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Iron Deficiency


Monomer
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I had minor anemia at one time, which contributed to a lot of fatigue. (It was work related. Not eating well at that time.) I increased the amount of aerobic exercise (running) that I did and ate more red meat and vegetables. It went away after a few months.

 

Aerobic exercise promotes the formation of blood cells to carry extra oxygen, and the increase in blood flow will boost oxygen and nutrients to your brain and the rest of your body. It won't cure the anemia, but could help you recover faster, by encouraging your body to put the extra iron into the red blood cells. It might be best to consult your doctor if you want to consider this.

 

I don't exercise as much as I use to because I was having problems with my knees (netball injury). But I know I need to increase the amount of exercise I do, and I feel great after a good work-out, a little worn out, but also more energetic.

 

 

This site has good advice, IMO:

 

How Is Anemia Treated?

 

Interesting information, thanks for the link, maikeru :(

 

 

Do you drink tea, coffee, or cocoa? If you drink any of them, the polyphenolic antioxidants in them, the tannic acids and catechins, chelate metal ions and can hinder iron absorption and lead to anemia if your diet is not rich in iron to make up for the loss. If so, cut back on tea, coffee, or cocoa until your iron levels are back to normal.

 

Yeah, I was reading about that yesterday. I drink loads of green tea for its nutritional benefits, but I'll cut back for a while.

 

 

If you also are not averse to eating seaweed, such as in sushi, miso soup, or seaweed salad, you could try to include some every day. Many types of seaweed are rich in iron as well as other minerals and vitamins.

 

I'm just beginning to appreciate sushi, so I won't mind increasing my consumption of it.

 

 

Here are some iron-rich recipes I've found:

Welcome to Homemakers.com : Iron-rich recipes

Welcome to TarlaDalal.com

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I don't exercise as much as I use to because I was having problems with my knees (netball injury). But I know I need to increase the amount of exercise I do, and I feel great after a good work-out, a little worn out, but also more energetic.

 

I'm sorry to hear about your knees. In that case, definitely go easy and be gentle with yourself if exercising. Exercise shouldn't hurt or injure, IMO.

 

Drinking tea, coffee, or cocoa before or after can help speed up recovery from a workout. I prefer before (especially with green tea, because it also helps to warm my body and muscles) to cut down on soreness.

 

Interesting information, thanks for the link, maikeru ;)

 

I'm glad it was of use. :)

 

Yeah, I was reading about that yesterday. I drink loads of green tea for its nutritional benefits, but I'll cut back for a while.

 

So do I. I really like green tea and coffee, but they have taken with some care, like every other food. When I had anemia, I cut back for about a month then resumed drinking it. I probably drink 3-5 cups a day now, but I try to make sure that I eat iron-rich foods fairly often and do not drink the tea with food. I've had no problems with anemia since then. And once you're back to normal, you can enjoy the health benefits of tea, all of its antioxidant and anti-disease wonders. ;)

 

I'm just beginning to appreciate sushi, so I won't mind increasing my consumption of it.

 

Try some inarizushi and makizushi, which don't have raw fish, and I'm sure you'll be hooked. And you can eat seaweed soup or salad.

 

Image:KansaiSushi.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Makizushi on the left, inarizushi on the right (in the little fried tofu skins).

 

You can modify them by adding brown rice to the white rice or replacing the white rice entirely with brown rice for added nutrients and iron. White rice, unfortunately, has very little nutrient value beyond its starch. I don't eat white rice anymore, just brown and black sweet rice. I made the change after having the anemia a few years ago. IIRC, whole wheat is a good source of iron as well.

 

 

Bookmarked. Lovely. :)

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Try some inarizushi and makizushi, which don't have raw fish, and I'm sure you'll be hooked. And you can eat seaweed soup or salad.

 

Image:KansaiSushi.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Makizushi on the left, inarizushi on the right (in the little fried tofu skins).

 

I'll look out for them, especially since raw fish doesn't really appeal to me. Sushi seems very popluar because there are so many sushi eateries in Adelaide now.

 

You can modify them by adding brown rice to the white rice or replacing the white rice entirely with brown rice for added nutrients and iron. White rice, unfortunately, has very little nutrient value beyond its starch. I don't eat white rice anymore, just brown and black sweet rice. I made the change after having the anemia a few years ago. IIRC, whole wheat is a good source of iron as well.

 

I've never heard of black rice. So I did some searching and discovered that black rice is rather high in iron. It has 3.5mg/100g of iron, compared with brown which has 2.2mg/100g, and white which has 1.2mg/100g.

