Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Planets Surviving Without A Host Star?


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 hazelm

hazelm

    Explaining

  • Members
  • 960 posts

Posted 15 May 2019 - 06:32 AM

https://www.scienced...p Science News)

 

According to a study by astronomers at Warwick University, small rocky planets with densely packed elements just outside the destruction radius might survive the death of their host star.

 

Q.  What then?  Can planets survive with no star to orbit and interact with?  Is that what "exoplanets" are - planets drifting alone in space?  Could there be life on these survivors? 



#2 Flummoxed

Flummoxed

    Explaining

  • Members
  • 569 posts

Posted 15 May 2019 - 08:44 AM

https://www.scienced...p Science News)

 

According to a study by astronomers at Warwick University, small rocky planets with densely packed elements just outside the destruction radius might survive the death of their host star.

 

Q.  What then?  Can planets survive with no star to orbit and interact with?  Is that what "exoplanets" are - planets drifting alone in space?  Could there be life on these survivors? 

 

Without a sun its going to get very cold on the surface of the planet. Likely it will be frozen solid, but perhaps with a bit of Volcanic activity, it might be warm enough in places for life to survive. Eventually it could drift into another solar system and perhaps collide with other planets. Venus for example spins the opposite way to the rest of the planets, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venus It is thought that Mars and Earth both have had massive collisions in their early history, and is where the moons come from. https://medium.com/s...s-a8a1832104dc 


  • hazelm likes this

#3 hazelm

hazelm

    Explaining

  • Members
  • 960 posts

Posted 15 May 2019 - 09:38 AM

Without a sun its going to get very cold on the surface of the planet. Likely it will be frozen solid, but perhaps with a bit of Volcanic activity, it might be warm enough in places for life to survive. Eventually it could drift into another solar system and perhaps collide with other planets. Venus for example spins the opposite way to the rest of the planets, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venus It is thought that Mars and Earth both have had massive collisions in their early history, and is where the moons come from. https://medium.com/s...s-a8a1832104dc 

Thank you.  I was thinking I have read about drifting planets but thought maybe I'd dreamed it.  I had not thought of volcanic activity.  Stored up heat in what we eventually call lava?  I once went looking for a good book about volcanoes- what causes them to form.  Not so much activate ss their source and what forms that.  All I found were children's books.  Who knows.  Maybe one of them tells but I hoped for more.

 

But, yes, we need heat for life - on Earth, at least.  We can't be sure on some faraway drifting planet.  Thank you.



#4 Flummoxed

Flummoxed

    Explaining

  • Members
  • 569 posts

Posted 15 May 2019 - 11:53 AM

Thank you.  I was thinking I have read about drifting planets but thought maybe I'd dreamed it. 

 

Perhaps you were not dreaming :) 

 

https://www.space.co...ight-speed.html


  • hazelm likes this

#5 hazelm

hazelm

    Explaining

  • Members
  • 960 posts

Posted 15 May 2019 - 04:20 PM

Perhaps you were not dreaming :)

 

https://www.space.co...ight-speed.html

I wonder about that statement about any possible life on such a planet having a wild ride.  If I remember rightly, our own planet mover pretty fast but we, as riders on it are not aware of the speed.  True?  Thank you for the notice.  Interesting.



#6 Flummoxed

Flummoxed

    Explaining

  • Members
  • 569 posts

Posted 16 May 2019 - 04:27 AM

I wonder about that statement about any possible life on such a planet having a wild ride.  If I remember rightly, our own planet mover pretty fast but we, as riders on it are not aware of the speed.  True?  Thank you for the notice.  Interesting.

 

You are welcome.

 

We are on our way in the direction of the constellation of Leo according to blue shift measured in the CBR. 


Edited by Flummoxed, 16 May 2019 - 04:28 AM.