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I think this video might surprise you.

Did you ever heard about the mantis shrimp?Or about the pistol shrimp?

Well, if you did don't flatter yourself, they are the holy grail of slow motion and are both capable of creating little stars. Did you ever heard that question "If a tree falls down and there's nobody around to hear it, does it still make a sound?".

I make you a similar one, if a star only exist for a brief (really really brief) moment of time, is it still a star?

I hope you enjoy the video ;)

 


 


 


 


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SPeaking of those shrimp: check out the guys doing gene therapy to give apes trichromatic vision. I hear they're going to use mantis shrimp DNA to try to give them tetra or more.sometime in the near future too.
Interesting idea to "cure" colorblindness, and possibly elevate the rest of us regular humans to the tetrachromat level some women have.

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Did you ever heard about the mantis shrimp?Or about the pistol shrimp?

Well, if you did don't flatter yourself, they are the holy grail of slow motion and are both capable of creating little stars.

Whether electric powered transducers or pistol shrimp a creating little stars depends on whether by “star” you mean “something that emits light” or “something that fuses light elements into heavy”.

 

A sufficiently powerful compression in a fluid certainly emits light – Sonoluminesces. But whether these “little stars” are, like normal sized ones, bubble fusing, or just, like a incandescent light bulb, glowing, is questionable.

 

Bubble fusion is a neat idea, but its science is messy and full or fraud and disgrace. I don’t think it’s in principle impossible – a nearly perfectly spherical collapsing cavitation bubble is not all that different from the nearly perfectly spherical inward-directed fission explosion of a fusion bomb – but its literature suggests that for the usual about 0.00004 m bubbles made by transducers and shrimp, fusion is very rare to non-existent.

 

SPeaking of those shrimp: check out the guys doing gene therapy to give apes trichromatic vision. I hear they're going to use mantis shrimp DNA to try to give them tetra or more.sometime in the near future too.

I think you’re confusing your primates – the great apes already have 3-color vision, likely nearly identical to us Homo Sapiens. I don’t know if anyone’s shown that 4-color vision occurs in female apes, but given that their chromosomes are very like ours (it’s not entirely clear if Homo Sapiens couldn’t breed with Pan Troglodytes and the like, or if, like lions can breed with tigers, given unnatural (and awfully unethical) conditions, we could), am pretty sure it does.

 

Most new world monkeys are, like most non-primate mammals, only 2-colored, with 3-colored vision occurring in some females. I think the color-blindness curing gene therapy experiments you’re speaking of is from K. Mancuso, W. W. Hauswirth, et al's "Gene therapy for red‚ and green colour blindness in adult primates." (2009, Nature 461), which involved turning 2-color visioned squirrel monkey 3-colored.

 

Interesting idea to "cure" colorblindness, and possibly elevate the rest of us regular humans to the tetrachromat level some women have.

If you did this, you’d have to also elevate most of our printers and video screens to use 4 colors too, or they wouldn’t look right to us.

 

I’ve often wondered why I’ve never heard of an animal with vision build like a spectrometer, with a diffracting lens shining light on a long strip or receptors to give effectively infinite number of colors, “perfect” color vision. I guess there’s just not much survival value in such near perfection.

 

If I could get a 4th color receptor, I think I’d not go for just a more refined sense of color, but something like the infrared receptors on a pit viper. Behind the eye’s focusing lense, I think we’d get much better “heat vision” than a pit viper. It would be handy being able to get around in unlit rooms, and being able to visually avoid touching burning hot stuff would save wear-and-tear on our fingers. :)

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Whether electric powered transducers or pistol shrimp a creating little stars depends on whether by “star” you mean “something that emits light” or “something that fuses light elements into heavy”.

 

A sufficiently powerful compression in a fluid certainly emits light – Sonoluminesces. But whether these “little stars” are, like normal sized ones, bubble fusing, or just, like a incandescent light bulb, glowing, is questionable.

 

Bubble fusion is a neat idea, but its science is messy and full or fraud and disgrace. I don’t think it’s in principle impossible – a nearly perfectly spherical collapsing cavitation bubble is not all that different from the nearly perfectly spherical inward-directed fission explosion of a fusion bomb – but its literature suggests that for the usual about 0.00004 m bubbles made by transducers and shrimp, fusion is very rare to non-existent.

 

I think you’re confusing your primates – the great apes already have 3-color vision, likely nearly identical to us Homo Sapiens. I don’t know if anyone’s shown that 4-color vision occurs in female apes, but given that their chromosomes are very like ours (it’s not entirely clear if Homo Sapiens couldn’t breed with Pan Troglodytes and the like, or if, like lions can breed with tigers, given unnatural (and awfully unethical) conditions, we could), am pretty sure it does.

 

Most new world monkeys are, like most non-primate mammals, only 2-colored, with 3-colored vision occurring in some females. I think the color-blindness curing gene therapy experiments you’re speaking of is from K. Mancuso, W. W. Hauswirth, et al's "Gene therapy for red‚ and green colour blindness in adult primates." (2009, Nature 461), which involved turning 2-color visioned squirrel monkey 3-colored.

 

If you did this, you’d have to also elevate most of our printers and video screens to use 4 colors too, or they wouldn’t look right to us.

 

I’ve often wondered why I’ve never heard of an animal with vision build like a spectrometer, with a diffracting lens shining light on a long strip or receptors to give effectively infinite number of colors, “perfect” color vision. I guess there’s just not much survival value in such near perfection.

 

If I could get a 4th color receptor, I think I’d not go for just a more refined sense of color, but something like the infrared receptors on a pit viper. Behind the eye’s focusing lense, I think we’d get much better “heat vision” than a pit viper. It would be handy being able to get around in unlit rooms, and being able to visually avoid touching burning hot stuff would save wear-and-tear on our fingers. :)

http://www.newsweek.com/2015/05/22/cure-color-blindness-isnt-just-monkey-business-330258.html

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/notrocketscience/2009/09/16/gene-therapy-gives-full-colour-vision-to-colour-blind-monkeys/

Yup Yup.

 

 

https://theneurosphere.com/2015/12/17/the-mystery-of-tetrachromacy-if-12-of-women-have-four-cone-types-in-their-eyes-why-do-so-few-of-them-actually-see-more-colours/

 

Being able to see only a single line (either vertical or horizontal) wouldn't be that useful, even if that line was able to receive along a wider spectrum. I suppose that could be ameliorated by scanning against that "line" at high speed, but i'd wonder at focal length and light sensitivity being fast enough at the speeds I'd imagine would be necessary. Just seems the tunnel-vision would be too great to be as useful as wider scope but lower fidelity. Maybe as a "secondary" set of eyes, like arachnids seem to have.

 

On your heat-vision: vipers are cold blooded, you are not. Good luck seeing things with your own body heat triggering them from behind. :) Also, Infrared doesn't consider visible spectrum clear materials to be clear. Your eyes are likely opaque to that spectra. ultraviolet on the other hand, that one could be useful. As eyeballs and testis already form resonant cavities for radar that might be a better bet too. I'm serious, some repair-techs already use "ball ache" or "eye jiggle" to locate leaky spots on wave-guides.

 

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