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In view of the number of conspiracy theories supported by some on this forum based around lizard people, 5G and Covid-19 etc, would any one like to discuss the mentality of people supporting them. 

 

3 brief psychology based articles on the subject of conspiracy theories and why some people actually believe this nonsense.  

 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/insight-therapy/202004/true-false-believers-the-psychology-conspiracy-theories

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/thoughts-thinking/202004/critically-thinking-about-conspiracy-theories-and-covid-19

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/morality-and-suspicion/202004/covid-19-conspiracy-theories-and-5g-networks

 

Perhaps after reading the links some might feel they fit into the mentality described in these links. 

 

Does a lack of education, and incorrectly joining bits of unrelated information have anything to do with it?

 

What in particular makes you or some one you know personally believe in a particular conspiracy theory?

 

 

 

 

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Be careful labelling all conspiracy theories as nonsense, always try to avoid precondition responses like that. Conspiracy theory (whether naturally or by design, or a bit of both) has become a highly

Here's the proof of it being an inside job. The film of building 7 shown collapsing before it actually collapsed in real life time.    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEsjv9vKCGc Is that an animated f

Yes seriously. Karate, Tae Kwon Do (although not much formal training in that one) and Kickboxing. Are martial artists not allowed on science forums or something?   You all seem incredibly scary and i

Be careful labelling all conspiracy theories as nonsense, always try to avoid precondition responses like that. Conspiracy theory (whether naturally or by design, or a bit of both) has become a highly weaponised term that produces a trained response. No doubt some conspiracy theories are somewhat accurate while others are utter nonsense.

Look at it this way, do you trust the people in power or those with wealth and/or influence? Almost everybody would answer no to this question and yet reject every example of possible instances of those same people lying and covering it up, that's an irrational preconditioned response.

Most conspiracy theories are by their nature unproven, the question is how tenuous and unbelievable are the dots that have been joined to make the theory?

I'd say a lack of formal education is an advantage when it comes to seeing a clearer picture of the world around us. Formal education is designed to make us productive, not knowledgable or clear minded.

I'd be much more interested in the psychology behind the tendency of formally educated people to label anything outside of what they've been taught as false yet believing without question in what they've been told by what they believe to be an authority.

There are experiments that show an effect where people tend to want to give up critical thinking and follow without question the instructions of somebody they trust, I can't remember the details but it's quite a well known experiment.

 

Edit:

Remember that from their perspective it's people like you who are completely batshit.

Edited by A-wal
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In view of the number of conspiracy theories supported by some on this forum based around lizard people, 5G and Covid-19 etc, would any one like to discuss the mentality of people supporting them. 

 

3 brief psychology based articles on the subject of conspiracy theories and why some people actually believe this nonsense.  

 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/insight-therapy/202004/true-false-believers-the-psychology-conspiracy-theories

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/thoughts-thinking/202004/critically-thinking-about-conspiracy-theories-and-covid-19

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/morality-and-suspicion/202004/covid-19-conspiracy-theories-and-5g-networks

 

Perhaps after reading the links some might feel they fit into the mentality described in these links. 

 

Does a lack of education, and incorrectly joining bits of unrelated information have anything to do with it?

 

What in particular makes you or some one you know personally believe in a particular conspiracy theory?

I think that most conspiracy theories can be quickly ferreted out by normal and rational people. Could you run some kind of test on that. A-wal seems to be a pretty straight guy so far and I can assure you that I'm normal and rational. I'll be one of your targets for the experiment and likely A-wal wouldn't fear doing it too.

 

I'm suggesting making a list of a dozen or so issues that are either conspiracy theory bullsh-t or factual truths for us to decide upon. That would tell you whether or not we are normal and rational.

 

And bonus points for getting balagna and Thoth involved! 

 

And then if you agree to give it a try, don't make them too complicated and debatable. Go for stuff like:

 

1. Was 911 an inside job.

2. Did man ever land on the moon.

3. Is Trump a narcissist?

4. Is creationism real?

 

Etc. those are just examples of easy ones to answer.

