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I would not mind helping in both areas. This would be a learning and new innovative experience for me so you can definitely count me in! 

Is the research still going on to see how we can play with the rain without being invasive? I haven't seen many updates on this forum since last year. Im hoping everyone is still on board with this idea. This is a huge project and this group is getting bigger. I have the feeling we will be successful in our efforts and will bear the fruits of our labor and time in this. This group needs to make some huge chat or something  maybe on skype, teamspeak, or etc... We need to be able to communicate back and forth and share our ideas with each other. Wishing everyone luck

- TrollD3

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Seems good... Though I still have doubts about showing multiple things such as replicating physics in a VR world in real time such as getting a ball to fall in full color image. The human Eye has over 576 mega pixels of view. The resolution Is also a bit worrying. The device would probably need to be connected to a fast computer with several 4.0 GHz processors.

Some notes -

 

Eye "resolution" doesn't have much meaning.  You have that sort of spatial resolution in your fovea but far less than that on the outer parts of your field of view.  Also, most of the information that reaches your brain is not pixels - it is edge detection, motion detection, corner detection etc information that has already been processed by your retina.

 

In addition there is currently no technology that allows you to access neural pathways that way.  The best anyone has done is to generate a limited "field of view" in someone's visual center by implanting electrodes directly on the brain.  But even that doesn't work well because there is no 1:1 mapping of visual information to a location in the brain.

 

So it's a cool idea but you have some very basic biological barriers to overcome before you even start thinking about processor speeds.

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While invasive wiring would probably not be the best method for the final product (both from a marketing and personal standpoint), we should seriously consider using it for testing, and alpha development, and maybe for the beta testing too. Direct connection with the brain will have a greater ability to get accurate readings, and we can work around electrode impedance as well as the fact that current equipment cannot read the brain to the standard most people predict is needed (I only say predict because it hasn't been tested yet).

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  • 2 weeks later...

As long as everyone stays committed to this, it can become reality. I hope everyone is still very interested in doing this. This technology will definitely change the world. All of us would be a piece of history.  We should all meet one day in the future and try to do this together. I dont know how just communicating through web is going to help us much.

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As long as everyone stays committed to this, it can become reality.

That's a great sentiment, but that's not what is lacking.  The reason this hasn't been done before is not that a dedicated group of game designers and testers and managers haven't come together to make it.  It is because the basic technology doesn't exist.  Not because people don't care, or because OSes aren't good enough, or processors aren't fast enough - but because it's not there yet and is very, very difficult to develop.

 

Someday we will have neural interfaces as described above.  But they will come from labs at Stanford, UCSD, MIT and Caltech - not from a game house, even if those game designers are really dedicated.  And they will come slowly, with the first interfaces being used to treat disease and restore function, not for playing games.  If you want to hasten that day, then getting into a good biomed or EE program at a school working on such things is your best bet.  You will get to work with leaders in the field, and someday perhaps contribute yourself to the research.

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  • 2 weeks later...

That's a great sentiment, but that's not what is lacking.  The reason this hasn't been done before is not that a dedicated group of game designers and testers and managers haven't come together to make it.  It is because the basic technology doesn't exist.  Not because people don't care, or because OSes aren't good enough, or processors aren't fast enough - but because it's not there yet and is very, very difficult to develop.

 

Someday we will have neural interfaces as described above.  But they will come from labs at Stanford, UCSD, MIT and Caltech - not from a game house, even if those game designers are really dedicated.  And they will come slowly, with the first interfaces being used to treat disease and restore function, not for playing games.  If you want to hasten that day, then getting into a good biomed or EE program at a school working on such things is your best bet.  You will get to work with leaders in the field, and someday perhaps contribute yourself to the research.

 

Not entirely true. For example, the 'reading' part of it is pretty much done(We just need a more advanced version of the EEGs). The only thing really holding us back is the 'writing' part.

 

But I do have to agree with your second paragraph though. We can't go straight into Nerve Gear for games. We'll never get taken seriously and won't get funding which we will probably need.

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Not entirely true. For example, the 'reading' part of it is pretty much done(We just need a more advanced version of the EEGs).

We're not even close to that level.  An EEG gives you very gross neural activity.  It answers questions like "are a lot of neurons firing?  Are a few?  Are any?"

 

It's like listening to a car drive by on a freeway.  Can you listen and tell if the car is moving or stopped?  Usually.  Can you tell what part of memory the car's computer is using, or where its navigation system is directing the driver?  No.

 

Can we do better?  Certainly.  But again, that research will come from universities, not from an engineering tweak to an EEG.

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We're not even close to that level.  An EEG gives you very gross neural activity.  It answers questions like "are a lot of neurons firing?  Are a few?  Are any?"

 

It's like listening to a car drive by on a freeway.  Can you listen and tell if the car is moving or stopped?  Usually.  Can you tell what part of memory the car's computer is using, or where its navigation system is directing the driver?  No.

 

Can we do better?  Certainly.  But again, that research will come from universities, not from an engineering tweak to an EEG.

 

Hmm, perhaps. But take a look at this article:

http://neurosciencenews.com/finger-movement-prosthetic-bmi-3669/

 

It seems to me that they do have a very good EEG(sort of), or am I missing something?

 

I do agree with you that progress will be done in universities and labs.

 

 

That again may be true. However, are we even sure that there are actually college professors and students studying this? I feel that the least that we can do is try to bring this to their attention.

 

Well, when/if we do present it, we can't present it as a game. Each part(reading, writing, e.t.c) of the Nerve Gear needs to be indvidually researched.

I don't think your idea of a company that just does the nerve gear will work. A better idea, i think, would be to have a group of neuroscientists, all close in contact, working on different parts of the Nerve Gear.

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