Jump to content
Science Forums

Recommended Posts

what is the value you place on E=MC2

 

c squared is the speed of light in vacuum, or 300,000,000 m/second, times itself. So it's a huge figure: 8.98755179*10^16 m^2/s^2. Using this as a constant in the equation means that E and m are variables, and the implication is that a *lot* of energy is yielded by a tiny amount of matter. It also takes a *lot* of energy to create matter.

 

The formula says nothing about the speed or method of conversion, nor does it give any values for E or m.

 

So the examples of 1 and 0 above are just figurative. Since E=mc^2 is basically the same as saying x=y, then 1=1 is *equally valid* - but it is not the *same* equation.

 

I'm probably just confusing this more so I'll shut up now. :pirate:

Link to post
Share on other sites
although there is a slightly philosophical twist to that one.
Slightly philosophical? :sherlock:

 

...the implication is that a *lot* of energy is yielded by a tiny amount of matter. It also takes a *lot* of energy to create matter.
No, it's that we use such tiny units of energy, except for those such as gramme, kilogramme etc.

 

Anyway the answer to the original question is: 1 according to the rest frame and more than 1 according to other frames.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...