Jump to content
Science Forums

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 344
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Operational notes: the Wildflower social group has more or less died on the vine so to speak (:doh:), and as wildflowers have my current attention this new thread seems suiting. since all flowers ulti

Using FF too, and the link wors for me.   Little off topic. I'm not a great fan of roses, but find the "old", "native" rose species, which has a more simple flower structure than garden roses, quite

alas i still have not made it afield, but maybe tomorrow. still, i didn't have to trek any further than my backyard for this captive native. i first encountered it in my exploration and study of lecht

Posted Images

it is awsome kewl!!! :xparty: how would you like to collaborate with me and write our own app for wildflowers? :ideamaybenot: just a thought. :lol: but, which thought prompted me to get off my skinny stamen and go out and pluck some leaves, flowers, and seed pods and make a scan @200dpi. :clue: these are the primary leaves which are basal and differently shaped than the secondary leaves apparent in my previous photos.(i know there's a technical term for the "secondary" but it slips my mind. :wilted:)

 

submitted for your consideration. :coffee_n_pc:

 

Wish I had time to work on an app like that...we would have to hire people and outsource to India...not worth the trouble considering they plan to have an Android version later this year. ;)

 

I think "secondary leaves" would just be called leaves. :P

You have basal leaves, leaves, and the various other forms of leaflets.

That's the only leaf terminology I'm familiar with, but perhaps there is more?

 

In any case, between the scan and the previous photos, there's more than enough to go on. :sherlock:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

haven't gone photo'ing afield yet, but for this flower i don't have to. :photos: i have posted it at least once before but i have some new info. these are growing in my native plant bed and i collected one -after securing permission from the forest service- in gifford pinchot national forest along the e. fork lewis river. the first time i photographed them i misidentified them as wooly pussytoes, and while i have the id correct now it seems burke herbarium has added info on 3 subspecies/varieties. these flowers spread not only by seed but by creeping rhizomes as well and from my single plant collected i now have 8. the plants are sub-dioecious, meaning that sometimes the flowers appear before the leaves and sometimes with the leaves. all of mine have the former habit. (the leaves in the whole plant view belong to other plants in the bed such as wild strawberry, fringecup, pacific bleeding heart, and pacific waterleaf.)

 

arctic sweet coltsfoot @ burke herbarium

 

arctic sweet coltsfoot - Petasites frigidus var. palmatus (aka sweet coltsfoot, alpine butterbur, arctic butterbur

april 9, 2012

native wildflower garden

clark county washington - native

 

whole-plant(s) view:

 

blooms:

Edited by Turtle
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

alas i still have not made it afield, but maybe tomorrow. still, i didn't have to trek any further than my backyard for this captive native. i first encountered it in my exploration and study of lechtenberg forest, and because the petals are so very very quickly deciduous -i.e. they fall off almost as soon as they emerge- i spent at least a year trying to identify what for all the world looked like a 3-petaled flower. even captive, this is the case as you can see below. i finally pinned it down using my Flora of the Pacific Northwest by keying on the shape & size of the hooks on the seed-heads. :clue: as so often is the case, the devil is in the details.

 

woodland buttercup @ burke herbarium

 

woodland buttercup -Ranunculus uncinatus (aka little buttercup)

april 26, 2012

native wildflower bed

clark county washington - native

:photos:

blooms:

 

leaves:

 

seed-head:

Edited by Turtle
Link to post
Share on other sites

another native that i hold captive. i don't recall seeing any in the wild growing this vigorously, but then of course mine is pampered. now that i have my pics, i'm going to eat some of it. :chef:

 

american yellow-rocket @burke herbrium

 

ethnobotanical use @university of michigan

Alaska Native Food (Vegetable)

Rosettes of dark green shiny leaves cooked as a green vegetable or eaten raw in a mixed salad.

 

american yellow-rocket -Barbarea orthoceras (aka american wintercress)

april 27, 2012

native wildflower bed

clark county washington -native

 

blooms:

 

whole-plant view:

 

leaf:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pitcher plant blooms

 

 

 

thanks for posting mantanmoom. i went looking at my old reliable burke herbarium site to see if we have these in washington state. yours appear to be yellow pitcherplant -Sarracenia flava, and while they are native to your area, they are not native here but have been introduced in Skagit county in northern washington. good stuff! (i mean good photo by you and good information from burke :thumbs_up; not so good that they have been introduced here. :thumbs_do)

 

yellow pitcher plant @ burke herbarium

 

last year i made a post on my volunteer native violets. they are now blooming o'plenty and i have attached a photo below. say cleistogamous! :D :photos:

if i told you that my early-blue violets -Viola adunca- were exhibiting cleistogamous tendencies, would you recoil in horror? :omg: smirkle in titillation? :rolleyes: scratch your head in puzzlement? :reallyconfused: me too! :hi:

 

anyway, as profuse as they have grown & spread, they stopped blooming months ago. or so i thought. all of a sudden the last couple weeks i have had many more maturing seed pods than i had seen flowers to account for. ?? enter cleistogomy; the ability of flowering plants to self-pollinate without ever opening a flower. :clue: who knew!? :turtle: :photos:

Link to post
Share on other sites

seems that when i'm ready to go afield, the weather is not. :rainumbrella: while i enjoy hiking in the rain, my camera equipment is not so tolerant. anyway, i'm biding my time looking through my archive to see what i have and what i need. i have by my count found, identified, and photographed about 1/4 of the 425 species of vascular plants that others have identified & reported in my county.

 

so, the buttercup below i found in '08 in Lechtenberg forest. while we have more than a dozen native species, this one is introduced from Europe.

