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Physics for my lightsaber...


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The blade is 300 centimeters of a one million degree Fº magnetic arc of plasma (ergo super heated plasma flowing in the same direction as a 1.5 meter long blade shaped magnetic field up 1.5 meters and back down 1.5 meters into the battery constantly for as long as the blade is ignited). I want to know how much power (4.8 Watts every P) to put into the battery of my hilt so I can decide how long the battery will have to be charged for by a normal sized steam turbine (found in a nuclear power plant) so I will know how much money it costs to make a real lightsaber.

 

Don't do the math for me, just please tell me the mass (in kilograms of course) of one centimeter of the element plasma when heated to one million degrees Fº.

 

A one million degree blade is not practical in an oxygen rich environment because the plasma would transfer it's immense heat from air molecules to the cells of your body as it passes through the oxygen. Your flesh would literally combust into flames without making contact with the plasma.

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Believe it or not the heat and luminosity created from such an arc could be harnessed by photovoltaic panels and used to vaporize water, and this pressurized vapor could be used to push an electric turbine, resulting in an entirely new, self sustaining, longer lasting eco friendly version of the nuclear power plant that was used to charge the battery of my original lightsaber. I believe it's called arc fusion and it is believed to be theorized as the most efficient power source for any space ship we might use in the future.

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Several things come to mind, how do you limit it to just 1.5 meters? What confines the blade to that length? What kind of battery can be small enough to tote around and still contain that much energy (if you know you could be rich) But most importantly to the wielder of the blade is how do they survive the gamma rays and neutrons given off by the 1,000,000 degree fusion arc blade?

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Several things come to mind, how do you limit it to just 1.5 meters? What confines the blade to that length? What kind of battery can be small enough to tote around and still contain that much energy (if you know you could be rich) But most importantly to the wielder of the blade is how do they survive the gamma rays and neutrons given off by the 1,000,000 degree fusion arc blade?

 

Good questions, to find the answers in my lifetime I'll need the equivalent of the Gross Domestic Product of The United States of America, preferably in a plethora wareshouses filled to maximum capacity with rows of stacked one hundred dollar bills.

 

Then with the vastness of the hundred dollar bills I don't use, I'll become the CEO of a company that manufactures real life custom lightsabers and sales them to Star Wars fans for a fortune.

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One million degrees F = 555,265 K Emissivity varies as the fourth power of the absolute temperature, Stephan-Boltzmann law. Work out your silly power dissipation,

 

R = e(sigma)(T^4)

 

where:

 

R = radiated power, watts/cm^2

e = emissivity, 0-1

sigma = 5.6703 x 10^(-12) watt/cm^2-T^4

T = absolute temperature

 

You will also be curious about its wavelength emission maximum, Wien's displacement law,

 

lambda(max) = [2.898x10^(-3)] m/T

0.29 cm/(555,265 K) = 0.522x10^(-6) cm = 5.22 nm, 238 eV/photon

 

We call those "x-rays." Chemical bonds top off at 3 eV. Run the numbers. Stooopid results for any empirical plasma emissivity.

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