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Near Black Hole To Earth Radiation Anomaly


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#1 Dubbelosix

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 08:03 AM

I have just been made aware that a supermassive black hole passing close to the earth is giving off irregular (not predicted under standard model) radiation. Is this the first evidence of my equations which predicted that a moving black hole gives off more radiation than one stationary?

 

https://metro.co.uk/...diB7P6bx3HVfzfw

 

My original work that concluded this:

 

https://www.quora.co...lhuugpiubxcoxiq

 

The black hole is glowing strangely - is this just a dumbed down version of what my equations predicted when taking the black hole inequality straight into the fundamental physics of moving charges? I feel pretty confident now, but we'll see. 



#2 Flummoxed

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 12:36 PM

I have just been made aware that a supermassive black hole passing close to the earth is giving off irregular (not predicted under standard model) radiation. Is this the first evidence of my equations which predicted that a moving black hole gives off more radiation than one stationary?

 

https://metro.co.uk/...diB7P6bx3HVfzfw

 

My original work that concluded this:

 

https://www.quora.co...lhuugpiubxcoxiq

 

The black hole is glowing strangely - is this just a dumbed down version of what my equations predicted when taking the black hole inequality straight into the fundamental physics of moving charges? I feel pretty confident now, but we'll see. 

 

Is this not what Black holes do when they swallow something big.



#3 Dubbelosix

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 04:27 AM

Is this not what Black holes do when they swallow something big.

 

Quasars do yes. But this black hole is not a quasar - it is also showing off an unusual glow not predicted under any semi-classical model, except for mine. 



#4 Dubbelosix

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 04:28 AM

Keep in mind, only speculations are upholding that:

 

''It’s likely that the change is caused by an increase in the amount of gas being sucked into the black hole. A star called S0-2 passed by Sagittarius A* in 2018 and may have caused a reaction which sent more gas gushing into the hole. ‘The brightness variations are likely related to the amount of gas that falls into the black hole,’ tweeted astronomer Tuan Do, lead author of a paper on the hole’s strange glow.''



#5 Dubbelosix

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 04:32 AM

Or is it is a quasar in theory?

 

I never heard it was, this black hole is located in the center of our galaxy. It has been long speculated that if it ''woke up'' turning into a quasar it could reek havoc on the galaxy and any life in it. If a star contributed to the unusual glow, why can we not see evidence of it? Surely the star would be looking worse for wear. 



#6 Dubbelosix

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 04:35 AM

There is a lot of activity round this area, its not just passing stars. As I am reading, ''Magnetar found very close to the supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*, at the center of the Milky Way galaxy.''



#7 Dubbelosix

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 04:36 AM

It is glowing unusually, because it is [not a standard quasar]

 

''Ultimately, what is seen is not the black hole itself, but observations that are consistent only if there is a black hole present near Sgr A*. In the case of such a black hole, the observed radio and infrared energy emanates from gas and dust heated to millions of degrees while falling into the black hole.[32] The black hole itself is thought to emit only Hawking radiation at a negligible temperature, on the order of 10−14kelvin.''



#8 Dubbelosix

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 04:37 AM

Interestingly, there is more:

 

''observed gamma rays interacting with the nearby giant molecular cloud Sagittarius B2, causing X-ray emission from the cloud. The total luminosity from this outburst (L≈1,5×1039 erg/s) is estimated to be a million times stronger than the current output from Sgr A* and is comparable with a typical active galactic nucleus.[41][42] In 2011 this conclusion was supported by Japanese astronomers observing the Milky Way's center with the Suzaku satellite.[43]''

 

Provided by wiki



#9 Dubbelosix

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 04:40 AM

It's all very interesting, with about several major stars, two that possibly bound together, with an addition of a near-by magnetar makes this a very chaotic place to be in:

 

https://en.wikipedia.../Sagittarius_A*


Edited by Dubbelosix, 19 August 2019 - 04:40 AM.


#10 Dubbelosix

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 04:41 AM

https://www.aanda.or...aa33718-18.html



#11 Flummoxed

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Posted Yesterday, 05:56 AM

Quasars do yes. But this black hole is not a quasar - it is also showing off an unusual glow not predicted under any semi-classical model, except for mine. 

 

Much of astrophysics is speculation, which makes it intriguing, but blackholes when feeding do light up like quasars according to standard model https://en.wikipedia..._hole#Formation

"Accretion of interstellar gas onto supermassive black holes is the process responsible for powering quasars and other types of active galactic nuclei. "

They are also involved in the formation of galaxies https://phys.org/new...l-galaxies.html


Edited by Flummoxed, Yesterday, 05:56 AM.


#12 Dubbelosix

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Posted Yesterday, 07:33 AM

If I was in this arena, I'd be looking for evidence that the black hole has been feeding at all. We are only just making the first predictions on black holes based on observational evidence, if we cannot see it feeding, this may present a problem. More speculations amidst the issues.