air. In an airless environment the helium balloon would fall down due to gravity.  Expansion is due to heat. 

A hot air balloon is a perfect example of expansion due to heat.

Forming a giant

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Most of the stars in the universe are main sequence stars — those converting hydrogen into helium via nuclear fusion. A main sequence star may have a mass between a third to eight times that of the sun and eventually burn through the hydrogen in its core. Over its life, the outward pressure of fusion has balanced against the inward pressure of gravity. Once the fusion stops, gravity takes the lead and compresses the star smaller and tighter.

https://www.space.com/22471-red-giant-stars.html#

The Helium Flash

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The beginning of the end for a red giant the mass of our Sun occurs very suddenly.  As the helium "ashes" continue to pile up at its center, a higher fraction of them turn electron-degenerate.  It is an odd paradox:  even as the outer layers of a red giant star are expanding into a huge but tenuous cloud, its inner core is contracting down to form a buried white dwarf.  The temperature and pressure in the Sun's core will soar to 10 times their current values.  And roughly 1.2 billion years after it leaves the main sequence, at the height of its glory as a red giant, the center of the helium core of the Sun will become sufficiently massive, dense, and hot that something amazing will happen:  within a matter of minutes, it will ignite and burn.

https://faculty.wcas.northwestern.edu/~infocom/The Website/end.html#

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7 hours ago, write4u said:

I understand what you are saying about expansion but that is in spite of gravity, not because of it. 

Air (bouyancy) is what makes a helium balloon rise . Gravity would make the balloon fall down helium was not less dense than the air. In an airless environment the helium balloon would fall down due to gravity.  Expansion is due to heat. 

A hot air balloon is a perfect example of expansion due to heat.

Air is more dense than helium, so air's natural place in the density order is closer to the core than helium's place in the order.  In an "airless environment" helium would be more dense than that environment, so it would be closer to the core in the natural order.

A hot air balloon is less dense than the surrounding cooler air (cold air is more dense than hot air), so it rises to the point its density matches the environment unless forced to do different.

A relatively empty balloon taken to the upper atmosphere will expand to the density of its environment, to the point the density will be equal and it will not rise or fall. Watch the balloon in the link expand to the environment as it gets farther away from earth "higher altitude."

 

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