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#1 hazelm

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Posted 04 August 2019 - 02:54 PM

Am I right that table salt should be 60% salt and 40% sodium?  Is it still pure table salt if it contains silicoaluminate, potassium iodide, dextrose and sodium bicarbonate?  I ask because it doesn't taste like table salt and is much finer grind.  Thank you. 



#2 exchemist

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 02:47 AM

Am I right that table salt should be 60% salt and 40% sodium?  Is it still pure table salt if it contains silicoaluminate, potassium iodide, dextrose and sodium bicarbonate?  I ask because it doesn't taste like table salt and is much finer grind.  Thank you.

Hazel, you have got this a bit garbled. The formula for table salt is NaCl. The atomic mass of Na is 23. For Cl it is 35.5 (it is not a whole number due to the mixture of isotopes that Cl consists of in nature.) So the molecular weight of NaCl is 23+35.5=58.5, which means it consists of about 40% Na and about 60% Cl.

The other chemicals you mention are probably additives, present in small amounts, to stop it clogging in humid conditions and for your health (iodide is added to prevent iodine deficiency for instance see goitre). The fineness of the crystals is a matter of choice in the supermarket.

#3 hazelm

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 05:04 AM

Hazel, you have got this a bit garbled. The formula for table salt is NaCl. The atomic mass of Na is 23. For Cl it is 35.5 (it is not a whole number due to the mixture of isotopes that Cl consists of in nature.) So the molecular weight of NaCl is 23+35.5=58.5, which means it consists of about 40% Na and about 60% Cl.

The other chemicals you mention are probably additives, present in small amounts, to stop it clogging in humid conditions and for your health (iodide is added to prevent iodine deficiency for instance see goitre). The fineness of the crystals is a matter of choice in the supermarket.

But, isn't that what I said?  Oh - 60% chloride.    All right.  But, you see,  if I'd known the answer I wouldn't have had it garbled. 

 

Good morning and keep cool if you can.  Hazel



#4 exchemist

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 11:45 AM

But, isn't that what I said?  Oh - 60% chloride.    All right.  But, you see,  if I'd known the answer I wouldn't have had it garbled. 
 
Good morning and keep cool if you can.  Hazel

It was raining here in Brittany this morning. Now it has cleared and we have 21C, with a breeze off the sea. More rain forecast for tomorrow.

#5 OceanBreeze

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 12:01 PM

What was the salt that used the advert "when it rains it pours" meaning that the salt would always pour no matter how wet the weather.

 

Did it have a special additive?



#6 OceanBreeze

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 12:08 PM

I see that it was Morton Salt and the additive was calcium silicate (CaSiO3). Calcium silicate can absorb a whole lot of liquid while still remaining a free-flowing powder. It can absorb, in fact, 1 to 2.5 times its own weight in liquid but when it comes to water, our chief concern, its absorption capacity is more like 600%. Yes, that’s right, it means this stuff can absorb 600 times its weight in water. 

 

The above is what I found on this site.: https://culinarylore...-when-it-rains/

 

I think they mad a mistake when they say the absorption capacity is 600% and that it can absorb 600 times its weight.

 

600% should be 6 times its weight.


Edited by OceanBreeze, 05 August 2019 - 12:11 PM.

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#7 exchemist

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 01:44 PM

I see that it was Morton Salt and the additive was calcium silicate (CaSiO3). Calcium silicate can absorb a whole lot of liquid while still remaining a free-flowing powder. It can absorb, in fact, 1 to 2.5 times its own weight in liquid but when it comes to water, our chief concern, its absorption capacity is more like 600%. Yes, that’s right, it means this stuff can absorb 600 times its weight in water. 
 
The above is what I found on this site.: https://culinarylore...-when-it-rains/
 
I think they mad a mistake when they say the absorption capacity is 600% and that it can absorb 600 times its weight.
 
600% should be 6 times its weight.

There seems to be some inconsistency here about which silicate it is. It looks to me as if it is the orthosilicate Ca2SiO4 that is the anti-caking agent. CaSiO3 seems to be a mineral called wollastonite, used in tile manufacture. Probably a bit crunchy to have in your table salt.

