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I also think that looking at these videos can help:

That's a great sentiment, but that's not what is lacking.  The reason this hasn't been done before is not that a dedicated group of game designers and testers and managers haven't come together to mak

@TheSoloPlayer yes im sure laser would decresse heat but im sure it would harm human too. VR shouldnt be harmfull for human body. Heating problem is for any device but for add laser for cooling cpu fi

  • 5 months later...

Slow, but yes. You interested in helping out with something?

I don't know about him, but I might be. But of course I won't offer help for things I wouldn't actually be able to do. I am a programmer, fluent in Java but willing to do other languages if needed. I'll have to learn them before I finish my degree in Computer Science anyway.

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I don't know about him, but I might be. But of course I won't offer help for things I wouldn't actually be able to do. I am a programmer, fluent in Java but willing to do other languages if needed. I'll have to learn them before I get my degree in Computer Science anyway.

Same here. Im trying to be fluent in a language my friend introduced me to (lua) and after i plan to expand into java and c#. I plan to pursue my computer science degree as well and to hopefully make this nerve gear be a reality.

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Same here. Im trying to be fluent in a language my friend introduced me to (lua) and after i plan to expand into java and c#. I plan to pursue my computer science degree as well and to hopefully make this nerve gear be a reality.

Yeah, honestly I don't have any experience outside of Java, I've been learning it for 3 years now on a university level but nobody uses it for high intensity tasks like graphics or data crunching. I really need to learn c++ to do anything.

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Yeah, honestly I don't have any experience outside of Java, I've been learning it for 3 years now on a university level but nobody uses it for high intensity tasks like graphics or data crunching. I really need to learn c++ to do anything.

Yeah i figured. Intense game engines like Unreal use c++ and unity has c#. Both are powerful languages. I want to be a renaissance man when it comes to coding languages. I dont know what language to start next but im leaning towards c#. What would you recommend? Im still trying to learning and applying lua in an engine but i plan to move from it one day. 

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Yeah i figured. Intense game engines like Unreal use c++ and unity has c#. Both are powerful languages. I want to be a renaissance man when it comes to coding languages. I dont know what language to start next but im leaning towards c#. What would you recommend? Im still trying to learning and applying lua in an engine but i plan to move from it one day. 

c++ is industry standard, having good functionality and performance with relatively decent security. A newer and good language would be Visual Basic, but I don't believe that it's royalty free if you try to monetize your work. All in all there are many languages, likely some that I've never even heard of. They all exist to fill a role and you just need to know what that role is! Java is a great high level language due to its versatility and accessibility. But other than that it lacks compared to other languages in almost every regard. But I would suggest Java if you are a beginner.

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Same here. Im trying to be fluent in a language my friend introduced me to (lua) ...

Lua looks like the much older (1963) BASIC language to me. There are uncounted numbers of BASIC-like languages, the one closest in feel to the original arguably Python, the most ubiquitous I think VBA, the scripting language built into most things Microsoft.

 

I’ve never tried Lua, but I suspect that, like BASIC and Python, it’s a good “prototyping” language, in which you can quickly write and try out programs, which you then rewrite in faster or better hardware-suited languages. For about 10 years, BASIC was my most used language, ‘til I switched to the obscure but powerful MUMPS

 

... and after i plan to expand into java and c#. I plan to pursue my computer science degree as well and to hopefully make this nerve gear be a reality.

My advice as someone who’s been programming for 40 years is to expand into every language, not only widely implemented ones, but anything you can imagine. The best language for a given programming goal is often one you create specifically for that problem. Common c[++] and Java compilers have features (macros in c, frameworks in Java) that allow something like this, but in my experience, it’s often easier and better to write a new language interpreter or compiler than to use such features.

 

Care is needed in studying Computer Science, as there are at least 2 family of tracks in the academic discipline: a practical “become an IT pro” and a more abstract “become a CS academic.” The abstract, mathematically formal stuff often seems silly and impractical, but I’ve increasingly come to value it, and wish I’d been more appreciative of it when I was in school.

 

Yeah i figured. Intense game engines like Unreal use c++ and unity has c#. Both are powerful languages. I want to be a renaissance man when it comes to coding languages. I dont know what language to start next but im leaning towards c#. What would you recommend? Im still trying to learning and applying lua in an engine but i plan to move from it one day.

I personally feel c#, the .NET framework, and the CLI, is a bad idea, and should be avoided. That said, knowing them well makes one attractive to employers heavily invested in them. I don’t think working with them is good for one’s personal development as a programmer. As I don’t understand them well, though, so I might be very wrong in this opinion.

 

c and c++ are essentiall languages. Every programmer should know them well.

 

c++ is industry standard, having good functionality and performance with relatively decent security.

Since c++ compilers are also c compilers, and a c compile and a linker can create practically any machine executable program, I wouldn’t say c++ has, intrinsically, any security at all. Every or nearly every important security scheme can be included in a c program, though, so I’d say that c++ can have the best possible security.

 

A newer and good language would be Visual Basic, but I don't believe that it's royalty free if you try to monetize your work.