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Be careful labelling all conspiracy theories as nonsense, always try to avoid precondition responses like that. Conspiracy theory (whether naturally or by design, or a bit of both) has become a highly weaponised term that produces a trained response. No doubt some conspiracy theories are somewhat accurate while others are utter nonsense.

 

Look at it this way, do you trust the people in power or those with wealth and/or influence? Almost everybody would answer no to this question and yet reject every example of possible instances of those same people lying and covering it up, that's an irrational preconditioned response.

 

Most conspiracy theories are by their nature unproven, the question is how tenuous and unbelievable are the dots that have been joined to make the theory?

 

I'd say a lack of formal education is an advantage when it comes to seeing a clearer picture of the world around us. Formal education is designed to make us productive, not knowledgable or clear minded.

 

I'd be much more interested in the psychology behind the tendency of formally educated people to label anything outside of what they've been taught as false yet believing without question in what they've been told by what they believe to be an authority.

 

There are experiments that show an effect where people tend to want to give up critical thinking and follow without question the instructions of somebody they trust, I can't remember the details but it's quite a well known experiment.

 

Edit:

Remember that from their perspective it's people like you who are completely batshit.

I can't help but immediately start thinking of religious beliefs as a conspiracy theory. The reason why a brain surgeon or a nuclear physicist can believe in creation is because he/she was indoctrinated at a very young age.

It's much the same as the baby duckling imprinting on the Fox as it's mother. There's no chance in changing the minds of the duck or the Christian. 

 

If religion is one of yours then just disregard what I've said.

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1. Was 911 an inside job.

2. Did man ever land on the moon.

3. Is Trump a narcissist?

4. Is creationism real?

1. Probably. There's something very dodgy about it. No visible plane debris at the pentagon, a completely separate building collapsing for no apparent reason other than presumably feeling left out and all the 'suicides' surrounding witnesses,

 

2. Probably. Although I seriously doubt if it was when it was supposed to be. The whole world was watching and it would have been so easy for something to go horribly wrong, plus they wanted to beat the Russians to keep the people's hilarious delusion of superiority going. Apollo twelve was the first.

 

3. Obviously.

 

4. Absolutely not, including big bang creationism. ESPECIALLY big bang creationism!

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In view of the number of conspiracy theories supported by some on this forum based around lizard people, 5G and Covid-19 etc, would any one like to discuss the mentality of people supporting them. 

 

3 brief psychology based articles on the subject of conspiracy theories and why some people actually believe this nonsense.  

 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/insight-therapy/202004/true-false-believers-the-psychology-conspiracy-theories

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/thoughts-thinking/202004/critically-thinking-about-conspiracy-theories-and-covid-19

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/morality-and-suspicion/202004/covid-19-conspiracy-theories-and-5g-networks

 

Perhaps after reading the links some might feel they fit into the mentality described in these links. 

 

Does a lack of education, and incorrectly joining bits of unrelated information have anything to do with it?

 

What in particular makes you or some one you know personally believe in a particular conspiracy theory?

I have been on the internet for 20 years I can tell when someone is spouting bullshit, it is like a sixth sense when something doesn't make sense often it is bullshit. If someone can not explain something within the laws of science or explain something within what usually happens in society it is bullshit aswell. Just from being on the internet for a long enough time you gain a sense for what is true and isn't. There is so much false information on the internet that eventually you get a false view of the world or learn to take it as "Possibly Correct" as you take in a larger body of information from many different sources you gain that sixth sense to smell bullshit.

Edited by VictorMedvil
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Be careful labelling all conspiracy theories as nonsense, always try to avoid precondition responses like that. Conspiracy theory (whether naturally or by design, or a bit of both) has become a highly weaponised term that produces a trained response. No doubt some conspiracy theories are somewhat accurate while others are utter nonsense.

 

Look at it this way, do you trust the people in power or those with wealth and/or influence? Almost everybody would answer no to this question and yet reject every example of possible instances of those same people lying and covering it up, that's an irrational preconditioned response.

