Jump to content
Science Forums

Recommended Posts

Since metaphor is a feature of language, I’d say is arises from entities that are capable of using metaphor-containing language.

 

Metaphor appears to play a critical role in the human mind, not just when its used in language, but even in the thoughts of people who don’t understand the concept of metaphor. A lot’s been written on this subject – one of my favorite writers on it is George Lakoff, who’s written such obviously-titled works on it as his 1980 Metaphors We Live By, and has been a major influence among linguists, psychologists, and philosophers.

 

I find the question of whether the used of metaphor is unique to humans an interesting one. I think some non-human animals use it – for example, Koko, a female gorilla who was taught American Sign Language, named her pet kittens such things as “All Ball”, and “Lipstick”, which seems metaphorical to me, as she clearly understood that these animals were living things, not balls or lipstick, so was using these words metaphorically.

 

I’m also very interested in writing computer programs that use metaphor, though I’ve not done so, and don’t think anybody yet has. I think that a program that could do so would be a true strong artificial intelligence.

 

As far as the title question about a link between atoms and metaphor, I don’t think atoms are more strongly linked to metaphor than they are to any physical phenomena. I find the question not very useful, and worse, a distraction.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Since metaphor is a feature of language, I’d say is arises from entities that are capable of using metaphor-containing language.

 

Metaphor appears to play a critical role in the human mind, not just when its used in language, but even in the thoughts of people who don’t understand the concept of metaphor. A lot’s been written on this subject – one of my favorite writers on it is George Lakoff, who’s written such obviously-titled works on it as his 1980 Metaphors We Live By, and has been a major influence among linguists, psychologists, and philosophers.

 

I find the question of whether the used of metaphor is unique to humans an interesting one. I think some non-human animals use it – for example, Koko, a female gorilla who was taught American Sign Language, named her pet kittens such things as “All Ball”, and “Lipstick”, which seems metaphorical to me, as she clearly understood that these animals were living things, not balls or lipstick, so was using these words metaphorically.

 

I’m also very interested in writing computer programs that use metaphor, though I’ve not done so, and don’t think anybody yet has. I think that a program that could do so would be a true strong artificial intelligence.

 

As far as the title question about a link between atoms and metaphor, I don’t think atoms are more strongly linked to metaphor than they are to any physical phenomena. I find the question not very useful, and worse, a distraction.

I'm of the position that if metaphors are an intended difference, this suggests that atoms aren't real. The source of the intended difference is not intended difference, making it difference that isn't meant to exist.

Metaphors are post-not intended difference, meaning that they can be the identity of a duplicate of reality's source.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm of the position that if metaphors are an intended difference, this suggests that atoms aren't real. The source of the intended difference is not intended difference, making it difference that isn't meant to exist.

Metaphors are post-not intended difference, meaning that they can be the identity of a duplicate of reality's source.

:huh: Definitely high, as a kite, with a very long string, on an extremely windy day.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm of the position that if metaphors are an intended difference, this suggests that atoms aren't real. The source of the intended difference is not intended difference, making it difference that isn't meant to exist.

Metaphors are post-not intended difference, meaning that they can be the identity of a duplicate of reality's source.

?????  Exactly what planet are you on?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...