 

PDF: http://www.fao.org/rice2004/en/f-sheet/factsheet3.pdf

 

 

Here are a couple of tables I found listing the iron content in foods:

 

Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron

Vegetarianism

 

Interestingly a tablespoon of blackstrap molasses has about the same amount of iron as half a cup of boiled spinach.

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I'll look out for them, especially since raw fish doesn't really appeal to me. Sushi seems very popluar because there are so many sushi eateries in Adelaide now.

 

Understandable. Raw fish doesn't appeal to many people. If you're adventurous, you can try to make some sushi yourself. Thankfully, it doesn't require a Ph.D. in astrophysics or quantum mechanics to do sushi. Just a local Asian grocery shop. I used to watch my parents make sushi at our shop and former restaurant.

 

I've never heard of black rice. So I did some searching and discovered that black rice is rather high in iron. It has 3.5mg/100g of iron, compared with brown which has 2.2mg/100g, and white which has 1.2mg/100g.

 

PDF: http://www.fao.org/rice2004/en/f-sheet/factsheet3.pdf

 

Neat. I didn't know that. I was aware that black rice was rich in anthocyanins, which accounts for the purple to black colour (much like in "Indian corn" which has black, red, or purple kernels), so it is a good source of antioxidants as well. Because my folks own their own shop, we can import it in for sale and our own use. Most people probably wouldn't know about it. I think ours comes from Thailand, but a Japanese friend told me they have it in Japan as well. It's just not very common. I've grown to like it over white rice. It's more chewy and has a slightly sweet taste to it, hence the name of black sweet rice. And it turns the brown rice mixed in a lovely deep purple colour after the pot is cooked.

 

For others, here's black rice:

 

Black rice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Here are a couple of tables I found listing the iron content in foods:

 

Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron

Vegetarianism

 

Interestingly a tablespoon of blackstrap molasses has about the same amount of iron as half a cup of boiled spinach.

 

Both are good links, and the first one especially has loads and loads of information. Maybe it's time to get more molasses in your diet. ;)

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Great posts! :)

 

I do have to warn on the spinach consumption though. Spinach does not contain a lot of "bioavailable" iron and the calcium is mostly not realized either because of the oxalates present. This is especially important for women!

Spinach - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

A quick question for those with iron deficiency, Are your fingernails white?

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Understandable. Raw fish doesn't appeal to many people. If you're adventurous, you can try to make some sushi yourself.

 

I started to like sushi when I tried some a friend had made. She served it with soy sauce, and previously I'd eaten it without the soy sauce and didn't enjoy it too much. Anyway, I should try to make some myself.

 

Maybe it's time to get more molasses in your diet. :)

 

Gladly! It's in liquorice, something I particularly enjoy eating.

 

 

Great posts! :D

 

I do have to warn on the spinach consumption though. Spinach does not contain a lot of "bioavailable" iron and the calcium is mostly not realized either because of the oxalates present. This is especially important for women!

Spinach - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Maybe I'll go easy on the spinach then. There are tastier sources of iron (molasses...mmm...) :hi:

 

A quick question for those with iron deficiency, Are your fingernails white?

 

Do you mean the tip or the lunula or white spots? I don't have any white spots on my nails.

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Great posts! :)

 

I do have to warn on the spinach consumption though. Spinach does not contain a lot of "bioavailable" iron and the calcium is mostly not realized either because of the oxalates present. This is especially important for women!

Spinach - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

I love spinach, but I've really cut back since the E. coli scares for certain vegetables. (Seems like a new one every week.) No more bagged spinach salad. I'm planning to grow my own in my terra preta in a few weeks/when convenient.

 

A quick question for those with iron deficiency, Are your fingernails white?

 

I remember when I got it a few years ago, under my fingernails were a bit lighter white. Normally they're pink as now. But it was more evident in my face and cheeks, which became increasingly pale, and the perpetual tiredness that even extra sleep couldn't seem to make up for.

 

Monomer, I have a feeling that you and sushi will get along quite nicely. Soy sauce is a must, and you can try low-sodium varieties if regular soy sauce is too strong. Watch out for wasabi. It goes up the nose!

 

Mmm, licorice. You have good taste. Now, I've developed a want for some...

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Black rice

I look will out for it; sounds nice.

I sometimes get a "wild rice" mix that has black grains in it. Someone told me these were seeds of a Canadian grass.??

