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Fusion Powered Hypersonic Rockets


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#1 VictorMedvil

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Posted 04 January 2020 - 07:12 AM

There has been a great deal of talk about hypersonic rockets lately in the news with Russia making a rocket that could travel 27 times the speed of sound, what if I were to tell you that is still very slow compared to other technologies that could be used to accelerate the rockets. What I propose is we take the learning that has happened in space flight with the creation of fusion powered rockets and apply this to today's Hypersonic rockets, it has been said that Fusion powered rockets can take humans from Earth to Mars in 30 days at a very fast speed of 67,000 mph. The Question I have is why isn't this technology being applied to Hypersonic Rockets down on Earth at those speeds you could make a trip around the world in 22 minutes. If the NASA designs for Fusion powered spacecraft are applied to weapons development by the Air Force then you could see speed of up to 87 times the speed of sound far passing current technology. The Future of spacecraft propulsion is Directed Fusion Drive (https://en.wikipedia...ct_Fusion_Drive) and Ion Thrusters (https://en.wikipedia...ki/Ion_thruster) shouldn't advanced weaponry reflect that we are in the space age.

 

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Edited by VictorMedvil, 04 January 2020 - 07:38 AM.


#2 Flummoxed

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Posted 05 January 2020 - 03:47 AM

see speed of up to 87 times the speed of sound far passing current technology.

 

I wonder if the atmospheric drag would limit the speed or if the atmospheric friction would cause your weapon to melt before it exploded? https://en.wikipedia...t-to-drag_ratio



#3 VictorMedvil

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Posted 05 January 2020 - 08:54 AM

I wonder if the atmospheric drag would limit the speed or if the atmospheric friction would cause your weapon to melt before it exploded? https://en.wikipedia...t-to-drag_ratio

That is a possibility depends on the heat shield used(https://en.wikipedia...iki/Heat_shield), personally I wouldn't be against using reinforced carbon-carbon(https://en.wikipedia...d_carbon–carbon) on the weapon.


Edited by VictorMedvil, 05 January 2020 - 08:59 AM.


#4 Mutex

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Posted 05 January 2020 - 08:58 AM

The two problems I see is that there is a clear materials science problem with high speed in our atmoshpere, putting a limit on the maximum speed possible (everything we know of melts). But assuming you are talking about space travel there is still an 'atmosphere' so still friction (clearly far less so could be discounted or dealt with in someway). But the huge problem I see is that we can't get fusion to work, it is still probably that fusion physics in incomplete and does not work as we think it does. 

 

Ion drives do not produce high thrust either so acceleration is slow even though end speeds can be high it takes a long time to get there.



#5 VictorMedvil

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Posted 05 January 2020 - 09:27 AM

The two problems I see is that there is a clear materials science problem with high speed in our atmoshpere, putting a limit on the maximum speed possible (everything we know of melts). But assuming you are talking about space travel there is still an 'atmosphere' so still friction (clearly far less so could be discounted or dealt with in someway). But the huge problem I see is that we can't get fusion to work, it is still probably that fusion physics in incomplete and does not work as we think it does. 

 

Ion drives do not produce high thrust either so acceleration is slow even though end speeds can be high it takes a long time to get there.

Fusion works we use it all the time in Thermonuclear weapons but rigging it inside a rocket and controlling the process is a very different animal, as for the melting problem with the proper materials it will work it just may require some investment of money, but if you want hypersonic weapons with a speed of 87 times the speed of sound this is the only design it would be worth the investment of capital for the US or Europeans.


Edited by VictorMedvil, 05 January 2020 - 09:30 AM.