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Black Hole Warheads


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#1 VictorMedvil

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Posted 02 July 2019 - 03:07 AM

It has been long awaited but this is my thread about Black Hole Weapons and how with today's technology we could create Black Hole warheads, back in 2015 I was trying to figure out a way that Humans could defend ourselves from hostile Aliens if the species ever came under attack by a hostile alien species, one of the devices that was come up with was the idea of Black Hole Warheads which would create a Micro or Mini Black hole then destroy a star. Now you may ask how is this actually possible to do with the technology of the 21st century and this post will about how to create a Micro or Mini Black hole warhead which would cost around 20 Trillion dollars to produce but would destroy stars upon impact.

 

First we start with a design that is well known the Particle accelerator, these devices use magnetic fields to accelerate particles to near the speed of light and in some cases have been used to create Micro Black holes such as at CERN where in 2012 CERN had successful created a Micro Black Hole which evaporated very quickly due to lack of mass, but here is a video about CERN.

 

 

Continuing if we can accelerate protons together and smash them to create Mini black holes what is stopping us from doing this within the shell of a missile, the idea is we could create two particle accelerators within a missile and smash protons together exactly as what is being done at CERN, to create Micro Black holes within the mass of a Star this would cause the Micro Black Hole to grow into a normal black hole and not evaporate due to lack of mass as the black hole would have the mass of a star to feed upon eventually consuming the star over the period of growth of the black hole.

 

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The only engineering problem with this design with current technology is the device would have to be huge with current Superconducting Magnets to create a Black hole to get the Particle stream up to 6 Tev the size of the warhead would have to be large enough to allow two 27 Km sized particle accelerators to give birth to the Micro Black hole that will consume the star when detonated within it, but the destructive yield of this device is ‭23,900,000,000‬ Yottatons assuming it creates a average stellar supernova upon impact when the star turns into a Black hole from the Micro black hole cannibalizing all the mass of the star, as the mass of our Mini or Micro Black hole grows the Schwarzchild Radius will grow too and the entropy will stablize to the point that it doesn't evaporate leaving a black hole in place of the star.

 

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I hope you now see how it is possible to destroy a star with our current technology though it would require significant resources to construct even one of these devices called Black Hole Warheads, but within physics this technology works despite the massive size of each device, The Size of the Black hole created can be determined from the Mass of the Star it is destine for by using the Schwarzchild Radius Equation.

 

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As the mass grows so does the time that the black hole will exist grows to as decay time is directly related to mass as well, thus as the mass of the star is consumed by the growing black hole you could create a permanent Black hole in the star system that it was used in once it hits a critical mass the black hole will not decay, killing everything in the solar system by thermal death "Freezing" or by the possible supernova of the star as the Black hole consumes its mass.

 

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This requires that you put a very density material around the Micro or Mini Black hole to start the initial growth of the black hole such as Thorium or Plutonium as to make sure the black hole doesn't evaporate before it can eat from the Star's Mass and grow into a star destroying black hole.

 

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Edited by VictorMedvil, 02 July 2019 - 04:46 AM.


#2 VictorMedvil

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 07:42 AM

Alright Dubbel, I need your expertise for something dealing with these Warheads how much Density per second would be required for the material to sustain a black hole from evaporation at 16 Tev of Mass being the Black Hole using the Stefan-Boltzmann law? 


Edited by VictorMedvil, 03 July 2019 - 07:44 AM.


#3 Dubbelosix

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 07:51 AM

A black hole would evaporate very easily unless it came very close to the observable matter - there is not enough virtual energy in a vacuum to sustain a black hole to keep it alive, which is why no stable, lone black hole can survive at all - it looses far too much energy than what is required to sustain it. Nor can a black hole be infinitely stable in the ground state, unlike a hydrogen atom, because it follows a very strict set of thermodynamic laws in which it gives off the energy far too quickly proportional to its size... am I understand your question correctly?

 

If a small black hole, say the size of the united kingdom came as close to our planet from the distance of say Jupiter, it would start to rip the surface off the planet. Using a black hole of such a scale, or even smaller, would mean immediate death to all those living on the planet... back in the days when I was on sciforums, a person did write a book but I forget its name now, in which a wandering black hole came into the solar system and caused great havoc... I think it was called something like the ''wandering visitor'' or something along those lines.



