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Is Space Zero Gravity (0 G)

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#1 Darky

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 05:06 PM

Hi all,

In school, we've been taught that while in space; we can float around and have no weight at all. You can float around, yes. Having no weight at all is an entirely different story.

The formula for weight is what? : Mass * Gravity.

Now if I'm to prove my point, I need to first prove that space isn't Zero-G (Zero Gravity). Let's for instance take the sun; all planets are in a orbit around it, due to? Yes, Gravity! So if for some reason you jumped out of your rocket, you won't leave the Galaxy. You'll just obtain an orbit around the sun unless you're accelerating at high levels. So this is confirmed that space has gravity. Gravity keeping the planets in orbit. However, that's only the big picture, as stars aren't the only thing giving gravity. It has been proven that anything with mass has a gravitational pull. For example, Earth. If space had Zero-Gravity, why the nincapoops (my polite way of saying '****') is the moon in a fixed orbit around Earth. Yes the gravitational pull is low, but there is always gravity in space.

Not only does this correct our learning on gravity and tell us the truth about space, it also proves that even in space, you have a weight, just extremely low. Zero-Gravity may not be the right word to describe space - so let's use Micro-Gravity instead.

Regards and hopes that you take this positively and use this to carry on your projects,

Darky.

#2 sanctus

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 02:31 AM

Noone says that in space there is no gravity. The force of gravity is F=G*m1*m2/r^2 therefore gravitational forces just decreases reaching zero at infinity--> hence never.

Astronauts in orbit as well as satellites are just in free fall...



#3 Darky

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:13 AM

Noone says that in space there is no gravity. The force of gravity is F=G*m1*m2/r^2 therefore gravitational forces just decreases reaching zero at infinity--> hence never.
Astronauts in orbit as well as satellites are just in free fall...


Hi,

Thanks for adding in the maths.

Check most sources/books and they prefer to gravity in space as Zero-G (which is clearly wrong).

#4 A-wal

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:19 AM

Anything in free-fall experiences (almost) 0G.

 

What you feel as your 'weight' is actually the ground pushing you 'up'. The gravity pulling you down is more or less uniform so you don't feel it but the electro-magnetic force pushing you up is concentrated on your points of contact with the ground. That's why it's more comfortable to spread the points of contact by sitting or laying down. ;)



#5 Darky

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:27 AM

Anything in free-fall experiences (almost) 0G.
 
What you feel as your 'weight' is actually the ground pushing you 'up'. The gravity pulling you down is more or less uniform so you don't feel it but the electro-magnetic force pushing you up is concentrated on your points of contact with the ground. That's why it's more comfortable to spread the points of contact by sitting or laying down. ;)


Hi,

You're correct on the most part. However, there is nothing known as 0G. It's 0.0001G at certain times - never 0G. 0G is theoretically only possible when two objects of the exact same mass having the same gravitational pull and something between them (lets call it T1). In such case, T1 would be experiencing 0G due to forces cancelling each other out. However, this is just a theory, and I suppose there may be a tiny gravitational pull of something near to those two objects (near as in the grand-scale of space) making it 1E-2000 G. That is : 10^(-2000) but never, ever, 0G.

#6 A-wal

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:30 AM

Correct, nothing ever truly experience 0G but it can very easily be so low as to be negligible.





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