Visual Basic is actually older (first appeared 1991) than Java (1995). It’s been unsupported since 2008, making it arguable a dead language

 

All in all there are many languages, likely some that I've never even heard of. They all exist to fill a role and you just need to know what that role is! Java is a great high level language due to its versatility and accessibility. But other than that it lacks compared to other languages in almost every regard. But I would suggest Java if you are a beginner.

I find Java, and strictly object-oriented languages in general, more difficult beginner languages than BASIC-like ones.

 

The great strength of Java and Java-like languages is portability. Any computer with a Java Virtual Machine can run any but a very weird Java program. Java is so popular that nearly every computer one’s likely to encounter has a JVM.

 

Moderatorly PS: If there are no objections, I’ll split these latest posts to their own topic, since they’re a discussion of computer languages and CS education, not 17Robot’s stuff.

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Lua looks like the much older (1963) BASIC language to me. There are uncounted numbers of BASIC-like languages, the one closest in feel to the original arguably Python, the most ubiquitous I think VBA, the scripting language built into most things Microsoft.

 

I’ve never tried Lua, but I suspect that, like BASIC and Python, it’s a good “prototyping” language, in which you can quickly write and try out programs, which you then rewrite in faster or better hardware-suited languages. For about 10 years, BASIC was my most used language, ‘til I switched to the obscure but powerful MUMPS

 

My advice as someone who’s been programming for 40 years is to expand into every language, not only widely implemented ones, but anything you can imagine. The best language for a given programming goal is often one you create specifically for that problem. Common c[++] and Java compilers have features (macros in c, frameworks in Java) that allow something like this, but in my experience, it’s often easier and better to write a new language interpreter or compiler than to use such features.

 

Care is needed in studying Computer Science, as there are at least 2 family of tracks in the academic discipline: a practical “become an IT pro” and a more abstract “become a CS academic.” The abstract, mathematically formal stuff often seems silly and impractical, but I’ve increasingly come to value it, and wish I’d been more appreciative of it when I was in school.

 

I personally feel c#, the .NET framework, and the CLI, is a bad idea, and should be avoided. That said, knowing them well makes one attractive to employers heavily invested in them. I don’t think working with them is good for one’s personal development as a programmer. As I don’t understand them well, though, so I might be very wrong in this opinion.

 

c and c++ are essentiall languages. Every programmer should know them well.

 

Since c++ compilers are also c compilers, and a c compile and a linker can create practically any machine executable program, I wouldn’t say c++ has, intrinsically, any security at all. Every or nearly every important security scheme can be included in a c program, though, so I’d say that c++ can have the best possible security.

 

Visual Basic is actually older (first appeared 1991) than Java (1995). It’s been unsupported since 2008, making it arguable a dead language

 

I find Java, and strictly object-oriented languages in general, more difficult beginner languages than BASIC-like ones.

 

The great strength of Java and Java-like languages is portability. Any computer with a Java Virtual Machine can run any but a very weird Java program. Java is so popular that nearly every computer one’s likely to encounter has a JVM.

 

Moderatorly PS: If there are no objections, I’ll split these latest posts to their own topic, since they’re a discussion of computer languages and CS education, not 17Robot’s stuff.

 

I mean im using lua in an engine very well. Updates every Thursday. I should Also mention im not using a complete authentic version of lua. its a sandboxed version called rbxlua. I guess the code seems simple but it takes a lot of skill to try and create anything new. There are so many languages out there and I honestly dont know what to do after im done with lua. I feel like heading towards game and app development for now and might move towards a more advanced engines such as cryengine, Unreal Engine, or  unity in the near future. 

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  • 2 months later...

well I would love to join, because I've been thinking about full dive system for about a year doing a little research and research in medical technology because its brain and movement, senses, and others. but im still "young" I cant join any company yet unless I have amazing intelligence or nice way to promote or speak. but I think Im just going to help a bit from the forums.

 

so what I found is now they already create some amazing tech for vr and also for medical. people who lost his or her hand can be replaced with a robotic one ( which might cost a lot) and how do they move their new hand is brain. and also there is brain control for things. example you can move a wheel chair ( auto ones) using ur brain and u don't need to move. its very nice to see how technology are moving rapidly from 2D games to 3D games and now they have 4D games (which is rare because void(the company) just done making it in 2016-2017). but I don't think those will help because full dive is a lot more complicated and if u done making it with a affordable price, sales will be easy because there is a lot of people waiting for it

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Welp. Guys we may not have to do the hard work for this stuff at all. Elon Musk recently started a new company called NueraLink designed to connect brains and computers. If they do end up designing this, work for nervegear may actually be easier than expected. It's crazy to think that this might actually be a reality soon! Get your engineering kits ready guys!

 

https://www.neuralink.com/

http://waitbutwhy.com/2017/04/neuralink.html

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  • 8 months later...

Welp. Guys we may not have to do the hard work for this stuff at all. Elon Musk recently started a new company called NueraLink designed to connect brains and computers. If they do end up designing this, work for nervegear may actually be easier than expected. It's crazy to think that this might actually be a reality soon! Get your engineering kits ready guys!

 

https://www.neuralink.com/

http://waitbutwhy.com/2017/04/neuralink.html

i'm happy to see that there is an actual company has come up with this specific intent id actually be willing to be a guinea pig for them -3- 

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