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Coronal Streamers' Light


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#1 hazelm

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 09:10 AM

The coronal streamers - which we normally do not see but will during the solar eclipse - become solar winds.  I am wondering something.  If we see the coronal streamers, are they not giving off light?  And, since light can travel around corners to a certain extent, would that not mean they would light up at least a small part of the dark side of the moon?  Just a rim of what we usually do not see on the dark side?

 

Of course, it may depend on what kind of light they are reflecting.  Is it their own light?  Or is it a light reflected from the sun to the streamers?  Would that make a difference?  I don't think so.  The moon has no light of its own but we see it.  So, that is reflected light it received from the sun.

 

Thank you.



#2 Turtle

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:23 PM

'Dark side' of the moon is something of a misnomer; it is better to refer to the back side. Solar eclipses occur only at new Moons, so the back side is entirely lit. The Moon is tidally locked to Earth so we always only see one side. There is a slight wobble that lets us see sometimes a bit more or less of the back at the edges of our side. A Moon 'day' lasts 2 weeks of Earth time, and the same for a Moon 'night'. This is the phase cycle of 1 month from full to full.
 
I'm not sure how much of the visible light and other radiation of the streamers is reflected and/or emitted. Here's a good source for images of the Sun from satellites as well as explanatory articles. > Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)

#3 hazelm

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:12 AM

'Dark side' of the moon is something of a misnomer; it is better to refer to the back side. Solar eclipses occur only at new Moons, so the back side is entirely lit. The Moon is tidally locked to Earth so we always only see one side. There is a slight wobble that lets us see sometimes a bit more or less of the back at the edges of our side. A Moon 'day' lasts 2 weeks of Earth time, and the same for a Moon 'night'. This is the phase cycle of 1 month from full to full.
 
I'm not sure how much of the visible light and other radiation of the streamers is reflected and/or emitted. Here's a good source for images of the Sun from satellites as well as explanatory articles. > Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)

You have it right, of course.  My misnomer.  It's dark to me.  I spent a lot of time yesterday searching, reading and sharing with a friend.  It seems the answer is yes.  The streamers reflect the light they get from the sun  and that light does reach around the back side of the moon.  My friend sent a picture showing the reddish glow that results. 

 

This is going to be something to see.   And I don't have to chase it.  It is coming to me.  :bow: :nahnahbooboo: