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The Logical Constructs Of Easter


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#1 petrushkagoogol

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 06:37 AM

The logical constructs of Easter
 
Are there any logical constructs in the semantics of Easter -
 
Well....
 
  1. Every day is not a Sunday
  2. Easter Sunday comes only once a year
  3. All is well that ends well (Eostre = new Dawn)
 
Could we say that there are elements of logic in the context of Easter Sunday ? :sherlock:
 


#2 fahrquad

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 07:37 AM

Easter is a Christian celebration of the return of the zombie god from the dead.

 

"Easter and the holidays that are related to it are moveable feasts which do not fall on a fixed date in the Gregorian or Julian calendars which follow only the cycle of the Sun; rather, its date is offset from the date of Passover and is therefore calculated based on a lunisolar calendar similar to the Hebrew calendar. The First Council of Nicaea (325) established two rules, independence of the Jewish calendar and worldwide uniformity, which were the only rules for Easter explicitly laid down by the council. No details for the computation were specified; these were worked out in practice, a process that took centuries and generated a number of controversies. It has come to be the first Sunday after the ecclesiastical full moon that occurs on or soonest after 21 March,[12] but calculations vary.

 

Easter is linked to the Jewish Passover by much of its symbolism, as well as by its position in the calendar. In most European languages the feast is called by the words for passover in those languages; and in the older English versions of the Bible the term Easter was the term used to translate passover.[13]Easter customs vary across the Christian world, and include sunrise services, exclaiming the Paschal greeting, clipping the church,[14] and decorating Easter eggs (symbols of the empty tomb).[15][16][17] The Easter lily, a symbol of the resurrection,[18][19] traditionally decorates the chancel area of churches on this day and for the rest of Eastertide.[20] Additional customs that have become associated with Easter and are observed by both Christians and some non-Christians include egg hunting, the Easter Bunny, and Easter parades.[21][22][23] There are also various traditional Easter foods that vary regionally."

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter


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#3 fahrquad

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 07:48 AM

The first paragraph in post #2 above explains why the Eastern Orthodox and Catholic derived churches* celebrate Easter on different Sundays although they coincide every 4 years.  This year the Catholic Easter fell on April 21 and the Eastern Orthodox Easter fell on April 28.

 

"The East–West Schism, also called the Great Schism and the Schism of 1054, was the break of communion between what are now the Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox churches, which had lasted until the 11th century.[1] The Schism was the culmination of theological and political differences between the Christian East and West which had developed over the preceding centuries.

A succession of ecclesiastical differences and theological disputes between the Greek East and Latin West pre-dated the formal rupture that occurred in 1054.[2][3][4] Prominent among these were the issues of the procession of the Holy Spirit, whether leavened or unleavened bread should be used in the Eucharist,[a] the Bishop of Rome's claim to universal jurisdiction, and the place of the See of Constantinople in relation to the Pentarchy.[8]

In 1053, the first step was taken in the process which led to formal schism: the Greek churches in southern Italy were forced either to close or to conform to Latin practices.[9][10][11] In retaliation, the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Michael I Cerularius ordered the closure of all Latin churches in Constantinople. In 1054, the papal legate sent by Leo IX travelled to Constantinople for purposes that included refusing to Cerularius the title of "Ecumenical Patriarch" and insisting that he recognize the Pope's claim to be the head of all the churches.[2] The main purpose of the papal legation was to seek help from the Byzantine Emperor in view of the Norman conquest of southern Italy and to deal with recent attacks by Leo of Ohrid against the use of unleavened bread and other Western customs,[12] attacks that had the support of Cerularius. Historian Axel Bayer says the legation was sent in response to two letters, one from the Emperor seeking assistance in arranging a common military campaign by the eastern and western empires against the Normans, and the other from Cerularius.[13] On the refusal of Cerularius to accept the demand, the leader of the legation, Cardinal Humbert of Silva Candida, O.S.B., excommunicated him, and in return Cerularius excommunicated Humbert and the other legates.[2] This was only the first act in a centuries-long process that eventually became a complete schism.[14]"

 

https://en.wikipedia...ast–West_Schism

 

*Churches that derive from the Catholic church after the Great Schism of 1054 AD include Lutheran, Episcopalian, Presbyterian, Baptist, etc... ad infinitum.


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#4 fahrquad

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 08:04 AM

Throwing a slaughtered pig on the altar of an Eastern Orthodox church was considered a great insult that still rankles 965 years later.  One significant difference between Orthodoxy and Catholicism is that the Orthodox church allows priest to marry and the Catholic church does not, which largely explains why the Catholic church has sexual abuse cases in the news.

