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Learning Science Through Fiction


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#1 Farming guy

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 07:49 AM

I recently annoyed someone with a post about the Wizard of Oz.  Although I was trying to provide some levity, there was an actual chemistry question there.

 

Is there no room in education for that sort of laid back, and even possibly fun approach to teaching science?



#2 DrKrettin

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 07:52 AM

Considering the amount of woo crap posted, your Wizard of Oz post was positively scientific. Why did somebody object? 



#3 Farming guy

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 08:35 AM

It was proclaimed a "waste of time"  It could be that my sense of humor just left a bitter feeling .(note my post about jokes being dangerous).  

 

On the subject of fiction in science education, I recall a college engineering class with a textbook problem with Superman getting shot, and we had to calculate the energy he absorbed from having the bullets bounce off of him.  



#4 exchemist

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 09:15 AM

I recently annoyed someone with a post about the Wizard of Oz.  Although I was trying to provide some levity, there was an actual chemistry question there.

 

Is there no room in education for that sort of laid back, and even possibly fun approach to teaching science?

Who says there is no one in chemistry with a sense of humour? : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arsole   :)

 

It's even ring-shaped......


Edited by exchemist, 23 March 2017 - 09:16 AM.


#5 CraigD

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 12:13 AM

Who says there is no one in chemistry with a sense of humour? : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arsole :)

Arsoles are aromatic. Add a CH to an arsole and it becomes arsinine. :D

I don’t think any comedic creativity is involved, though, as these funny names come from just applying standard nomenclature rules when adding a bit of arsenic to a benzene ring.

#6 exchemist

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 02:45 AM

Arsoles are aromatic. Add a CH to an arsole and it becomes arsinine. :D

I don’t think any comedic creativity is involved, though, as these funny names come from just applying standard nomenclature rules when adding a bit of arsenic to a benzene ring.

Yes I know. I was, er, yer know, joking. :)

 

This is an interesting molecule. Evidently there is enough p-orbital overlap to give some pi-bonding (very slightly shorter bond length than C-As single bond) and some aromatic properties (e.g. ring current),  in spite of the large size of a 4p orbital compared to the 2p ones on carbon. But as the Diels-Alder reaction shows, it is a sort of halfway house.

 

I don't understand the conflicting information about its boiling point. It is described as both a liquid and a gas and the BP data gives a range. It is said that it decomposes on heating, but at what temperature and to give what products is not explained.


Edited by exchemist, 24 March 2017 - 02:45 AM.


#7 Farming guy

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 04:05 PM

I just came across a joke today. " How do tell a chemist from a plumber?  Ask him (or her) to pronounce 'unionized'."


Edited by Farming guy, 25 March 2017 - 05:07 PM.


#8 rumobrit111

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:12 AM

I just came across a joke today. " How do tell a chemist from a plumber?  Ask him (or her) to pronounce 'unionized'."

lol



#9 hazelm

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Posted 20 August 2017 - 09:16 AM

There seem to be people who truly do not comprehend humor.  Apparently those genes never developed.  It's a serious handicap -- for the rest of us who want to share.  :irked:



#10 wiseshopper

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 01:28 AM

It's actually nice to incorporate science in fiction sometimes. Since science needs visuals and imaginations to portray the theories and laws, learning it through fiction will definitely be a helpful avenue. It also takes away the boredom into learning the concepts.



#11 hazelm

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 06:17 AM

Fact:  I learned a lot of science from reading science fiction.  Sensible SF, I must add.  Ben Bova, Greg Bear, Asimov and on and on and on.  Just skip the monsters and read the good stuff.   Moreover most learning is better when taught with humor and fun.  Don't let the brow-beaters get to you.  Enjoy.  And share all your good jokes with us.


Edited by hazelm, 30 July 2018 - 06:18 AM.