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Plasma Physics colleges in or around PA?


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Hello all,

 

Are there any such major as for Plasma Physics or Plasma is just an option? What are the different types of Physics minus Astronomy? Is astrophysics part astronomy and part physics? If so we can forget about astrophysics. What are some good public not private colleges for physics in or around the PA area? Thank you for any replies.

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Since I'm from Europe I can answer only one of your questions.

 

What astrophysics is, is best explained if you heard about General Relativity...that is used in theoretical Astrophysics or Cosmology is also Astrophysics.

In my understanding Astrophysics is the more theoretical part and astronomy the more experimental.

 

Different types of physics are (the first which come to my mind): Solid state physics, mesoscopical physics, statistical physics, mathematical physics, astrophysics, astronomy, particle physics, theoretical physics...

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Thank you for all the info. What kinds of Physics are majors without Astronomy, physics by itself? On physicsforums.com they told me that Plasma is for graduate not undergraduate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since I'm from Europe I can answer only one of your questions.

 

What astrophysics is, is best explained if you heard about General Relativity...that is used in theoretical Astrophysics or Cosmology is also Astrophysics.

In my understanding Astrophysics is the more theoretical part and astronomy the more experimental.

 

Different types of physics are (the first which come to my mind): Solid state physics, mesoscopical physics, statistical physics, mathematical physics, astrophysics, astronomy, particle physics, theoretical physics...

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Though I'm certainly biased because I attend Michigan State University, it is true they do have an excellent physics and astronomy program (it was top-ten ranked last time I checked). On top of that, they have the National Super Conducting Cyclotron Laboratory--a plus for anyone wanting to study physics, especially experimental physics. Though I do have to say, their "astrophysics" program is mostly a mix of physics and astronomy, with very few actual astrophysics classes. Check out the website

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Hello all,

 

Are there any such major as for Plasma Physics or Plasma is just an option? What are the different types of Physics minus Astronomy? Is astrophysics part astronomy and part physics? If so we can forget about astrophysics. What are some good public not private colleges for physics in or around the PA area? Thank you for any replies.

 

Yeah plasma physics you can only do this as a docterate in the UK dont know about US.

 

So in other words you have to get your physics degree first,

 

Peace

:)

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But that's not to say you can't take classes in plasma physics as an undergraduate! Plasma physics is definitely an area of high specialization; if one is going to be a physicist, one needs to have a large, broad knowledge of all physics, so it would seem rather pointless to make this a specialization for an undergraduate degree. If you're really interested in taking classes in plasma physics, take the AP Physics C tests and the BC Calculus test, so that way you can get a head start on physics and be taking junior or senior level classes your freshman and sophomore year and/or take graduate classes your junior and a senior year.

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