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I just read about this simulation film entitled Mindstorm which allegedly puts you in the mind of a shizophrenic.

 

I then proceeded to watch a bit of the film and it was hilarious.

 

It showed a pizza squirming, and then you swipe the pizza off the table because of how weird it smells, and there are voices coming from both stereo channels.

 

The floor will start to swirl, the angles of your house might bend, the clouds will warble around gracefully and a grassy hill in the sunshine would look like an impressionist painting. This is just the eye of the schizo.

 

There's also the ear. A lot of schizos hear menacing voices.

 

Have you ever heard voices?

 

The point to this simulation is to help police and doctors better understand the schizo.

 

I believe we can learn more from the plant kingdom than from some silly little movie.

 

I've met and interacted with quite a few schizos and I've found that I can relate and understand them just because I've experienced what it's like.

Not by watching a movie,

but by partaking in what some like to call

an Ayahuasca ritual.

 

I believe DMT is playing a key role here, and what better way to understand a psychedelic mind than to be one?

 

What I'm getting at here is:

Schizos are tripping.

 

That statement is simple, but it's details are infinitely complex.

 

I'd now like to discuss and argue.

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Schizophrenia is a serious psychiatric illness that causes strange thinking, strange feelings, and unusual behavior. It is rare in children and is a severe illness that affects the child and family. The cause of schizophrenia is not known. Current research suggests a combination of brain changes, bio-chemical, genetic and environmental factors may be involved. Early diagnosis and medical treatment are important. Schizophrenia is a life-long disease and can be controlled but not cured. Children with schizophrenia need a comprehensive treatment plan. A combination of medication, individual therapy, family therapy, and specialized programs (school, activities, etc.) is often necessary. There are a few doctors and psychologists that have attempted to revive the therapeutic use of psychedelics. Some innovative scientists such as Gary Fisher PhD have been administering psychedelics to children suffering severe forms of psychological disturbance and finding remarkable results.

 

The hypothesis of these experiments is that psychosis is a massive defensive system of repression, avoidance, and denial in the assistance of protecting the individual from re-experiencing early childhood trauma. Sometimes the repression is so massive that the individual ceases to experience their self with any confidence. The individual exists isolated in a world without feelings and this world becomes meaningless. Psychedelic drugs were viewed as a powerful means of undermining an intractable defense system and thereby making the patient more receptive to contact and communication with others. It was hypothesized that the psychedelic drugs could break through this massive repression wherein the child would re-experience these traumatic events and release the pain bound to those experiences. He or she would acknowledge his own history. Also, with the loving attention of the staff in a setting of total acceptance, the child could begin to experience himself as a positive and valid person. Basically the child would be able to rebuild his or her psyche. One reason for the therapeutic interest in psychedelic drugs was the belief of some experimental subjects that the experience reduced their feelings of guilt, made them less depressed and anxious, and more self-accepting, tolerant, or sensually alert. There was also interest in making therapeutic use of the powerful psychedelic experiences of regression, abreaction, intense transference, and symbolic drama to improve or speed up psychotherapy.

 

The use of psychedelics in therapy, particularly with children, seems to raise some ethical questions. Although the lack of a definite analysis is hardly unforeseen when one considers the mystery surrounding both schizophrenic behavior in children and subjective response to psychedelic drugs. Despite great diversity in expectations and technique, there was one point of departure shared by all investigators, namely, that all known forms of treatment had been attempted without success. Thus, the use of a potent experimental drug with the particular chronic patients selected seemed justified.

 

The children that were chosen for theraputic psychedelics were severely disturbed and seen as hopeless cases. With regard to duration of illness, most had been hospitalized for periods ranging from two to four years. The ward in which these children lived was in a state of constant pandemonium. There was constant screeching, fighting and destructive behavior. Many children were destructive towards the environment, to each other, to the staff and to themselves. The noise level was always high, as many of the children were extremely hyperactive and vocal. Other children were very withdrawn, involved in repetitious physical motions and when interfered with would lash out at the intruder. There was little interactive or parallel play and any toys or material brought into the ward were soon destroyed. Feces smearing and random urinating were a constant problem. To say the least the environment was not conducive to good mental health.