 

Once you get a taste for "raw fish" you will find it hard to go back to the cooked variety. Tuna is usually dipped in soy and eaten with a little finely cut ginger and wasabi. Fantastic!

The fish HAS to be extremely fresh.

If we wanted traditional "fish and chips" we would always ask our fish-shop if he had any fish suitable for Sasshimi. If he said no, we knew he hadn't been to the markets for a while and had a hamburger instead.

Seafood and fish coast a fortune here as all the best stuff is flown First Class to Japan.

If you eat you meat rare you will have no problems eating Japanese prepared "raw fish" (It is not as if you eat it like a Canadian Bear).

 

My daughter stayed with a family in Japan who ate and amazing array of creatures; often raw. When she ate some beautiful, finely cut, marbled Japanese beef raw her Japanese hosts were shocked and amazed! "eey stoong stomach"

 

When they came to visit us we spent days, hours preparing Japanese food (It is so time consuming and delicate -an art form.) They were very appreciative and polite about our attempts.

Finally one day we just ran out of time and cooked the traditional Ozzie "Baked Dinner". In this case a large chook,with baked veggies & greens. We placed the chook on the table with the vegies around it on a big plater.

The reaction was startling. The Japanese visitors were gob smacked. They loved the meal! Took pictures of it and would talk of nothing else! They had never seen a whole chook cooked in one piece before!!

 

What a fascinating thread this has turned into.

Just from people trying to be helpful.:)

 

I did a little research on pregnancy and iron.

It is not at all clear cut. Too many factors seem to enter into the equations.

Although my wife who was low in iron did have premy. babies. Something I would heartily recommend everyone avoid . It is very stressful to all concerned.

One study said Mum's who took iron ended up with kids who were a bit more unmanageable. But that was just one study

HERE:

Health & Medical News - Study questions iron in pregnancy - 18/10/2005

 

One interesting site I looked at talked about the many problems of having too much iron especially with kids. So keep those iron tabs locked up!

EG

There is considerable potential for iron toxicity because very little iron is excreted from the body.

Thus, iron can accumulate in body tissues and organs when normal storage sites are full. For example, people with hemachromatosis are at risk of developing iron toxicity because of their high iron stores.

 

In children, death has occurred from ingesting 200 mg of iron [7]. It is important to keep iron supplements tightly capped and away from children's reach.

Any time excessive iron intake is suspected, immediately call your physician or Poison Control Center, or visit your local emergency room.

Doses of iron prescribed for iron deficiency anemia in adults are associated with constipation, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, especially when the supplements are taken on an empty stomach [1].

Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron

Same article; genetics also plays a big part

Iron overload is associated with several genetic diseases including hemochromatosis, which affects approximately 1 in 250 individuals of northern European descent [67]. Individuals with hemochromatosis absorb iron very efficiently, which can result in a build up of excess iron and can cause organ damage such as cirrhosis of the liver and heart failure [1,3,67-69]. Hemochromatosis is often not diagnosed until excess iron stores have damaged an organ. Iron supplementation may accelerate the effects of hemochromatosis, an important reason why adult men and postmenopausal women who are not iron deficient should avoid iron supplements.

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Black rice

I look will out for it; sounds nice.

I sometimes get a "wild rice" mix that has black grains in it. Someone told me these were seeds of a Canadian grass.??

 

It is. And people will wonder what in the heck you're eating. :) Wild rice is related to true rice species, but not really rice, although they're pretty much marsh grasses. It's also called Indian rice or Canada rice here.

 

Wild rice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

I've had it before too in a "wild rice" mix. Tasty.

 

Once you get a taste for "raw fish" you will find it hard to go back to the cooked variety. Tuna is usually dipped in soy and eaten with a little finely cut ginger and wasabi. Fantastic!

The fish HAS to be extremely fresh.

 

Ah, a true connoisseur of sashimi! ;) Here, when I talk about sushi, I know the first thing that pops into people's minds is "raw fish" and that triggers the gag reflex. The fish does have to be very fresh or prepared properly. I rarely eat sashimi, though. The local restaurants aren't famous for good food and make me worry. I can't believe locals consider abominations like Teriyaki Stix and Panda Express to be good Asian food, when they undercook, overcook, or char the food regularly. (Maybe I should sell the terra preta idea to them?)

