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How Could Tachyons Be Detected?


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#1 Farming guy

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 06:59 AM

Suppose you wanted to prove the existence of faster than light particles.  How would you detect them, and how would you prove that you detected them?



#2 DrKrettin

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 11:10 AM

These are rather unfair questions, because you can have no idea what the properties of tachyons would be. So how could you devise a method for detecting them? If you did manage to detect them, presumably you could prove it by measuring their arrival at a target before you switched the emitter on.



#3 Farming guy

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 04:08 PM

These are rather unfair questions, because you can have no idea what the properties of tachyons would be. So how could you devise a method for detecting them? If you did manage to detect them, presumably you could prove it by measuring their arrival at a target before you switched the emitter on.

Well, sure, they are unfair questions, and that is the problem, isn't it?  How would you know that you were emitting tachyons and not merely absorbing ordinary particles that you had earlier detected?  

 

Sorry, I have no idea why these questions started bouncing around my mind today.  Too much coffee or not enough.



#4 Dubbelosix

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 03:00 AM

Suppose you wanted to prove the existence of faster than light particles.  How would you detect them, and how would you prove that you detected them?

 

 

You would look for Cherenkov radiation. Some particles actually behave like tachyons in certain mediums.


Edited by Dubbelosix, 11 August 2017 - 03:00 AM.


#5 Farming guy

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:10 PM

You would look for Cherenkov radiation. Some particles actually behave like tachyons in certain mediums.

Okay, so I had to look up Cherenkov radiation, and although quite interesting, I don't think that would quite do it because you need a medium, and behaving like tachyons is not the same thing as being tachyons.  The backwards time travel thing relies on the speed of light in a vacuum in the equations, and not the speed of light in a medium.

 

Again, any particle traveling backwards in time relative to us would just be a part of our past, and really hard to differentiate from stuff we see all the time.  Or should I have had one less cup of coffee today?



#6 DrKrettin

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 06:49 AM

Or should I have had one less cup of coffee today?

 

Nope, one fewer.  :nahnahbooboo:



#7 Farming guy

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:39 AM

Nope, one fewer.  :nahnahbooboo:

I stand corrected. :joker:



#8 Dubbelosix

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 08:05 PM

Okay, so I had to look up Cherenkov radiation, and although quite interesting, I don't think that would quite do it because you need a medium, and behaving like tachyons is not the same thing as being tachyons.  The backwards time travel thing relies on the speed of light in a vacuum in the equations, and not the speed of light in a medium.

 

Again, any particle traveling backwards in time relative to us would just be a part of our past, and really hard to differentiate from stuff we see all the time.  Or should I have had one less cup of coffee today?

 

 

Yes, but the point is you would look for Cherenkov radiation. What I explained was a special case which does indeed require a different kind of medium, but the physics is still the same.