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Are Spectacles An Efficiency Multiplier ?


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#1 petrushkagoogol

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 10:24 PM

Consider the act of reading a book with myopic eyesight (i.e. wearing spectacles) and reading it correctly.
 
Here the sensors (eyes) are working at less than 100% but the reading efficiency is as good as any normal person.
 
Hence you are getting optimum results with less than optimum sensors.
 
This means that overall efficiency is greater than 100%.
 
Is there more to this than meets the eye (both literally and figuratively)  ?  :innocent:
 


#2 CraigD

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 02:46 PM

The only results of a Google search for “efficiency multiplier” I found referred to features in video games. I’ve never heard it applied to medicine or physiology. Can you provide a link or reference to the use of the concept of efficiency, efficiency multipliers, or what you call “overall efficiency” in these disciplines?

From what I’ve been able to quickly gather, “reading efficiency” is a concept used mostly by educators to measure reading ability. For example, this commercial educational materials publisher webpage describes a standardized test of reading efficiency:

The Test of Word Reading Efficiency–Second Edition (TOWRE–2) is a measure of an individual’s ability to pronounce printed words (Sight Word Efficiency) and phonemically regular nonwords (Phonemic Decoding Efficiency) accurately and fluently. Because it can be administered very quickly, the test provides an efficient means of monitoring the growth of two kinds of word reading skill that are critical in the development of overall reading ability.


Some training services appear to apply the concept to adults, especially white collar workers. For example, this business marketing company webpage gives the following definition:

I would like to define efficient reading as the extraction of information and meaning from a letter, memo, paper, report, or book as rapidly and completely as possible.


Other than the need to correct vision defects to assure that children and adults are able to read adequately, I’ve not seen anything like what you’re talking about. Do you have any links or reference explaining what you’re talking about, or supporting any of your claims?

#3 petrushkagoogol

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 08:45 AM

The only results of a Google search for “efficiency multiplier” I found referred to features in video games. I’ve never heard it applied to medicine or physiology. Can you provide a link or reference to the use of the concept of efficiency, efficiency multipliers, or what you call “overall efficiency” in these disciplines?

From what I’ve been able to quickly gather, “reading efficiency” is a concept used mostly by educators to measure reading ability. For example, this commercial educational materials publisher webpage describes a standardized test of reading efficiency:

The Test of Word Reading Efficiency–Second Edition (TOWRE–2) is a measure of an individual’s ability to pronounce printed words (Sight Word Efficiency) and phonemically regular nonwords (Phonemic Decoding Efficiency) accurately and fluently. Because it can be administered very quickly, the test provides an efficient means of monitoring the growth of two kinds of word reading skill that are critical in the development of overall reading ability.


Some training services appear to apply the concept to adults, especially white collar workers. For example, this business marketing company webpage gives the following definition:

I would like to define efficient reading as the extraction of information and meaning from a letter, memo, paper, report, or book as rapidly and completely as possible.


Other than the need to correct vision defects to assure that children and adults are able to read adequately, I’ve not seen anything like what you’re talking about. Do you have any links or reference explaining what you’re talking about, or supporting any of your claims?

 

 

What I am saying is if you can read a book with the same efficiency if you are visually impaired as when you are not, that means you are using your "hardware" at a performance level that would seemingly be prohibited if events took their normal course,,,,,



#4 fahrquad

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Posted 15 November 2016 - 04:16 AM

I am myopic and have been for about 50 years.  I can read better without my glasses than I can with them.  I take my glasses off when I am on the computer (like right now).  I have bifocals that cancel the correction from the distance lenses, but I rarely wear them.  I can just flip up or take off my glasses to read close up.  Regarding the original post, I can read a book just fine without my glasses.  12-24 inches works for me.  BTW, my optic cells are working just as well as a person with 20x20 vision.  The image projected on the retinas is just not in focus.  Imagine looking through a telescope or microscope that is out of focus


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