 

Panda Express - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

My daughter stayed with a family in Japan who ate and amazing array of creatures; often raw. When she ate some beautiful, finely cut, marbled Japanese beef raw her Japanese hosts were shocked and amazed! "eey stoong stomach"

 

It takes a while to get used to the idea of eating meat raw. I got used to eating sashimi when I was young, and we would go out to good Japanese restaurants in California when visiting relatives. And my mother makes good sashimi at home, although she takes some extra precautions, like adding a little wine to them then rinsing. I have a theory that a little wine makes everything better...

 

When they came to visit us we spent days, hours preparing Japanese food (It is so time consuming and delicate -an art form.) They were very appreciative and polite about our attempts.

Finally one day we just ran out of time and cooked the traditional Ozzie "Baked Dinner". In this case a large chook,with baked veggies & greens. We placed the chook on the table with the vegies around it on a big plater.

The reaction was startling. The Japanese visitors were gob smacked. They loved the meal! Took pictures of it and would talk of nothing else! They had never seen a whole chook cooked in one piece before!!

 

That is worth a thread in of itself. Forgive my lack of Ozzie terms, but what is a chook? I ran it through Wiki, and it says it's a chicken, but I want to be sure. O, English language, changest thou wherever thy people go?

 

What a fascinating thread this has turned into.

Just from people trying to be helpful.:)

 

I did a little research on pregnancy and iron.

It is not at all clear cut. Too many factors seem to enter into the equations.

Although my wife who was low in iron did have premy. babies. Something I would heartily recommend everyone avoid . It is very stressful to all concerned.

One study said Mum's who took iron ended up with kids who were a bit more unmanageable. But that was just one study

HERE:

Health & Medical News - Study questions iron in pregnancy - 18/10/2005

 

I wonder why extra iron would create more unruly kids. Oxidative (free radical) stress on the developing baby from the extra iron? Maybe it causes some developmental changes?

 

One thing I wanted to mention is that free iron in solution can cause increased free-radical damage to cells, such as in the stomach and intestines, possibly causing higher rates of GI cancers. Maybe this accounts for some of the irritation and discomfort caused by iron pills/tablets?

 

I think the best way to get iron is gradually through food sources. Pills or tablets would be good if you need a massive iron boost, but in the case of mild anemia, probably not.

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Watch out for wasabi. It goes up the nose!

 

Nothing clears the sinus like wasabi!!

 

 

I wonder why extra iron would create more unruly kids. Oxidative (free radical) stress on the developing baby from the extra iron? Maybe it causes some developmental changes?

 

Excess iron plus oxygen produces free radicals which are lethal molecules that damage cells and DNA. This can ultimatley lead to brain damage or other neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and multiple sclerosis.

 

Iron Deficiency and Anemia

 

 

 

I think the best way to get iron is gradually through food sources. Pills or tablets would be good if you need a massive iron boost, but in the case of mild anemia, probably not.

 

I agree. I'm formulating an eating plan to ensure I get enough iron every day. While looking for iron levels in food I came across this site which looks like it will be quite helpful:

 

Food Data Chart - Iron

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Nothing clears the sinus like wasabi!!

 

Give it to unsuspecting people to help introduce them to the pleasures of sushi. :shrug:

 

 

Good link. I remember that in the lab I worked at before, we used to use copper sulfate solution in a pan in the incubators which would kill just about anything that fell into it. Kind of like forever-bleach in that regard.

 

I agree. I'm formulating an eating plan to ensure I get enough iron every day. While looking for iron levels in food I came across this site which looks like it will be quite helpful:

 

Food Data Chart - Iron

 

Another very good link. I saw Milo and Ovaltine high on the lists there. I drink those often in the morning to start my day. With a little orange juice, maybe another way to help restore your iron stores? :turtle:

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  • 1 year later...

1. In ayurveda, you have lauh bhasm (powder), lauha sav (syrup)

 

 

2. In Homeopathy, you have medicines like Ferrum Mettalica, Ferrum Phos, pulsatilla,etc

 

 

3. In Allopathy you have iron preparations (ferrous, ferric),and vitamin/mineral supplements.

 

 

4. At home, in kitchen, you have jaggery, caarot juice, beetroot, til oil, use iron utensil to cook food, eat protein rich diet, etc.

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2. In Homeopathy, you have medicines like Ferrum Mettalica, Ferrum Phos, pulsatilla,etc

I don't think it's a fair comment to refer to anything in homeopathy as "medicine." While some plants may have health benefits, diluting them to one atom of active compound in a water solution the size of our galaxy does not offer said benefit, as has been repeatedly demonstrated by studies showing the quackery of homeopathy.

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