 

Most conspiracy theories are by their nature unproven, the question is how tenuous and unbelievable are the dots that have been joined to make the theory?

 

I'd say a lack of formal education is an advantage when it comes to seeing a clearer picture of the world around us. Formal education is designed to make us productive, not knowledgable or clear minded.

 

I'd be much more interested in the psychology behind the tendency of formally educated people to label anything outside of what they've been taught as false yet believing without question in what they've been told by what they believe to be an authority.

 

There are experiments that show an effect where people tend to want to give up critical thinking and follow without question the instructions of somebody they trust, I can't remember the details but it's quite a well known experiment.

 

Edit:

Remember that from their perspective it's people like you who are completely batshit.

 

Noted, I think part of the explanation for many conspiracy theories is, peoples need for a something to blame for an effect (god, conspiracy, political, etc).

 

A whole heap of unrelated occurrences, can cause a local effect, which people misinterpret, or ascribe to a god, an elite group of beings, ghosts etc. 

 

Few older people trust politicians, the young tend to be more optimistic, gullible. 

 

Tower 7  :) was a construction oversight, whereby the collapse of the other two towers, severed the water supply stopping the fire extinguishers from working in tower 7. A fire got out of control, which caused the collapse of a floor, and a domino effect resulting in the central column giving way.

 

Pandemics come around on average every 50 years, so covid-19 is no shock. George Bush,Bill Gates and the WHO have been suggesting we prepare for the next pandemic years ago. How can this be described as a conspiracy.

 

The Covid 19 is an attempt by the evil powers that be, known to conspiracy theorists, because they want to inject everyone with a vaccine that will enable people to be tracked through the 5 G network. 

 

 

1. Probably. There's something very dodgy about it. No visible plane debris at the pentagon, a completely separate building collapsing for no apparent reason other than presumably feeling left out and all the 'suicides' surrounding witnesses,

 

2. Probably. Although I seriously doubt if it was when it was supposed to be. The whole world was watching and it would have been so easy for something to go horribly wrong, plus they wanted to beat the Russians to keep the people's hilarious delusion of superiority going. Apollo twelve was the first.

 

3. Obviously.

 

4. Absolutely not, including big bang creationism. ESPECIALLY big bang creationism!

 

1) The Pentagon story was dodgy, passports that survived the inferno which melted the plane debris. I have not heard of suicides of witnesses. 

 

4) The original Big Bang was based on creationism, in the beginning there was light, it was even approved by the Catholic church. The current big bang theory, with inflation is a variation on a theme, it is not completely unrelated to Steady State theory. Its just the speed at which things happen, and over what length of time makes them different. Both are trying to explain the wreckage of multiple car crashes which happened billions of years ago. Which ever way you look at it Hoyles nuclear synthesis is the way the heavier elements were likely created, in super Novaes. Both theories have to get there Hydrogen from some where, to fuel the suns, and supernovae. I dont think this is a conspiracy or an attempt to cover stuff up, by the scientific community, unless you are referring to the thought Police on some forums that refuse to look at anything that is not mainstream.  

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I can't help but immediately start thinking of religious beliefs as a conspiracy theory. The reason why a brain surgeon or a nuclear physicist can believe in creation is because he/she was indoctrinated at a very young age.

It's much the same as the baby duckling imprinting on the Fox as it's mother. There's no chance in changing the minds of the duck or the Christian. 

 

If religion is one of yours then just disregard what I've said.

 

I have no religious belief. But yes once some one is imprinted child duck etc, it is hard from them to get the programming out of there heads.

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I have been on the internet for 20 years I can tell when someone is spouting bullshit, it is like a sixth sense when something doesn't make sense often it is bullshit. If someone can not explain something within the laws of science or explain something within what usually happens in society it is bullshit aswell. Just from being on the internet for a long enough time you gain a sense for what is true and isn't. There is so much false information on the internet that eventually you get a false view of the world or learn to take it as "Possibly Correct" as you take in a larger body of information from many different sources you gain that sixth sense to smell bullshit.

