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Confucious Says


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I object to your placement of that object. I think it would look better elsewhere.

 

Pour me a shot, please. I'm depressed that I missed such an easy shot on the eight ball. Also could use some courage before I head to the clinic to get my flu shot. What kind of shot are you using in that twelve guage?

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as usual the structure the author has given this thread is a gallimaufry to put it kindly. (kindly not being my first choice as y'all might imagine.) nevertheless, the op gives examples of homonyms and we have a thread on that topic. here's a link to the last post: Homonyms and Their Grammatical Heirs

 

when one pays a visit it is for the purpose of wasting other people's time, not one's own. :phones:

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In the spirit of the difficulties of learning English here is a story.

 

The foregin student in London had just spent the day in class learning about the anomalies of the pronounciation of ough words. Cough, through, though, etc. Walking past a theatre he saw a poster promoting the current play. It read - Hamlet, Pronounced Success. So he went home and shot himself.

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Homophones (sound-alike words) and Homonyms (sound and spelled-alike) are, IMHO, more obvious scapegoats for criticism of spoken and written language than real problems, as people fluent in the language easily distinguish them from context. They do pose a real difficulty for non-native speakers learning the language, or native speakers learning to read it, but less of a difficulty than mastering the essential syntax, conjugations rules, and rote memorizing vocabulary.

 

Homonyms make for good, often deligfully subtle jokes.

The foreign student in London had just spent the day in class learning about the anomalies of the pronunciation of ough words. Cough, through, though, etc. Walking past a theatre he saw a poster promoting the current play. It read - Hamlet, Pronounced Success. So he went home and shot himself.

I’ve not heard that one before – thanks, Eclogite. :)

 

We’ll begin with box, the plural is boxes,

But the plural of ox is oxen, not oxes.

...

I don’t have a ready reference, but know that irregular plurals generally indicate the familiarity and importance of their referents. Thus the plural of man is not mans, but men, person people, not persons. J. R. R. Tolkien, an trained linguist, was well aware of this, and famously used it to excellent effect in his Middle Earth novels: The plural of elf, or dwarf, which in standard English is elfs and dwarfs, he wrote in his novels "elves" and "dwarves", to emphasize their importance as true races, rather than supernatural beings or deformed humans. (pondering why the plural of hobbit is the regular hobbits is left as an exercise for the reader ;)) One can do the opposite, to trivialize and objectify a usually important referent, for example, calling men “mans”.

 

A panda bear is not a bear – it’s a racoon’s relative

:Exclamati: A biology, not a science point, but hypography being a science site, this can’t be let to stand: though 20+ years ago there was some controversy about its genetic relationship to other living animals, the Giant Panda is now almost without exception among biologists believed to be a member of bear (Ursidae) family, not the Racoon (Procyonidae) family.

 

PS: Why is this thread titled “Confucious (sic) says”? :confused:

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