 

 

The team consisted of a psychiatrist, who chose not to have an LSD experience but was medically responsible for the research, psychology graduate students and psychiatric nursing technicians. For any one session there was usually three to four staff, relieving each other throughout the day as the sessions were extremely intense and required very active participation by the staff. All staff had had their own experience with LSD and psilocybin, as it is accepted practice that in order to understand what was going on with the children one had to have had personal experiences with the drugs. Besides spending time with the patient during the treatment session itself, a total program had to be developed for each patient and that program communicated to all ward personnel to attempt consistency in the therapeutic approach. The use of a variety of therapeutically meaningful stimuli was used during sessions such as music, flowers, pictures, and food. There was always a positive patient-therapist relationship formed prior to the session itself. Another approach to the therapy was the presence of both a male and female therapist who "had thorough acquaintance with the phenomena of the drug through personal experience", and active therapist involvement with the patient including role-playing (e.g., father, mother). These conditions have repeatedly been found to significantly enhance the personal value of psychedelic experiences. Finally, psychedelic therapy with psychotic children seems most effective in natural, flexible settings that are reasonably free of artificiality, experimental restrictions on spontaneous behavior, and mechanically administered procedures. Conversely, barren medical or laboratory environments seem clearly anti-therapeutic. As the ward personnel began to see the remarkable changes occurring in the children, they became involved and supportive in the ongoing care of each child.

 

The results of these studies came out positive. In these aggressive, overtly psychotic patients, Fisher reports that "There were two major changes observed: First, there was a decrease in personalized anticipation and a corresponding gain in accuracy of response; and second, an inhibition of strongly emotional or 'feeling' reactions to the staff." Other favorable changes reported included decreases in hallucinations, negativism, and regressive defenses with a corresponding increase in reality-contact. Another finding worth noting is that withdrawn children became more emotionally responsive while aggressive children became less so, it is hypothesized that psychedelic drugs "tend to 'normalize' behavior rather than subdue or stimulate it. Some of the children showed an increase in social behaviors manifested by increased eye to face contact and increased responsiveness to adults, an increase in smiling and laughing behavior generally considered an indication of a pleasurable affective state, and a decrease in one form of non-adaptive behavior demonstrated by a reduction of self-stimulation.

 

In conclusion, it is very difficult at this point to predict the future of psychedelic psychotherapy. The fact that it can be used safely and effectively does not automatically mean that it will be assimilated by mainstream psychiatry. This issue is complicated by many factors of an emotional, administrative, political and legal nature. However, we should clearly differentiate between the future of therapeutic psychedelics and its contribution to the theory and practice of psychiatry. If anything, this is a step in the learning process of overcoming some of the obstacles we find with the psychotherapy of schizophrenia.

 

;)

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ayau is hard to get down.but well worth the effort.I DONT THINK IT CONTRIBUTES TOWARD SCHIZOPHRENIA.instead ,it is like a medicine that relives depression in schizoaffectives.in america it is a difficult medicine to find,but,it can be done.its not something that would be considered a recreational drug

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I just wanted to say ayahuasca because it's the only way I could say DMT without it sounding like a "Drug"

Even though that I am well aware that it is.

 

I ask about tropane alkaloids because when I drink wine out of a trumpet people walk in my door and talk to me for hours. I hear voices and the hallucinations are severely vivid. I've only done it once and have no desire to do it again it's way too intense, but it definitely felt schizo to me.