 

Did you have a theory ref Black holes being the origin of the universe? 

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Did you have a theory ref Black holes being the origin of the universe? 

Yes, that idea is not original, that is from Steven Hawking: Universe in a nutshell(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Universe_in_a_Nutshell) and Brief History of Time(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Brief_History_of_Time). So Basically String Theory.

Edited by VictorMedvil
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I have no religious belief. But yes once some one is imprinted child duck etc, it is hard from them to get the programming out of there heads.

Thank you! You appear to be agreeing that being imprinted at an early age is at least one of the main reasons for highly intelligent people believing in superstitiuos nonsense.

 

If you have other reasons, I'm interested in hearing them?

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1. Probably. There's something very dodgy about it. No visible plane debris at the pentagon, a completely separate building collapsing for no apparent reason other than presumably feeling left out and all the 'suicides' surrounding witnesses,

 

2. Probably. Although I seriously doubt if it was when it was supposed to be. The whole world was watching and it would have been so easy for something to go horribly wrong, plus they wanted to beat the Russians to keep the people's hilarious delusion of superiority going. Apollo twelve was the first.

 

3. Obviously.

 

4. Absolutely not, including big bang creationism. ESPECIALLY big bang creationism!

I only provided those 4 as examples, but in any case I see now that this isn't a great place to be talking about conspiracy theories.

 

However, I can't help but being interested in your answer to #2. Your idea is getting moderately popular on utube now. So my question to you is: Is there any defense of the moon landing being on the same date as stated. Fwiw, I remember it very well. I'm suggesting that in many cases the nature of the defense will tell us something. For instance: If someone proposes that 911 was an inside job, the defense of the official story will be pretty weak or non-existent. While the defense of something that's questionable will be vociferous on the part of the party that needs to uphold the official story.

 

So that makes your theory on #2 interesting to me at least. I tend to lean toward the official story being true, even though you raise some excellent points!

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If you have other reasons, I'm interested in hearing them?

 

The human brain  joins together dots of information making patterns, optical illusions ie the candle stick versus 2 face. People taking hallucinagens, or having mental illness, etc can all give different views on reality. Some even hear voices and or stream pictures into their heads @Thoth101. 

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Be careful labelling all conspiracy theories as nonsense, always try to avoid precondition responses like that. Conspiracy theory (whether naturally or by design, or a bit of both) has become a highly weaponised term that produces a trained response. No doubt some conspiracy theories are somewhat accurate while others are utter nonsense.

 

Look at it this way, do you trust the people in power or those with wealth and/or influence? Almost everybody would answer no to this question and yet reject every example of possible instances of those same people lying and covering it up, that's an irrational preconditioned response.

 

Most conspiracy theories are by their nature unproven, the question is how tenuous and unbelievable are the dots that have been joined to make the theory?

 

I'd say a lack of formal education is an advantage when it comes to seeing a clearer picture of the world around us. Formal education is designed to make us productive, not knowledgable or clear minded.

 

I'd be much more interested in the psychology behind the tendency of formally educated people to label anything outside of what they've been taught as false yet believing without question in what they've been told by what they believe to be an authority.

 

There are experiments that show an effect where people tend to want to give up critical thinking and follow without question the instructions of somebody they trust, I can't remember the details but it's quite a well known experiment.

 

Edit:

Remember that from their perspective it's people like you who are completely batshit.

Very well said A- Wal and lets look up the definition of a conspiracy:

 

 

Definition of conspiracy

 

1: the act of conspiring togetherThey were accused of conspiracy to commit murder.
2a: an agreement among conspiratorsuncovered a conspiracy against the government
b: a group of conspiratorsa conspiracy made up of disgruntled aristocrats

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conspiracy

 

When a crime takes place even law enforcement has their theories on what might have happened. Or a conspiracy theory.

 

All conspiracy theories are is, different ways to look at what really is going on.

