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Electron/shell Jumping In The Elements


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  • 5 months later...

When electrons are added to the nuclei of atoms, the electron fill the orbitals, with each level of orbitals having room for up to so many electrons. The middle number of sulfur of 8 is the upper limit with no more room to make 9. That ninth electron would need to get kicked up to the next level to get 6 because there is room there. The same is true of aluminum with 8 maximum in the middle layer. 

Edited by HydrogenBond
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When electrons are added to the nuclei of atoms, the electron fill the orbitals, with each level of orbitals having room for up to so many electrons. The middle number of sulfur of 8 is the upper limit with no more room to make 9. That ninth electron would need to get kicked up to the next level to get 6 because there is room there. The same is true of aluminum with 8 maximum in the middle layer. 

I did realize this after it was posted :blush:.

 

What perhaps I should have asked, Is what would be the change in

 

Yttrium from 2 8 18 9 2 to 2 8 18 8 3 which I believe they once where

 

also 

 

Lanthanium from 2 8 18 18 9 2  to 2 8 18 18 8 3

 

having higher energy fields in valence shells. 

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  • 4 months later...

I did realize this after it was posted :blush:.

 

What perhaps I should have asked, Is what would be the change in

 

Yttrium from 2 8 18 9 2 to 2 8 18 8 3 which I believe they once where

 

also 

 

Lanthanium from 2 8 18 18 9 2  to 2 8 18 18 8 3

 

having higher energy fields in valence shells. 

 

It would change to a different material.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Not so. The number of neutrons in the nucleus determines what material (element) the atom is. Changing the number of electrons would convert the atom to an ion.

The number/amount of electrons are the same, Still equal to number of protons. 

only the outer two shells going from 9,2 to 8,3, more energy in valence shells.

 

 

An ion (/ˈən, -ɒn/)[1] is an atom or molecule in which the total number of electrons is not equal to the total number of protons, giving the atom or molecule a net positive or negative electrical charge.

I wondered about these electron sequences after my attempt at extending the periodic table following electron sequences, Which I must admit at the time I knew little about, But followed what I believed was the sequence, it was only after I had finished that I found the electron sequences for each element that I realized my sequences did not quite following the known sequences, the only difference was in the outer two shells,

 

MY FIRST EXTENDED TABLE, Plus joining of two table, electrons/positrons, Supersymmetry?

 TABLE WITH ELECTRONS CORRECTED TO WHAT THEY ARE NOW.

 

SHOWN IN PURPLE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TWO TABLES

 

This led me to believe that the joining of "tables" led to the difference in valence shells, a place where energies where exchanged between tables.

Which I know believe are top quarks, with joining of the tables each opposing elements have a combined mass of 173Gev.

http://alpha-omega-sunshaker.blogspot.co.uk/2014/12/top-quark-condensate.html

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The number/amount of electrons are the same, Still equal to number of protons.

Take an atom, Change the number of neutrons it becomes a different element. Change the number of electrons it becomes an ion. In the context of the discussion it is irrelevant that neutral atoms have the same number of electrons and protons.

 

Edit: mea culpa. Obviously that should read "Change the number of protons........" Thanks to JMJones for spotting my silly error.

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Take an atom, Change the number of neutrons it becomes a different element. Change the number of electrons it becomes an ion. In the context of the discussion it is irrelevant that neutral atoms have the same number of electrons and protons.

I may be misunderstanding, but  the number of neutrons/electrons/protons have not changed, If atoms lose or gain electrons they become ions?,

 

I was seeing it more as atoms in excited states, a different form of matter.

 

 

An atom in a high excited state is termed Rydberg atom. A system of highly excited atoms can form a long-lived condensed excited state e.g. a condensed phase made completely of excited atoms: Rydberg matter.
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Take an atom, Change the number of neutrons it becomes a different element. Change the number of electrons it becomes an ion. In the context of the discussion it is irrelevant that neutral atoms have the same number of electrons and protons.

I assume you meant proton, not neutron.  Changing the number of neutrons would create a different isotope.  Sunshaker isn't talking about changing the number of electrons, though.  The question was about moving electrons to different electron shells.

 

It's been a long time since chemistry classes for me, but since no one's yet answered the question, I'll give it a shot.

 

It takes energy to move an electron to a higher shell, and this state is highly unstable.  Eventually, the electron will move back down to a lower energy state and release a photon equal to the energy difference between the two electron shells.  This was discovered by Niels Bohr and is called flourescence

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