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I like everyone else has taken the SAT exam. Has anyone ever wondered, is this really a proper measure of intelligence? The idea that what school you will get into is based on what circle you color in has always befuddled me. There is little writing or anything based around individuals creativity, which is a key to intelligence. Also, there is almost no real problem solving outside of trying to figure out why Johnny left home with 6 apples and came back with 13.

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I like everyone else has taken the SAT exam. Has anyone ever wondered, is this really a proper measure of intelligence? The idea that what school you will get into is based on what circle you color in has always befuddled me. There is little writing or anything based around individuals creativity, which is a key to intelligence. Also, there is almost no real problem solving outside of trying to figure out why Johnny left home with 6 apples and came back with 13.

It was never my understanding that the SAT exam measured intelligence.  I always thought it more about testing if you can think in a particular way.

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I like everyone else has taken the SAT exam. Has anyone ever wondered, is this really a proper measure of intelligence? The idea that what school you will get into is based on what circle you color in has always befuddled me. There is little writing or anything based around individuals creativity, which is a key to intelligence. Also, there is almost no real problem solving outside of trying to figure out why Johnny left home with 6 apples and came back with 13.

The SAT exam is not really a proper measure of intelligence because it only tests knowledge of relatively simple concepts and ideas; further, its capacity to measure a student’s ability in the use of accumulated specialised knowledge is limited. The bottom line is SAT scores are a limited measure of cognitive abilities and can also vary considerably due to a student’s level of preparation and educational experiences.   That said; the scores are probably the best means available to the education system.

If I may be so bold, I would like to add that SAT scores can be useful to evaluate ones strengths and weaknesses, bearing in mind that they often have little impact on career opportunities as work skills are often completely different to those needed for high SAT scores.

To keep exams in perspective, I recommend ‘The Magic of Thinking Big’ by David J. Schwartz’ ISBN 10 072250943X, or ISBN 13 9780722509432; a self-improvement book (green/orange cover). I found this book very inspirational many years ago when dealing with exam worries.

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