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What Is The Link Between Atoms And Metaphors?

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#1 Mariel33

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 09:28 AM

Where exactly does metaphor derive from?



#2 CraigD

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 02:44 PM

Since metaphor is a feature of language, I’d say is arises from entities that are capable of using metaphor-containing language.

Metaphor appears to play a critical role in the human mind, not just when its used in language, but even in the thoughts of people who don’t understand the concept of metaphor. A lot’s been written on this subject – one of my favorite writers on it is George Lakoff, who’s written such obviously-titled works on it as his 1980 Metaphors We Live By, and has been a major influence among linguists, psychologists, and philosophers.

I find the question of whether the used of metaphor is unique to humans an interesting one. I think some non-human animals use it – for example, Koko, a female gorilla who was taught American Sign Language, named her pet kittens such things as “All Ball”, and “Lipstick”, which seems metaphorical to me, as she clearly understood that these animals were living things, not balls or lipstick, so was using these words metaphorically.

I’m also very interested in writing computer programs that use metaphor, though I’ve not done so, and don’t think anybody yet has. I think that a program that could do so would be a true strong artificial intelligence.

As far as the title question about a link between atoms and metaphor, I don’t think atoms are more strongly linked to metaphor than they are to any physical phenomena. I find the question not very useful, and worse, a distraction.

#3 Mariel33

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 03:05 PM

Since metaphor is a feature of language, I’d say is arises from entities that are capable of using metaphor-containing language.

Metaphor appears to play a critical role in the human mind, not just when its used in language, but even in the thoughts of people who don’t understand the concept of metaphor. A lot’s been written on this subject – one of my favorite writers on it is George Lakoff, who’s written such obviously-titled works on it as his 1980 Metaphors We Live By, and has been a major influence among linguists, psychologists, and philosophers.

I find the question of whether the used of metaphor is unique to humans an interesting one. I think some non-human animals use it – for example, Koko, a female gorilla who was taught American Sign Language, named her pet kittens such things as “All Ball”, and “Lipstick”, which seems metaphorical to me, as she clearly understood that these animals were living things, not balls or lipstick, so was using these words metaphorically.

I’m also very interested in writing computer programs that use metaphor, though I’ve not done so, and don’t think anybody yet has. I think that a program that could do so would be a true strong artificial intelligence.

As far as the title question about a link between atoms and metaphor, I don’t think atoms are more strongly linked to metaphor than they are to any physical phenomena. I find the question not very useful, and worse, a distraction.

I'm of the position that if metaphors are an intended difference, this suggests that atoms aren't real. The source of the intended difference is not intended difference, making it difference that isn't meant to exist.

Metaphors are post-not intended difference, meaning that they can be the identity of a duplicate of reality's source.



#4 A-wal

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 03:30 PM

I'm of the position that if metaphors are an intended difference, this suggests that atoms aren't real. The source of the intended difference is not intended difference, making it difference that isn't meant to exist.

Metaphors are post-not intended difference, meaning that they can be the identity of a duplicate of reality's source.

:huh: Definitely high, as a kite, with a very long string, on an extremely windy day.


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#5 fahrquad

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 09:22 PM

I'm of the position that if metaphors are an intended difference, this suggests that atoms aren't real. The source of the intended difference is not intended difference, making it difference that isn't meant to exist.

Metaphors are post-not intended difference, meaning that they can be the identity of a duplicate of reality's source.

?????  Exactly what planet are you on?



#6 Mariel33

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 05:26 AM

?????  Exactly what planet are you on?

I think that metaphors are God's communication, but at the price of conflation; metaphors need no knowledge of God, but are a means to God perhaps.  

What do you think about metaphors?



#7 exchemist

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 08:32 AM

I think that metaphors are God's communication, but at the price of conflation; metaphors need no knowledge of God, but are a means to God perhaps.  

What do you think about metaphors?

 

I think they are a figure of human speech, like similes and other figures of speech: https://en.wikipedia...igure_of_speech



#8 Mariel33

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 08:55 AM

I think they are a figure of human speech, like similes and other figures of speech: https://en.wikipedia...igure_of_speech

Can science exist without metaphors?



#9 exchemist

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 09:26 AM

Can science exist without metaphors?

Yes. I do not think metaphor forms part of science.

 

However simile is another matter, given that what we do in science is construct models of physical reality. These claim to be like reality, without necessarily being identical with it. 





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