 

https://en.wikipedia...Orthodox_Church

https://en.wikipedia...Catholic_Church



#5 exchemist

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 08:14 AM

Throwing a slaughtered pig on the altar of an Eastern Orthodox church was considered a great insult that still rankles 965 years later.  One significant difference between Orthodoxy and Catholicism is that the Orthodox church allows priest to marry and the Catholic church does not, which largely explains why the Catholic church has sexual abuse cases in the news.

 

https://en.wikipedia...Orthodox_Church

https://en.wikipedia...Catholic_Church

Though Orthodox bishops have to be celibate, I think. And the Catholic church is far from the only church with a disgraceful record of child abuse. There is Church of England case in the news at the moment and a Church of Scotland one too, I think. (Also I somehow doubt that in Greece and Russia the press and authorities are quite as hot on the topic of clerical abuse as we are in W Europe and N America.  

 

I very much agree though that a lot of problems would be solved by both married priests and, equally importantly, women priests in the Catholic church.


Edited by exchemist, 01 May 2019 - 08:17 AM.


#6 fahrquad

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 08:34 AM

The logical constructs of Easter
 
Are there any logical constructs in the semantics of Easter -
 
Well....
  1. Every day is not a Sunday
  2. Easter Sunday comes only once a year
  3. All is well that ends well (Eostre = new Dawn)
Could we say that there are elements of logic in the context of Easter Sunday ? :sherlock:

 

As to your mention of Eostre vs Easter, this is another ploy by the church to co-opt an existing pagan celebration just like Christmas co-opted the winter solstice celebration.  Jesus was actually born somewhere between September and October.  Considering our calendar is based on the supposed date of birth of Jesus, it is interesting that he was born some time between 6BC and 6AD (or BCE and ACE as they are known in PC-speak).

 

"As for the month of Jesus' birth, it can be inferred to be summer or fall. Combining inferences from when shepherds would likely be in the fields and working backward from Zechariah's priestly service (John the Baptist's father) and its connections to Jesus' birth, one arrives at a likely date of mid-September to early October. This would suggest the conception of Jesus might have been in December, but not his birth."

 

https://www.thefield...er-eostre-24035

https://www.britanni...topic/Christmas

https://en.wikipedia..._birth_of_Jesus



#7 fahrquad

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 08:43 AM

Though Orthodox bishops have to be celibate, I think. And the Catholic church is far from the only church with a disgraceful record of child abuse. There is Church of England case in the news at the moment and a Church of Scotland one too, I think. (Also I somehow doubt that in Greece and Russia the press and authorities are quite as hot on the topic of clerical abuse as we are in W Europe and N America.  

 

I very much agree though that a lot of problems would be solved by both married priests and, equally importantly, women priests in the Catholic church.

 

I am not sure about the Orthodox bishops being celibate and I am not about to call my mother to ask (her dad, one brother, and one brother-in-law were Orthodox priests).  I did my 40 minutes of purgatory yesterday.  I would assume the bishops were not celibate since they are elevated from the priesthood and divorce is not recognized, so short of a tragic accident or murder none would logically be allowed to be "promoted".



#8 Flummoxed

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 09:11 AM

 

All is well that ends well (Eostre = new Dawn)
 
Could we say that there are elements of logic in the context of Easter Sunday ? :sherlock:

 

 

Eostre is a pagan party, celebrated long before Christianity was approved by Rome https://www.theguard...pagan-symbolism.

Romes empire was in a downward spiral when Christianity beliefs were agreed. Romes empire spread across much of Europe and parts of Africa with peoples with different belief systems. Perhaps including as many of the beliefs and festivities from all the other religions at the time, under one common religion Christianity controlled by Rome, might have seemed like a good way of getting people in the empire to get along.  :innocent: 



#9 Dubbelosix

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 09:12 AM

Eostre is a pagan party, celebrated long before Christianity was approved by Rome https://www.theguard...pagan-symbolism.

Romes empire was in a downward spiral when Christianity beliefs were agreed. Romes empire spread across much of Europe and parts of Africa with peoples with different belief systems. Perhaps including as many of the beliefs and festivities from all the other religions at the time, under one common religion Christianity controlled by Rome, might have seemed like a good way of getting people in the empire to get along.  :innocent: 

 

 

I thought Eostre was the goddess worshiped, on no less, Easter Island? Or am I getting confused?



