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My Idea Of How Apes Turned Into Humans

Apes into human Human evolution

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#1 Mpossum

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Posted 26 July 2020 - 08:20 PM

My idea in this area came about probaby half a decade ago already, and I basically stayed quiet on it, since I definitely needed resources to verify it. But, in a gist, my idea of how apes turned into humans uses some specific variables. One of those variables is strength. The other is culture. Another is intelligence.

When we were in the trees, and when we came down, I believe we differentiated ourselves based on our strength. Going down into the wild with things that can eat us required good strength, also intelligence. Otherwise, how would we survive? Evolutionary speaking, possibly random mutations first occurred with intelligence and/or strength, which made us more able to deal with that which was scary and below. Over time, this strength and conditioning with good intelligence, selection, and a development of culture surrounding this phenomena, over time emerged the humans.

Sometimes I go so far as to say that these prehumans were probably even doing a kind of pushup, acrobatics with their surroundings, and maybe even were good wrestlers, or tricky fighters.

This is my explanation as a person without an explanation. I have heard of punctuated equilibrium. I have even studied physical anthropology, and there is not much out there in traditional academia. Thus, this is what I think happened. What do you think?

Edited by Mpossum, 26 July 2020 - 08:21 PM.


#2 Thoth101

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Posted 26 July 2020 - 09:20 PM

I don't think apes turned into humans. More possible apes evolved into Neanderthals and Neanderthals in to humans. There may have also been genetic tampering from an extraterrestrial presence that came here. There are many variables and many things that could of happened. We could have also come from Mars also.



#3 Mpossum

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 01:50 AM

Yeah, sure, but I have been through all of those ideas. I cannot conceive of an extraterrestrial presence when I think how life evolves so naturally. It might be true, but I am definitely speculative of that. Plus, if Mars harbored life, then it would be a no brainer that we would get there and find something really epic there. 

 

Anyway, yeah, definitely I see it was a transitionary situation, but I am just speaking in general terms, with basic premises. I like the idea when I am thinking about this that there is little fossil records of this whole situation, and I am seeing it through a peephole of potential. 



#4 Thoth101

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 02:24 AM

Yeah, sure, but I have been through all of those ideas. I cannot conceive of an extraterrestrial presence when I think how life evolves so naturally. It might be true, but I am definitely speculative of that. Plus, if Mars harbored life, then it would be a no brainer that we would get there and find something really epic there. 

 

Anyway, yeah, definitely I see it was a transitionary situation, but I am just speaking in general terms, with basic premises. I like the idea when I am thinking about this that there is little fossil records of this whole situation, and I am seeing it through a peephole of potential. 

I guess you have not heard the latest news then. :lol:

 

https://www.fox10pho...l-some-findings


Edited by Thoth101, 27 July 2020 - 02:25 AM.


#5 Mutex

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 05:40 AM

Apes are more our cousins rather than out grandparents, but we are the same species. 

 

I think the biggest thing that gave early humans that advantage was that we worked out it is far easier to change our minds rather than change our bodies. 

 

It's all about our ability to quickly adapt to different and changing environments, things change fast, but it is easier to adapt if you have a good brain that can find ways of surviving and  quickly adapting to different conditions.

 

We can live in the hottest deserts and the coldest ice, or the thickest forests..  But to get that big brain and the adaptability it gives us we had to give up all sorts of other things, like physical strength, our eyesight, our smell and hearing. 

 

All we need is the energy to power our big brains and we rely on that brain to get us our food and shelter and survival.

 

But it is simply easier to change our mind, than change our body, and that quickness of changing our mind gives us that edge.



#6 Mpossum

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 06:07 AM

I see how you are situated toward intelligence, and powering that intelligence. You say we had to give up strength. Scientifically speaking, maybe that is true, but what is going on here? Are you suggesting that swinging from trees indicate strength? If so, that might be true, but I would first think that fighting animals on the ground, like wild Pig and Tiger like creatures, indicate strength. I just wanted to make a point about the strength in particular, since I feel that fitness was THE reason for our evolution, specifically. I mean, I guess they don't have to be incredibly buff, but I am just referring to plain old fitness, but very amplified, and straitforward. It was literally like running, jumping, and wrestling that helped us evolve I am saying. When I picture the first pre humans coming down from the trees, all hairy and stuff, and these creatures having changed into something closer to a human, I picture an adaption to their athletic abilities. Things that make them flexible, able to lift objects intelligently, manipulate variables of weight and pressure, etc. 


