Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Synthetic Blood Creation


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 VictorMedvil

VictorMedvil

    The Human Shadow

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2480 posts

Posted 09 December 2019 - 07:47 PM

This was something that I thought of after watching a video on rare blood types, this is how to create a infinite amount of red blood cells from genetic engineered hematopoietic stem cells. First we begin with population of the hematopoietic stem cells in a culture, first hematopoietic stem cells from the patient must be extracted from the bone marrow then placed in a oxygenated culture which is being oxygenated by a heart-lung machine as the culture will still require energy as these are living natural cells, which sugar should along with oxygen should be introduced into the culture via blood that keeps the cells alive.

 

Heart-Lung Machine Diagram

drainage-tubes-heart-lung-machine-heart-

 

As the culture now has a way to keep the cells alive now we can begin the genetic modification of them, the gene Zfp90 controls the self-renewal or replication gene of hematopoietic stem cells that gene must be genetically modified in a culture of these cells to have a promoter in front of it to force replication of these cells into more of themselves, first we will need to populate the culture with these cells to turn into red blood cells, this can be done using a Pseudo-typed Retroviral Vector or CRISPR to insert a strong promoter in front of  Zfp90 to produce hematopoietic stem cells at a much quicker rate than naturally which naturally produce quite slowly at around 40 weeks per replication cycle, by genetically engineering these cells can be mass produced by enhancing the replication cycle instead of waiting 40 weeks per cycle of replication naturally.

 

Gene Map Retroviral Vector with augmented Zfp90 insert

New-Bitmap-Image-2.png

 

Once the hematopoietic stem cells are plentiful to desired amount more genetic engineering needs to be done to transform the cells into red blood cell precursor cells being myeloid cells the gene that activates the hematopoietic stem cells to myeloid cells transformation is the Gata1 gene, the Gata1 gene needs to be overexpressed as well to create  myeloid cells from the culture using another promoter exactly like the ztp90 gene's over-expression vector but with Gata1 which will make the cells have enhanced self-renewal and myeloid production in the oxygenated culture.

 

Gene Map Retroviral Vector with augmented Gata1 insert

New-Bitmap-Image-39.png

 

Lastly, the myeloid cells upon production can be removed from the oxygenated mass production culture as needed and transformed over 9 days into red blood cells when mixed with erythropoietin, erythropoietin is a protein usually produced in the kidneys which is a protein messager that controls the transformation of myeloid cells into red blood cells when myeloid cells are exposed to erythropoietin for 9 days they will transform into red blood cells. erythropoietin can be produced within a plasmid for mass production which is produced by gene 7q22.1, which this can be used to mass expose myeloid cells to it, either it can be mixed in with the original culture or the genetically engineered myeloid cells moved to another culture for exposure and transformation into red blood cells.

 

download.jpg

 

Finally, just like normal blood this can be used for transfusion as now it is the same as natural red blood cells after this process which can be produced infinitely in bulk using this process, which this process can be used instead of extracting the blood but rather is a process for growing blood in the lab. This process directly makes the blood from stem cells which are genetically engineered for mass production and can be used for people with rare blood typed that are unable to receive a blood transfusion because of their blood type/RH factors, this allows anyone to produce blood from their own bone marrow/hematopoietic stem cells.

 

103109838-gettyimages-858822046.jpg

 

This was inspired by this video about blood transfusions and people with rare blood types.


Edited by VictorMedvil, 09 December 2019 - 08:02 PM.


#2 GAHD

GAHD

    Eldritch Horror

  • Administrators
  • 2825 posts

Posted 09 December 2019 - 08:17 PM

I wrote a couple papers on this topic (blood transfusion dangers) back in university. You might find it interesting that hemoglobin can be encapsulated in an artificial protein sheath and injected directly into plasma as a Red Blood Cell (RBC) alternative. There were a lot of studies done on alternative Heme delivery methods to try and make an artificial version of RBC due to blood and tissue type dangers.

Free Heme (without a cell wall or other protein sheath) has a lot of problems associated with it due to the rapid decay in plasma, it's size being just right to aggravate kidney failure, and it "scouring" the local plasma area of active molecules causing other problems such as vascular constriction. Despite that a few studies found that free-Heme can be used to extend shelf life of organs for transplant (as it can penetrate interstitial areas of organs), and in a pinch free heme can be used as a universal donor gas-interface blood plasma if the associated risks are out weighed by "they gonna die."



#3 VictorMedvil

VictorMedvil

    The Human Shadow

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2480 posts

Posted 09 December 2019 - 08:26 PM

I wrote a couple papers on this topic (blood transfusion dangers) back in university. You might find it interesting that hemoglobin can be encapsulated in an artificial protein sheath and injected directly into plasma as a Red Blood Cell (RBC) alternative. There were a lot of studies done on alternative Heme delivery methods to try and make an artificial version of RBC due to blood and tissue type dangers.

Free Heme (without a cell wall or other protein sheath) has a lot of problems associated with it due to the rapid decay in plasma, it's size being just right to aggravate kidney failure, and it "scouring" the local plasma area of active molecules causing other problems such as vascular constriction. Despite that a few studies found that free-Heme can be used to extend shelf life of organs for transplant (as it can penetrate interstitial areas of organs), and in a pinch free heme can be used as a universal donor gas-interface blood plasma if the associated risks are out weighed by "they gonna die."

Interesting that is not something that I knew, maybe that can also be used to keep the cells alive within the culture as a alternative to flowing blood thru them.