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Looking For Nuclear Engineering Must Reads


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#1 randomsoldier1337

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 04:22 PM

I'm asking for suggestions in various categories as some of them might be more important for coursework whereas others might be more recreational and to expand knowledge.

 

I know for example that Knoll is the go to for radiation detection and Lamarsh and Baratta is the most important for intro to nuclear engineering (of course some disagree with dumbing down in it, which is why I ask). Any books that anyone would like to recommend as a must have for core nuclear courses?

 

Other books that I'm looking for are more for my knowledge. For example, I found introductory nuclear physics by krane really helpful in explaining some of the concepts and bridging the gap between quantum/particle physics and nuclear for someone who hasn't had a rigorous physics background in those. Not to mention a fun read. But despite all that, it has been not useful for coursework and has been more recreational for me. Point is, I enjoy it for knowledge and recreation and I would like other suggestions for these as well so that I may expand my understanding of nuclear even if I don't formally take a course, please?

 

There is one pet peeve that I would like to address specifically, however. I'm unable to find much information on books that detail nuclear engineering from a fusion perspective. For example, materials and neutronics usually detail everything from fission reactor standpoints with a very minor aside, if at all, towards fusion. Any suggestions for those as well?


Edited by randomsoldier1337, 22 September 2019 - 04:28 PM.


#2 Flummoxed

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 05:02 AM

There are no commercial fusion reactors yet. It is still under development, but researchers are hoping to have it online by 2050.

"

The international tokamak experiment ITER, now being built in southern France. ITER – due to start up in 2025 – is designed to validate technology for the prototype power stations that are expected to follow it, and if successful should lead to electricity from fusion being on the grid by 2050."

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tokamak

 

Edit https://epsrc.ukri.o...fusiontokamaks/


Edited by Flummoxed, 23 September 2019 - 05:06 AM.

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#3 randomsoldier1337

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 05:40 AM

Ah thanks for that. Any suggestions to the rest? Must learns as a nuclear engineer or just good to know as a nuclear engineer/physicist?



#4 Flummoxed

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 02:56 AM

The AEA used to publish some good info on fision reactors, but dont appear to any more. 

 

This link should get you started, what level do you want? 

 

https://www.world-nu...ear-energy.aspx



#5 randomsoldier1337

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 06:26 AM

Senior/Graduate level would be good I think.



#6 VictorMedvil

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 06:32 AM

This is a good book on Fusion Energy,https://www.amazon.c...g/dp/0521733170 or for beginners https://www.amazon.c...JHK8984N2N7NXYV


Edited by VictorMedvil, 24 September 2019 - 06:36 AM.


#7 randomsoldier1337

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 08:34 AM

Thanks. I have read the second one. I have seen the first in my professors office. I'll be sure to check it out. Though I think they mostly focus on the plasma physics aspect with less attention to the neutronics and materials effects, such as plasma confinement and energy requirements for sustained fusion. I would really appreciate any suggestions for the neutronics and materials, if they exist.



#8 Flummoxed

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 09:28 AM

Perhaps wandering into your local university book shop, or university library might be a good starting point at graduate level. Some books suit some and not others, go and have a browse. Good books are not cheap https://www.springer...k/9783642235146



#9 randomsoldier1337

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 10:14 AM

Ah thanks. That's really helpful. I'll remember this for the future.