#4 VictorMedvil

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 07:54 AM

A black hole would evaporate very easily unless it came very close to the observable matter - there is not enough virtual energy in a vacuum to sustain a black hole to keep it alive, which is why no stable, lone black hole can survive at all - it looses far too much energy than what is required to sustain it. Nor can a black hole be infinitely stable in the ground state, unlike a hydrogen atom, because it follows a very strict set of thermodynamic laws in which it gives off the energy far too quickly proportional to its size... am I understand your question correctly?

 

If a small black hole, say the size of the united kingdom came as close to our planet from the distance of say Jupiter, it would start to rip the surface off the planet. Using a black hole of such a scale, or even smaller, would mean immediate death to all those living on the planet... back in the days when I was on sciforums, a person did write a book but I forget its name now, in which a wandering black hole came into the solar system and caused great havoc... I think it was called something like the ''wandering visitor'' or something along those lines.

 

 

Would it be dDMaterial/dtEvaporation = (-16πG2 MBH2 / C4)(1/(10C2))1/2 ((4c12/(4096πG4 kb4 MBH))/(C2  dVmaterial) = -ABHσBHTBH4 /dVmaterial ? Which basically comes out to ‭176,062,111,267.764‬ Density Volume Per second to stabilize the black hole. So to actually create the black hole you would need a dense shell of material with much volume to actually start the black hole before it hits the star, if it were thorium with a density of 11,720 kg per m, you would need a volume of 15,022 kmin the first second to start the black hole reaction which can be achieved due to the strong gravitational forces of the BH would begin to draw in the star's matter which has a density of 1410 kg per m3. So the initial conditions are very important, this device must detonate inside the Star to work. In ‭‭.00000354 seconds within the star it would absorb that much Volume required at a velocity of attraction of C, which meets the requirement of 15,022 kmin 1 second to avoid evaporation of the Mini or Micro Black Hole, thus there is one truth to this matter these devices must be detonated within a dense object to set off the chain reaction that destroys stars.


Edited by VictorMedvil, 03 July 2019 - 10:32 AM.


#5 Dubbelosix

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 09:05 AM

I struggle a bit following this type of diction, can you do latex?



#6 VictorMedvil

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 09:13 AM

I struggle a bit following this type of diction, can you do latex?

 

I solved it which seems to be correct, sorry dubbel I am no good at latex and always error it you will have to make due, read up I did the calculation for a 16 Tev Black hole.


Edited by VictorMedvil, 03 July 2019 - 09:16 AM.


#7 VictorMedvil

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Posted 04 July 2019 - 05:43 AM

A black hole would evaporate very easily unless it came very close to the observable matter - there is not enough virtual energy in a vacuum to sustain a black hole to keep it alive, which is why no stable, lone black hole can survive at all - it looses far too much energy than what is required to sustain it. Nor can a black hole be infinitely stable in the ground state, unlike a hydrogen atom, because it follows a very strict set of thermodynamic laws in which it gives off the energy far too quickly proportional to its size... am I understand your question correctly?

 

If a small black hole, say the size of the united kingdom came as close to our planet from the distance of say Jupiter, it would start to rip the surface off the planet. Using a black hole of such a scale, or even smaller, would mean immediate death to all those living on the planet... back in the days when I was on sciforums, a person did write a book but I forget its name now, in which a wandering black hole came into the solar system and caused great havoc... I think it was called something like the ''wandering visitor'' or something along those lines.

 

Thanks for your insight dubbel that calculations seems to agree with you that indeed even a small black hole of 16 Tev would be enough to destroy a star given a close enough proximity to give it enough mass as to not evaporate though and cease to be a black hole it seems you will always be fighting Evaporation at small sizes such as the 16 Tev example which would be the largest artificial Black hole that humans could create with current technology but larger ones would have small evaporation effects thus would not be as much of a issue, but even a small one would suffice to destroy a star or planet if given the proper initial conditions to avoid losing its black hole status to evaporation. It is funny something like a spark if a black hole could destroy a planet or star but that is the nature of black hole's even stellar black hole's probably start as a very small one like these, just little sparks that consume everything and grow to the size of Super massive black hole someday given enough mass, it is amazing the size growth of these.


Edited by VictorMedvil, 04 July 2019 - 05:50 AM.