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#1 cwes99_03

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 02:54 PM

I have for quite some time been interested in the architecture of different parts of the world.
I am now nearing the age where I might buy my first house, or possibly build one.

That being said, can anyone recommend to me some free online resources where I can learn about ancient chinese architecture, korean ondol architecture, or other asian architecture.

Particularly, as far as the Chinese interest goes, I remember seeing a show a few years about the spoke about the first "code" book known to contain building designs and codes for building. I believe it was from the Qing dynasty (sp?).

EDIT:
It may have been the Song dynasty.

#2 InfiniteNow

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 03:52 PM

Perhaps the following book:

Amazon.com: Ancient Chinese Architecture Series, Palace Architecture: Books: Jinghua Ru,Hualiang Peng,E. Zang,S. Cui,Y. Ling,H. Liu http://www.amazon.co...e/dp/3211829903

#3 cwes99_03

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 04:00 PM

Yah, just saw that myself. Thing is I'm not looking for a coffee table book. I'm not looking necessarily for a text book.

I did just find this though. Does anyone here know about the Yinzao fashi.

#4 Turtle

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 06:55 PM

Yah, just saw that myself. Thing is I'm not looking for a coffee table book. I'm not looking necessarily for a text book.

I did just find this though. Does anyone here know about the Yinzao fashi.


My carpentry specialty was finish work and my masterpiece a house built according to the methods of Japanese temples. The Chinese equivalent of my work (from your term 'Yinzao fashi') seems to be 'xiao muzuo', or 'small'. In strict adherence to the Japanese tradition, my master used no brackets to build the log frame, ('da muzuo', or 'large') ; all was joined by hidden mortice and tenon.
Here's my source for those terms:
http://architronic.s...2/v5n2.04a.html

Whatever design you employ, master your tools. :hyper:

PS One of the peculiarities of the Japanese tradition dealt with how to treat the joints in wood flooring; rather than the Western method of flush tight joints between boards, the edges get relieved. This adds a distinctive look to the flooring, feels nice on the feet, and helps cover the expansion and contraction that is bound to occur in a wood floor.
That is all.:)

#5 cwes99_03

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 12:47 PM

That last part, Turtle is that part that I think I'm looking for.

I'm particularly interested in their finishing techniques and whatnot. I'm also interested in their hand tools. I know they use different types of saws that I thought were pretty neat. Could you recommend a web source, or if need be a book which might detail these things?

#6 Turtle

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 05:00 PM

That last part, Turtle is that part that I think I'm looking for.

I'm particularly interested in their finishing techniques and whatnot. I'm also interested in their hand tools. I know they use different types of saws that I thought were pretty neat. Could you recommend a web source, or if need be a book which might detail these things?


I aim to please. :naughty: The Japanese saws have several unique qualities as opposed to "Western" styles. The first is that they cut on the pull, and this requires some getting used to by the operator. As with all saws, finesse is King.
Next, the Japanese saws have knife-like teeth sharpened on both edges, although I see this more ond more on commercial Western saws in the shops.
Then we have the "stick" handle as opposed to the "hand-grip" style of Western saws. Again it takes some time to grow accustom to it, but having the handle offset allows you to use the saw where you can't a Western style as it raises your hand above the material.
Lastly, some Japanese style saws have a curved sweep to the cutting edge which allows you to cut a slot interior to a stick.
I have found no links yet but try your phone book for local suppliers. :lol:
Edit: Wicky Link: http://en.wikipedia....ki/Japanese_saw
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#7 moo

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 10:41 AM

Ah, the love of carpentry is a many-splintered thing...

Great info, it's fascinating how such simple tools can develop so differently.
:doh:

moo