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Turtle?


hazelm
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That aint no turtle.

 

 

Some distant relative, maybe, but not no turtle.

 

BTW, Hazel.  I sent you a message a while back.   Did you ever read it?

I haven't seen it.  I should check that more often.  I'll  take a look.

 

P.S.  Please tell me where to find it.  Search is not bringing it up.  Thank you.

Edited by hazelm
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I haven't seen it.  I should check that more often.  I'll  take a look.

 

P.S.  Please tell me where to find it.  Search is not bringing it up.  Thank you.

 

1.  Go to the philosophy forum, then the "weight room" sub-forum.  Then look for the the thread title, which should be close to the top.

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Not exactly a turtle...but it was tasty anyways.  :spiteful:

 

Pappochelys (παπποχέλυς [πάππος (grandfather) + χέλυς (turtle)] meaning "grandfather turtle" in Greek) is an extinct genus of diapsid reptile closely related to turtles. The genus contains only one species, Pappochelys rosinae, from the Middle Triassic of Germany, which was named by paleontologists Rainer Schoch [de] and Hans-Dieter Sues in 2015.

Edited by fahrquad
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Interesting.  We have previously been told that cancer was a defect in our own cells, but this seems to imply an external agent since we share no genes with turtles.

 

240-million-year-old turtle died with a type of bone cancer that still haunts the living, National Geographic reports. The ancient turtle’s fossilized hind leg included a malignancy the researchers identified as a type of bone cancer that strikes about 800 Americans each year. Cancer is extraordinarily rare in the fossil record because it typically affects soft tissues that aren’t preserved. Paleontologists unearthed this relative of modern turtles (Pappochelys rosinae) in 2008 near Stuttgart, Germany. Researchers pegged the fossilized cancer as periosteal osteosarcoma, noting it was almost identical to osteosarcomas afflicting humans today, they reported earlier this week in JAMA Oncology. This 240-million-year-old cancer is the earliest case ever recorded in an amniote—the group including reptiles, birds, and mammals—suggesting cancers of today and the genes underlying them have roots deep in evolutionary time.

Edited by fahrquad
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Not exactly a turtle...but it was tasty anyways.  :spiteful:

 

Pappochelys (παπποχέλυς [πάππος (grandfather) + χέλυς (turtle)] meaning "grandfather turtle" in Greek) is an extinct genus of diapsid reptile closely related to turtles. The genus contains only one species, Pappochelys rosinae, from the Middle Triassic of Germany, which was named by paleontologists Rainer Schoch [de] and Hans-Dieter Sues in 2015.

 

Γιατί τα ταξινομικά ονόματα είναι πάντα λατινικές εκδόσεις ελληνικών ονομάτων?

 

(https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&ei=aiZ7XJP2AYHr_QaphKyYCQ&q=translate+%CE%93%CE%B9%CE%B1%CF%84%CE%AF+%CF%84%CE%B1+%CF%84%CE%B1%CE%BE%CE%B9%CE%BD%CE%BF%CE%BC%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%AC+%CE%BF%CE%BD%CF%8C%CE%BC%CE%B1%CF%84%CE%B1+%CE%B5%CE%AF%CE%BD%CE%B1%CE%B9+%CF%80%CE%AC%CE%BD%CF%84%CE%B1+%CE%BB%CE%B1%CF%84%CE%B9%CE%BD%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%AD%CF%82+%CE%B5%CE%BA%CE%B4%CF%8C%CF%83%CE%B5%CE%B9%CF%82+%CE%B5%CE%BB%CE%BB%CE%B7%CE%BD%CE%B9%CE%BA%CF%8E%CE%BD+%CE%BF%CE%BD%CE%BF%CE%BC%CE%AC%CF%84%CF%89%CE%BD&oq=translate+%CE%93%CE%B9%CE%B1%CF%84%CE%AF+%CF%84%CE%B1+%CF%84%CE%B1%CE%BE%CE%B9%CE%BD%CE%BF%CE%BC%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%AC+%CE%BF%CE%BD%CF%8C%CE%BC%CE%B1%CF%84%CE%B1+%CE%B5%CE%AF%CE%BD%CE%B1%CE%B9+%CF%80%CE%AC%CE%BD%CF%84%CE%B1+%CE%BB%CE%B1%CF%84%CE%B9%CE%BD%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%AD%CF%82+%CE%B5%CE%BA%CE%B4%CF%8C%CF%83%CE%B5%CE%B9%CF%82+%CE%B5%CE%BB%CE%BB%CE%B7%CE%BD%CE%B9%CE%BA%CF%8E%CE%BD+%CE%BF%CE%BD%CE%BF%CE%BC%CE%AC%CF%84%CF%89%CE%BD&gs_l=psy-ab.12...3530.6202..8504...0.0..0.232.1718.0j9j1......0....1..gws-wiz.tOASf_vxv24)

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