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just a warning friend. :eek_big: :eek_big:

 

Angels Trumpet Plant

The Angels trumpet plant is a beautiful flower, its nice fragrance brings on memory of the Garden of Eden, this amazing plant well known as Brugmansia or Datura opens after dark and remains open until the sunlight hits them the next morning. Angel trumpet releases from its flowers a really sweet perfume but also an intoxicating scent. As a warning the Angels trumpet plant is extremely toxic. The plant prefers damp conditions with warm days and cool nights.

 

This exotic and tropical looking plant has that amazing scent that shakes our senses; has five species included the Datura genus. All parts of the angel trumpet are narcotic and poisonous. Some people have ingested or smoked it for its narcotic effects, and some of those people are not alive. This peculiar plant can be scorted by other garden plants to create a pleasing effect on your garden; it depends on where you live and of the weather. Some of the plants you may combine with this cute plant are: Hostas, Dianthus, Nepeta, Artemisia, Verbena. And if you like, why not mix and match any combination of these to find the effect that is pleasing to all of your senses.

 

 

 

http://www.ecoterralandscape.com/images/angels-trumpetNL.jpg

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Does anyone know if any Tropane alkaloids are present in the human body?

 

Ooh. I almost forgot the question. :eek_big:

No. well I can't find any references in the Med. books I have. (but there getting old) :eek_big:

 

eMedicine - Plant Poisoning, Alkaloids - Tropane : Article by Richard A Wagner, MD, PhD

 

Background: Alkaloids are plant metabolites that have a nitrogen-containing chemical ring structure, alkali-like chemical reactivity, and pharmacologic activity. The alkaloids represent a very diverse group of medically significant compounds that include well-known drugs like the opiates.

 

A subgroup of the alkaloids is the alkaloid amines. The 3 major pharmacologic groups of alkaloid amines are the hallucinogenic alkaloid amines, the stimulant alkaloid amines, and the highly anticholinergic tropane alkaloids (also called the belladonna alkaloids or bicyclic alkaloids).

 

Plants that contain the tropane alkaloids atropine, scopolamine, and hyoscyamine include the following:

 

Datura species (jimson weed, angel's trumpet, thorn apple)

 

Hyoscyamus niger (henbane)

 

Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade)

 

Mandragora officinarum (mandrake)

All of these plants have long histories of hallucinogenic use and have been connected with sorcery, witchcraft, native medicine, and magico-religious rites dating back to 1500 BC and Homer's Odyssey. (Homer's use of the plant moly as an antidote to Circe's poisonous anticholinergic drugs may have been the first recorded use of an anticholinesterase to reverse central anticholinergic intoxication.)

 

Chinese herbal medicines containing tropane alkaloids have been used to treat asthma, chronic bronchitis, pain, and flu symptoms. In Mexico, Datura is taken by Yaqui women to lessen pain of childbirth. In Africa, a common use is to smoke leaves from Datura to relieve asthma and pulmonary problems. Many cultures worldwide add plants with tropane alkaloids (particularly Datura species) to alcoholic beverages to increase intoxication.

 

Pathophysiology: Toxicity from plants containing tropane alkaloids manifests as classic anticholinergic poisoning. Symptoms usually occur 30-60 minutes after ingestion and may continue for 24-48 hours because tropane alkaloids delay gastric emptying and absorption.

 

Physical: The mnemonic “red as a beet, dry as a bone, blind as a bat, mad as a hatter, and hot as a hare” is useful to remember the anticholinergic toxidrome.

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Thanks for the info.

I know how dangerous brugmansia is, like I said.

Did it once. never again. no one should mess with her.

Tropane alkaloids induce schizophrenia,

and I think it would be a good idea for doctors to drink her nectar if anyone ever wants to understand what it's like to be schizo.

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Thanks for the info.

I know how dangerous brugmansia is, like I said.

Did it once. never again. no one should mess with her.

Tropane alkaloids induce schizophrenia,

and I think it would be a good idea for doctors to drink her nectar if anyone ever wants to understand what it's like to be schizo.

 

why would they want to do that.as an aside.never.never.never. try datura.its poison

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