#8 hazelm

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 01:54 PM

What was the salt that used the advert "when it rains it pours" meaning that the salt would always pour no matter how wet the weather.

 

Did it have a special additive?

That was Morton's.  Morton's seems hard to find nowadays.  That is what brought on this search.  I went to two stores and found no Morton's.  So, bought another brand.  It is much finer than Morton's ahd doesn't much taste like table salt.  If I remember rightly - sitting in here and too lazy to walk to kitchen - it is only 30% sodium.  I don't know whether that matters or not.  Just know I want my Morton's back.  I grew up on that.  And it stressed the added iodide which we called Iodine.  Supposed to prevent goiter.  Don't hear much about that any more.



#9 exchemist

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 02:27 PM

That was Morton's.  Morton's seems hard to find nowadays.  That is what brought on this search.  I went to two stores and found no Morton's.  So, bought another brand.  It is much finer than Morton's ahd doesn't much taste like table salt.  If I remember rightly - sitting in here and too lazy to walk to kitchen - it is only 30% sodium.  I don't know whether that matters or not.  Just know I want my Morton's back.  I grew up on that.  And it stressed the added iodide which we called Iodine.  Supposed to prevent goiter.  Don't hear much about that any more.


It sounds as if you have bought a reduced sodium salt, in which a proportion of it is potassium chloride (KCl) instead of NaCl. It is recommended for people with high blood pressure. My mother used that towards the end of her life and she complained it did not taste the same. I think all table salt in the UK is iodised by law to prevent iodine deficiency. Don’t know about the US.

#10 hazelm

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 04:18 PM

It sounds as if you have bought a reduced sodium salt, in which a proportion of it is potassium chloride (KCl) instead of NaCl. It is recommended for people with high blood pressure. My mother used that towards the end of her life and she complained it did not taste the same. I think all table salt in the UK is iodised by law to prevent iodine deficiency. Don’t know about the US.

My thought also.  Not for me.  I am one of the rare exceptions in that I am low on sodium, not high.  Potato chips are welcome here.  Only our potato chip maker is reducing the salt in their chips. Next time I see  Mortons,  I shall buy some extra. 

 

Thanks.  Hazel



#11 fahrquad

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 12:06 AM

What was the salt that used the advert "when it rains it pours" meaning that the salt would always pour no matter how wet the weather.

 

Did it have a special additive?

 

That would be Morton's Salt.  The label lists Salt, Calcium Silicate (anti caking agent), Dextrose, and Potassium Iodide as ingredients.  As Exchemist mentioned, Iodine is added to prevent goiters.  Iodine is used by the thyroid gland to produce Thyroxine and the lack of Iodine causes the thyroid to swell resulting in the characteristic neck bulge.  People who live near the coast get plenty of Iodine from seafood, but people living inland would be susceptible to goiter, which prompted the addition of iodine.  People with low Thyroxine levels have depressed metabolic rates and other issues.

 

https://en.wikipedia...hyroid_hormones



#12 fahrquad

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 12:12 AM

My thought also.  Not for me.  I am one of the rare exceptions in that I am low on sodium, not high.  Potato chips are welcome here.  Only our potato chip maker is reducing the salt in their chips. Next time I see  Mortons,  I shall buy some extra. 

 

Thanks.  Hazel

 

I have never been much of a salt user, only adding it to boiling water when preparing pasta or sprinkling on onion rings, but at my last blood work I was low on both sodium and chloride and high on potassium, so now I am adding salt to just about everything.


Edited by fahrquad, 21 August 2019 - 12:13 AM.


#13 hazelm

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 06:42 AM

I have never been much of a salt user, only adding it to boiling water when preparing pasta or sprinkling on onion rings, but at my last blood work I was low on both sodium and chloride and high on potassium, so now I am adding salt to just about everything.

Do you suppose this situation is becoming more prevalent because so many companies are reducing the amount of sodium chloride in their products?   I have a friend who - with a heart condition - has to measure and report her potassium level daily, lest she get too much potassium which  is easier done than one would think.  We can't win for losing.