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The Inconvenient Truth About Genetics

genetics self-assembly design development organism cell genome

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#86 FreelanceScientists

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 06:58 PM

I know that this is an old thread already, but I have a question. Since you really seem to know what you are talking about, I thought that I would ask you. It's sort of a Frankenstien question. There are elements and there is physics. Then there is the cell, an advanced evolutionary product. Through the bilayers down the scafolding into the protoplasm reading the codons being assisted by ribosomes to make the amino proteins to build the multicellular organism. Ok. But it has to start with the cell itself. What did evolution do to make something that complex and magical. The cell has to be the starting point. Now the actual question. I took a cutting from a fig plant, healthy, and put it in a sterile glass with distilled water. It became a stick. Now I know that the cutting still has all the dna in it and the cells should be mostly intact. How do I get that stick to produce figs again. It's a hard question and I don't mind an answer like it has become elements and physics again. Thanks.



#87 Farming guy

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 03:41 PM

Now... it is not fat which causes fat, it is indeed sugar that is converted into fat. Have you never heard of the Atkins diet? Besides, there are published papers on this subject, it should be easy to find. Its a common myth that people believe a reduced fat product will reduce your fat but its actually the sugar content which you have to watch out for.

It may be interesting to point out something which many people are not aware, that for certain diabetics, high blood sugar can happen even while avoiding sugar, because the liver can produce sugar from fat.



#88 Flummoxed

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 03:17 AM

I know that this is an old thread already, but I have a question. Since you really seem to know what you are talking about, I thought that I would ask you. It's sort of a Frankenstien question. There are elements and there is physics. Then there is the cell, an advanced evolutionary product. Through the bilayers down the scafolding into the protoplasm reading the codons being assisted by ribosomes to make the amino proteins to build the multicellular organism. Ok. But it has to start with the cell itself. What did evolution do to make something that complex and magical. The cell has to be the starting point. Now the actual question. I took a cutting from a fig plant, healthy, and put it in a sterile glass with distilled water. It became a stick. Now I know that the cutting still has all the dna in it and the cells should be mostly intact. How do I get that stick to produce figs again. It's a hard question and I don't mind an answer like it has become elements and physics again. Thanks.

 

You need to plant the cutting with buds and leaves in some soil. If your twig has any life left in it the buds convert into roots, and you have a new tree. One of my neigbours gave my wife some fig tree cuttings which 2 weeks later in the ground appears to be still living. The cutting was placed 18 inches into the soil with about 2 feet sticking out.

 

I have no idea why my wife accepted his gift/garden rubbish, I already have a huge fig tree, with more figs than I can eat :)



#89 FreelanceScientists

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 06:28 AM

Small pear trees are also fun. Unusual plant. The cutting that I used was small and had healthy leaves to start. Not sure about the buds. I thought it was about to take root at one point although it just might have been some kind of mold. Googled rooting and it seems to be the most difficult part of plants. This I think goes into the category of cloning plants. According to what I have googled cloning can even be done from chopped up leaves. Not sure about how that one works. Plants like other living biological organisms use sugars and phosphorus and things. They make it in the leaves. The magnesium based chloroplasts do some electrolysis osmosis number to produce it. I don't know if they store up fats or not. It seemed to me that the cutting had all the necessary parts and materials, why it wasn't able to take root I don't know. Wasn't enough of the right stuff is my guess. Needs soil and nutrients and help on the rooting. Try the small pear trees. Had one in the yard, no leaves or anything, thought it was time to varnish it. Kept watering along with the rest of the plants, in august two pears appeared on one of it's twig branches. There weren't any leaves or anything on this tree all season. This makes a pear tree, at least to me, seem an unusual plant. So there's still no hope for the stick in the glass from the fig just yet. Seems there should be something.





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