 

 

CIA Document 1035-960: Foundation of a Weaponized Term

https://projectunspeakable.com/conspiracy-theory-invention-of-cia/

 

The mainstream media wants to put conspiracy theories down but it is a way for people to make sense of the world and to ask questions. The controllers don't want questions being asked which is why the term was weaponized. For sure if entites are hiding things they don't want questions to be asked or people using thought.

 

But yes some conspiracy theories are outlandish but also many conspiracy theories were found to be true.

 

12 crazy conspiracy theories that actually turned out to be true

https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/12-crazy-conspiracy-theories-actually-turned-out-be-true

 

I say question everything........

Edited by Thoth101
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The human brain  joins together dots of information making patterns, optical illusions ie the candle stick versus 2 face. People taking hallucinagens, or having mental illness, etc can all give different views on reality. Some even hear voices and or stream pictures into their heads @Thoth101. 

Really now? Maybe you will do some unbiased research at some point in your life and actually learn what is really going on and connect the dots. You can poke fun of me all you want and I don't think you are stupid just mislead in your thinking. Maybe turn the propaganda off and do yourself some research on your own instead of believing what the "officials" or "experts" tell you.

Edited by Thoth101
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ACADEMIA AND MAINSTREAM MEDIA ATTACK “CONSPIRACY THEORISTS” AGAIN

 

 

Here are some irrefutable facts to put reality in perspective: from an article titled “Governments and Biowarfare: a Brief History”

– 1932: The Tuskegee Syphilis Study begins. 200 black men diagnosed with syphilis are never told of their illness, are denied treatment, and instead are used as human guinea pigs in order to follow the progression and symptoms of the disease. They all subsequently die from syphilis, their families never told that they could have been treated. Follow this link for more info.

– 1950: In an experiment to determine how susceptible an American city would be to biological attack, the U.S. Navy sprays a cloud of bacteria from ships over San Francisco. Monitoring devices are situated throughout the city in order to test the extent of infection. Many residents become ill with pneumonia-like symptoms. Follow this link for more info.

– 1955: The CIA, in an experiment to test its ability to infect human populations with biological agents, releases a bacteria withdrawn from the Army’s biological warfare arsenal over Tampa Bay, Fl. Follow this link for more info.

– 1956: U.S. military releases mosquitoes infected with Yellow Fever over Savannah, Ga and Avon Park, Fl. Following each test, Army agents posing as public health officials test victims for effects. Follow this link for more info.

– 1965: Prisoners at the Holmesburg State Prison in Philadelphia are subjected to dioxin, the highly toxic chemical component of Agent Orange used in Viet Nam. The men are later studied for development of cancer, which indicates that Agent Orange had been a suspected carcinogen all along. Follow this link for more info.

– 1966: U.S. Army dispenses Bacillus subtilis variant niger throughout the New York City subway system. More than a million civilians are exposed when army scientists drop lightbulbs filled with the bacteria onto ventilation grates. Follow this link for more info.

– 1990: More than 1500 six-month-old black and Hispanic babies in Los Angeles are given an “experimental” measles vaccine that had never been licensed for use in the United States. CDC later admits that parents were never informed that the vaccine being injected to their children was experimental. Follow this link for more info.

– 1994: With a technique called “gene tracking,” Dr. Garth Nicolson at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX discovers that many returning Desert Storm veterans are infected with an altered strain of Mycoplasma incognitus, a microbe commonly used in the production of biological weapons. Incorporated into its molecular structure is 40 percent of the HIV protein coat, indicating that it had been man-made. Follow this link for more info

The bottom line is, there are all types of historical facts, crimes committed by governments, events, pieces of information, that the ordinary person has not investigated. Once you learn about historical facts that are suppressed by governments, corporations, and their media partners, you realize this:

Nobody has a perfect measure of probability. Nobody has the ability to say “no, that can’t be true, that’s not probable,” because to have an accurate sense of probability, you’d have to know a lot more than you do.

There are so many historical facts that could obliterate a person’s perception of “probable.”

https://www.thelastamericanvagabond.com/top-news/academia-and-mainstream-media-attack-conspiracy-theorists-again/

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