 

creeping buttercup @ burke herbarium

 

creeping buttercup -Ranunculus repens

may 2008

lechtenberg forest

clark county washington - introduced

Link to post
Share on other sites

i spotted this in a county park and thought i recognized it as a native pacific dogwood from an earlier sighting up the columbia gorge. sure enough it is and this time i took a shot of the whole tree -about 15 feet tall- and a bark & leaf detail shot. :sherlock:

 

pacific dogwood @ burke herbarium

 

pacific dogwood -Cornus nuttallii (aka Nuttall's dogwood, mountain dogwood, western flowering dogwood)

may 2, 2012

county park

clark county washington -native

 

bloom:

 

whole tree view:

 

bark & leaf detail:

Link to post
Share on other sites

100 feet down the road was another native understory tree in bloom. i first found this in lechtenberg forest, but they were always too crowded and entangled in other growth to get a good "whole tree" shot. the berries are edible they say but i have yet to find any to try them out. best made into jams & jellies and used in pemikan by native americans i hear though.

 

whether i earlier overlooked the 5 subspecies or it's a new addition at burke, they are there now. :clue: i believe i have here subspecies/variety semiintegrifolia.

 

main page: saskatoon subspecies @ burke herbarium

 

variety page: variety semiintegrifolia @ burke herbarium

 

saskatoon -Amelanchier alnifolia var. semiintegrifolia (aka saskatoon seviceberry, western serviceberry)

may 2, 2012

county park

clark county washington -native

 

blooms:

 

whole tree:

 

leaf detail:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fireweed is the territorial flower of the Yukon.

 

Epilobium angustifolium, commonly known as Fireweed (mainly in North America), Great Willow-herb (Canada),[1] or Rosebay Willowherb (mainly in Britain), is a perennial herbaceous plant in the willowherb family Onagraceae. It is native throughout the temperate Northern Hemisphere, including large parts of the boreal forests.

 

***************************************************************************************************

 

The name Fireweed derives from the species' abundance as a coloniser on burnt sites after forest fires. Its tendency to quickly colonize open areas with little competition, such as sites of forest fires and forest clearings, makes it a clear example of a pioneer species. Plants grow and flower as long as there is open space and plenty of light, as trees and brush grow larger the plants die out, but the seeds remain viable in the soil seed bank for many years, when a new fire or other disturbance occurs that opens up the ground to light again the seeds germinate. Some areas with heavy seed counts in the soil, after burning, can be covered with pure dense stands of this species and when in flower the landscape is turned into fields of color.

 

http://en.wikipedia....m_angustifolium

 

Many people are familiar with the brilliant purple/pink spires of Fireweed in bloom, and when they go to seed, the fluffy white seeds are a startling contrast to the brilliant leaves and the fiery bloom. Fireweed is one of the earliest greens after the snow has receded and I pick a few of the tiny emerging fronds and add them to our salads when first they appear. They grow astonishingly fast and once they are more than 6 inches tall, it is better to boil them and serve them with a bit of seasoning for they soon turn bitter. I have a neighbor who is quite famous for her Fireweed Flower Jelly and other wild preserves.

 

The picture below was taken in September of 2009 and the horse is Chellum, whom I delivered to her new home in Tagish that day to become the partner of one of my young riding students.

 

Fireweed-and-Chellum.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

i rescued this from a ditch 2 seasons ago, but it didn't bloom last year and i didn't know if it would make it or what it was for sure. it made it, i now know for sure. :cap: :photos:

 

plumed solomon's seal @ burke herbarium

 

plumed solomon's seal -Maianthemum racemosum (aka feathery false lily-of-the-valley, plumed spikenard)

may 13, 2012

garden bed

clark county washington - native

 

blooms:

 

whole plant:

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a late, cool spring this year in the Yukon. Crocus did not appear until May 10th in our yard, while other years they have been out in profusion prior to the end of April. Last night the temperature dipped to -3C and when I fed the horses this morning, it was still only +2C and the poor crocuses were still shut tight against the cold, so no photo op. The following pictures are from a few years ago. The crocus blooms in clusters along the fences of the horse paddocks and the horses do not eat them. B)

 

This may be why....

 

 

pasqueflower

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. | 2011 | Copyright pasqueflower , name for two similar perennials of the family Ranunculaceae ( buttercup family). The Old World pasqueflower ( Anemone pulsatilla ) was so named because it blossoms around the Eastertime. The American pasqueflower ( A. patens ), named for its resemblance to the European species, is a bluish, open bell-shaped wildflower of the prairie regions of North America. As a herald of spring and a symbol of old age (from the silvery heads of feathery seeds), the plant has been made the subject of Plains Indian song and legend. It is the floral emblem of South Dakota. Patches of the flowers on their short, furry stems give an appearance of haze; for this reason the plant in the Great Plains region is called prairie smoke. Other names for the American variety are gosling flower, sandflower, windflower, wild crocus, and anemone. It contains a poison and is an irritant when fresh; the crushed leaves were applied by Native Americans as a counterirritant in cases of rheumatism and neuralgia. The pasqueflowers were formerly considered a separate genus ( Pulsatilla ) from the related true anemones. Pasqueflowers are classified in the division Magnoliophyta , class Magnoliopsida, order Ranunculales, family Ranunculaceae.

 

 

 

 

Crocus%252C-mountains.jpg

 

A closer picture of crocuses or croci, depending on your preference.

 

B0000711.jpg

 

 

Pulsatilla patens is a species of flowering plant in the family Ranunculaceae, native to Europe, Russia, Mongolia, China, Canada and the United States. Common names include Eastern pasqueflower, prairie smoke, prairie crocus, and cutleaf anemone.

 

Pulsatilla patens is the provincial flower of Manitoba, Canada[4] and (as P. hirsutissima) is the state flower of South Dakota, United States.

 

http://en.wikipedia....lsatilla_patens

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...