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Know How To Make Sawdust Crete Blocks


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I know someone living in Siberia, (no, this is not a joke) who is trying to find another route for affordable housing by building homes using a monolithic concept, that is the weight carrying materials of the wall also be the insulator. For this to be accomplished the building material has to have a relatively high R value, be sealable (to prevent drafts) and be fire resistant. He said, "I am currently working with trying to get a recipe for sawdust crete (mixing sawdust and cement) as well as adding acids and bases to produce a highly porous mass. Ideally blocks of this material would be both inexpensive and good insulators."

He also said, "The basic ingredients to polyurethane foam insulation are simple, but the know how on producing it does not seem to be common. I can get the chemicals pretty easily here (Russia knows how to do chemicals!!) but I'm at a dead end as to what the proportions are or at least some rudimentary schematics of the production process. Any help from practical experience, contacts or suggested reading would be VERY appreciated!!"

I thought I would try here to see if anyone has some ideas or first hand know how that I can pass onto him. thanks

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Hi debdives,

 

I thought I would try here to see if anyone has some ideas or first hand know how that I can pass onto him. thanks

 

I worked in a laboratory for geotechnical and materials testing engineers many years ago and the best way is the suck it and see approach. Just like determining the optimum moisture content for macadam road base, try different mixes (of water and gravel) compress them equally into a mould, measure their density, test their compression strength, measure their moisture content and plot the results of all of your test samples with regards to moisture and compression strength to find the optimum mix.

 

We tested all types of mud bricks (straw, mud and cement) as well as concrete cylinders and drilling samples. Some of the mud brick type designs are as basic as cement rendered hay bales but many were also reinforced with structural spikes through the bales/bricks anchored from the footings into a lightweight roof level frame that took the weight of the roof.

 

In cold places with thermafrost you could build underground with almost anything as long as it was sealed, couldn't catch fire and was insulated from the cold ground.

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