Edited by Mpossum, 27 July 2020 - 06:08 AM.


#7 A-wal

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 08:53 AM

When we were in the trees, and when we came down, I believe we differentiated ourselves based on our strength. Going down into the wild with things that can eat us required good strength, also intelligence. Otherwise, how would we survive? Evolutionary speaking, possibly random mutations first occurred with intelligence and/or strength, which made us more able to deal with that which was scary and below. Over time, this strength and conditioning with good intelligence, selection, and a development of culture surrounding this phenomena, over time emerged the humans.

Yea, what's your point? That just how evolution works, random mutation with natural selection leading to the survival of the fittest mutations (in general).

 

I don't think apes turned into humans. More possible apes evolved into Neanderthals and Neanderthals in to humans.

Nope, neanderthals were a separate species that lived alongside early humans. They're not here any more because we were better.

 

Apes are more our cousins rather than out grandparents

Exactly.



#8 Flummoxed

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 09:29 AM

 

 

Nope, neanderthals were a separate species that lived alongside early humans. They're not here any more because we were better.

 

 

Not only lived alongside but interbred, they also had bigger brain cavities, but a very small gene pool. (Possibly caused by inbreeding)

 

Clear evidence exists that your average asian, white, human being is between 2 to 4 % neanderthal, some clearly are a lot more neanderthal than others. Some even have Denovian DNA https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Denisovan. In Australia and Papua New Guinea there is evidence that their was another human ancestor as well https://www.abc.net....uggests/7968950



#9 Mpossum

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 09:46 AM

My point is in there. I am suggesting that potentially, there very well could be some logic behind an idea that says fitness, but human fitness is obviously a no brainer. Human fitness, we picture aerobics, and running, etc. I believe there might be a point to considering that a particular fitness helped turn us from monkeys into intelligent creatures. I am not trying to beat around any bush here. Plain and simple.



#10 A-wal

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 10:45 AM

Not only lived alongside but interbred, they also had bigger brain cavities, but a very small gene pool. (Possibly caused by inbreeding)

Yea there's even evidence of mixed tribes. i don't mean tribes of hybrids, I mean tribes with both.

 

Clear evidence exists that your average asian, white, human being is between 2 to 4 % neanderthal, some clearly are a lot more neanderthal than others. Some even have Denovian DNA https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Denisovan. In Australia and Papua New Guinea there is evidence that their was another human ancestor as well https://www.abc.net....uggests/7968950

Is the DNA active though or just along for the ride?



#11 gravitymall

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 01:40 PM

I think social cooperation is key. High intelligence seems like a sure fire thing for evolution to select for, yet we're the only ones. Our babies are some of the most fragile when they're born, yet they're able to develop because of humans socially cooperating on a larger scale than any other animal.


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#12 Thoth101

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 09:21 PM

Yea, what's your point? That just how evolution works, random mutation with natural selection leading to the survival of the fittest mutations (in general).

 

Nope, neanderthals were a separate species that lived alongside early humans. They're not here any more because we were better.

 

Exactly.

So in your theory did the Neanderthals come from Apes also? Also why is the human species more intelligent then the Neanderthals or is that big misconception? Remember though these are all just theories none of us really know for sure.



#13 Thoth101

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 09:23 PM

Not only lived alongside but interbred, they also had bigger brain cavities, but a very small gene pool. (Possibly caused by inbreeding)

 

Clear evidence exists that your average asian, white, human being is between 2 to 4 % neanderthal, some clearly are a lot more neanderthal than others. Some even have Denovian DNA https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Denisovan. In Australia and Papua New Guinea there is evidence that their was another human ancestor as well https://www.abc.net....uggests/7968950

 As we are able to mess around with the DNA of other species and even our own is it not conceivable that a more advanced or extraterrestrial species messed with our DNA? Or that we came from the stars ourselves? Although I wouldn't be surprised if Humans and Neanderthals were mating also. But the question is how would it be possible that they have a child together naturally? A human can't have a child with an ape naturally.