#10 Dubbelosix

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 09:15 AM

I did a check, it seems I was wrong about that. I like gems like this that get the old brain cells working.



#11 exchemist

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 09:20 AM

I am not sure about the Orthodox bishops being celibate and I am not about to call my mother to ask (her dad, one brother, and one brother-in-law were Orthodox priests).  I did my 40 minutes of purgatory yesterday.  I would assume the bishops were not celibate since they are elevated from the priesthood and divorce is not recognized, so short of a tragic accident or murder none would logically be allowed to be "promoted".

According to this: https://en.wikipedia...Orthodox_Church. the bishops seems to be drawn not from the regular priests but from monastic orders.



#12 fahrquad

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 09:45 AM

According to this: https://en.wikipedia...Orthodox_Church. the bishops seems to be drawn not from the regular priests but from monastic orders.

 

I am not sure about the Orthodox bishops being celibate and I am not about to call my mother to ask (her dad, one brother, and one brother-in-law were Orthodox priests).  I did my 40 minutes of purgatory yesterday.  I would assume the bishops were not celibate since they are elevated from the priesthood and divorce is not recognized, so short of a tragic accident or murder none would logically be allowed to be "promoted".

 

Ironically not 10 minutes after I made this comment I had to endure another 25 minutes of my mother rambling on about her dermatologist, her time share at Hilton Head, my sister and her kids, my dad not doing anything, and a thousand other unrelated topics.  I am not sure what I did in a past life that I am atoning for, but it must have been a doozy. If I wasn't waiting to hear from the guy coming to fix my spotty DSL service I would turn the phone off and/or pop it in the microwave.



#13 fahrquad

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 09:49 AM

According to this: https://en.wikipedia...Orthodox_Church. the bishops seems to be drawn not from the regular priests but from monastic orders.

 

I was not aware of this, but then I rejected this and all other religions at the age of 15.  Thanx for the info.

 

"In the Orthodox Church, from about the sixth century, it has been the rule that bishops are single men or widowers. Bishops are also usually in at least the first degree of monastic orders."



#14 fahrquad

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 12:59 PM

Eostre is a pagan party, celebrated long before Christianity was approved by Rome https://www.theguard...pagan-symbolism.

Romes empire was in a downward spiral when Christianity beliefs were agreed. Romes empire spread across much of Europe and parts of Africa with peoples with different belief systems. Perhaps including as many of the beliefs and festivities from all the other religions at the time, under one common religion Christianity controlled by Rome, might have seemed like a good way of getting people in the empire to get along.  :innocent: 

 

Trust the X-tians to ruin a good time of drunken debauchery with a tale of torture and execution that has a feeble happy ending.  I am of the opinion that the Roman Empire embraced Christianity as a means of controlling the populace.  Notice how the church and state melded into one organization known as the "Holy Roman Empire".  Even during the Crusades clerics traveled with the troops to convert and conquer.  Anyhow, the emergence of the Byzantine Empire is a story for another day. 

 

https://en.wikipedia...yzantine_Empire


Edited by fahrquad, 01 May 2019 - 01:10 PM.


#15 fahrquad

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 01:21 PM

I thought Eostre was the goddess worshiped, on no less, Easter Island? Or am I getting confused?

 

The population of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) consists of 887 Moai people with tattoos that appear distinctly Maori in origin.

 

800px-Tepano%2C_Oster-Insulaners_auf_Tah

 

https://en.wikipedia...Rapa_Nui_people



#16 fahrquad

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 01:23 PM

Here is a group of indigenous Moai.

 

33754075822_3a73351a59_h-1.jpg



#17 Flummoxed

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 02:31 PM

Trust the X-tians to ruin a good time of drunken debauchery with a tale of torture and execution that has a feeble happy ending.  I am of the opinion that the Roman Empire embraced Christianity as a means of controlling the populace.  Notice how the church and state melded into one organization known as the "Holy Roman Empire".  Even during the Crusades clerics traveled with the troops to convert and conquer.  Anyhow, the emergence of the Byzantine Empire is a story for another day. 

 

https://en.wikipedia...yzantine_Empire

 

I wonder if you had a bunch of people in a troubled empire built on conflicting scientific or religious principles, some one could come up with a standard model of theories, as told by the men of old, in the new scientific/religious empire. Would this belief system controlled by old men and a few women(hazel), be easily persuaded that the entire belief system of the day was based on (avoiding carefully using the word bollocks) flawed ideas. 

 

What does it take to burn a belief into the human mind?


Edited by Flummoxed, 01 May 2019 - 02:32 PM.