 

Clearly the creation myths of each ancient civilization discuss alien gods who descended from the sky for any number of reasons, some of who allegedly mated with human woman to create bloodlines, or created humans through biogenetic experiments.

 

Also The Mayan - Popol Vuh, states:

 

"Men came from the stars, knowing everything, and they examined
the four corners of the sky and the Earth's round surface."

 

The Mayan Chilam Balaam texts stated,
 "Beings descended from the sky in flying vessels...
 white men in flying rings, who can touch the sky."

 

The truth is none of us know for sure what actually happened in the past and all we have is our theories. Nothing is absolute.

 

Did we evolve from Apes? I have a hard time believing that. I think it would make more sense that Apes came from us the other way around. Or that their was a lot of genetic experimentation going on in the past to create these human like animals.
 


Edited by Thoth101, 27 July 2020 - 09:39 PM.


#14 Mutex

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 12:38 AM

So in your theory did the Neanderthals come from Apes also? Also why is the human species more intelligent then the Neanderthals or is that big misconception? Remember though these are all just theories none of us really know for sure.

 

we do know for sure, no Neanderthals did not come from apes, and neither did humans, Humans, Neanderthals and apes all come from a COMMON ancestor. So we have that clear now right?

 

Neanderthals have on average larger brain cavities than that of humans, that implies they had at least equal if not higher intelligence. 

It was probably not intelligence (or lack of it) that led to Neanderthals dying out and humans surviving (for at least a bit longer). 

 

Neanderthals, as a species lasted far longer than humans have, before they went extinct. 

 

No, aliens did not create or have anything to do with any of this.. 



#15 Thoth101

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 01:06 AM

we do know for sure, no Neanderthals did not come from apes, and neither did humans, Humans, Neanderthals and apes all come from a COMMON ancestor. So we have that clear now right?

 

Neanderthals have on average larger brain cavities than that of humans, that implies they had at least equal if not higher intelligence. 

It was probably not intelligence (or lack of it) that led to Neanderthals dying out and humans surviving (for at least a bit longer). 

 

Neanderthals, as a species lasted far longer than humans have, before they went extinct. 

 

No, aliens did not create or have anything to do with any of this.. 

Well we can atleast agree that Neanderthals or humans didn't come from apes.

 

You do not know for sure who or what created what. So you can't positively say aliens have nothing to do with this. You would have to prove aliens didn't have anything to do with what went on in this Earth in the past. And I would have to prove they did. Which is why we have theories but we can't factually say either way. You do have to wonder though why all these ancient writings about it though and those that came from the sky.

 

But from my research I would say extraterrestrials had a lot to do with humans even if we were originally the extraterrestrials. Either way I think it is interesting to say the least.



#16 OceanBreeze

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 01:40 AM

Well we can atleast agree that Neanderthals or humans didn't come from apes.

 

 

 

You might agree with that, but you are wrong!

 

Not only did humans evolve from apes, but humans are still apes!

 

The Hominidae (/hɒˈmɪnɪdiː/), whose members are known as great apes[note 1] or hominids (/ˈhɒmɪnɪdz/), are a taxonomic family of primates that includes eight extant species in four genera: Pongo, the Bornean, Sumatran and Tapanuli orangutan; Gorilla, the eastern and western gorilla; Pan, the common chimpanzee and the bonobo; and Homo, of which only modern humans remain.

 

The current, 21st-century meaning of "hominid" includes all the great apes including humans. A hominid is a member of the family Hominidae, the great apes: orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees and humans.

 

This cladogram shows where we split off from the pan line (chimpanzees)

 

Figure_29_07_03.jpg

One candidate for LCA is Sahelanthropus tchadensis, which lived close to the time of the chimpanzee–human divergence, (7 Mya). It may have been ancestral to both humans and chimpanzees (which would place it in the tribe Hominini), or alternatively an early member of the tribe Gorillini.



#17 Mutex

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 02:07 AM

 

 

Not only did humans evolve from apes, but humans are still apes!

 

IF we are apes (we are, you are right), then obviously we did not evolve from apes.. as your diagram clearly shows..

 

as I said, humans and the great apes (including humans) have common ancestors, that does not mean humans evolved from modern apes. 


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