Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Can People 500 Years Ago Write Reviews For Modern Movies?

Technology Movies History Science Metaphysics

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Mariel33

Mariel33

    Questioning

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 115 posts

Posted 02 October 2016 - 08:41 AM

Is it possible, that anyone who lived 1,000 years ago will be able to write movie reviews in the future? Take a film like Guilty as Sin, or Halloween 6, or contemporary films like The Force Awakens - in the future, can these movies be reviewed by participants of the American civil war, or the citizens of ancient Rome? 



#2 A-wal

A-wal

    Creating

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1316 posts

Posted 02 October 2016 - 11:35 AM

You high?


  • exchemist likes this

#3 fahrquad

fahrquad

    All I know is that I know nothing.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1209 posts

Posted 03 October 2016 - 12:26 AM

Is it possible, that anyone who lived 1,000 years ago will be able to write movie reviews in the future? Take a film like Guilty as Sin, or Halloween 6, or contemporary films like The Force Awakens - in the future, can these movies be reviewed by participants of the American civil war, or the citizens of ancient Rome? 

Ummm...no.  There would need to be time travel involved, and as we all know time flows in one direction only, otherwise time travelers would be among us now, or at least at the significant historical events.


Edited by fahrquad, 03 October 2016 - 12:27 AM.


#4 fahrquad

fahrquad

    All I know is that I know nothing.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1209 posts

Posted 03 October 2016 - 12:46 AM

I travel through time...one day at a time, and have done so for nearly 56 years.



#5 fahrquad

fahrquad

    All I know is that I know nothing.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1209 posts

Posted 03 October 2016 - 12:52 AM

Is it possible, that anyone who lived 1,000 years ago will be able to write movie reviews in the future? Take a film like Guilty as Sin, or Halloween 6, or contemporary films like The Force Awakens - in the future, can these movies be reviewed by participants of the American civil war, or the citizens of ancient Rome? 

I would also point out that there are significant differences in the English language over the last 151 years, and no one speaks Latin anymore except Roman Catholic clergy and a few others.


Edited by fahrquad, 03 October 2016 - 12:58 AM.


#6 fahrquad

fahrquad

    All I know is that I know nothing.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1209 posts

Posted 03 October 2016 - 01:05 AM

Suspending all rational disbelief and logic, someone from the past could not comprehend the context nor the meaning of a modern film since all of the social and cultural norms would be so alien from what they are accustomed to.  On a side note, who screens these posts?  I have seen many idiotic posts here that could have been made by toddlers, this one included.



#7 Mariel33

Mariel33

    Questioning

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 115 posts

Posted 03 October 2016 - 09:45 AM

Suspending all rational disbelief and logic, someone from the past could not comprehend the context nor the meaning of a modern film since all of the social and cultural norms would be so alien from what they are accustomed to.  On a side note, who screens these posts?  I have seen many idiotic posts here that could have been made by toddlers, this one included.

Both the Roman empire and the US are the reality of political systems, and art; I think if someone from the former society watched Halloween 6, they'd still be inspired by the movie's symbolism.



#8 CraigD

CraigD

    Creating

  • Administrators
  • 8034 posts

Posted 03 October 2016 - 02:13 PM

Is it possible, that anyone who lived 1,000 years ago will be able to write movie reviews in the future?

According to a strict definition of personal identity, since nobody who lived 1000 years ago is still alive so is not able to write anything, I have to agree with A-wal and Fahrquad, and answer “no” – and join A-Wal in asking

You high?


If we loosen the definition of identity, ideas like Tipler’s Omega point and the simulation hypothesis, which hold that a computer simulation of a person is essentially the same as that person, and that in the future, it will be possible to accurately simulate long dead people, that many or all past people will be simulated, and that further, many or nearly all possible histories will be simulated, we’d be forced to answer “yes”.

The simulation hypothesis takes this a further, very weird step, in saying that not only will many or most possible histories be simulate in the far future, but that the reality we are all experiencing is such a simulation.

#9 Mariel33

Mariel33

    Questioning

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 115 posts

Posted 03 October 2016 - 02:24 PM

According to a strict definition of personal identity, since nobody who lived 1000 years ago is still alive so is not able to write anything, I have to agree with A-wal and Fahrquad, and answer “no” – and join A-Wal in asking

If we loosen the definition of identity, ideas like Tipler’s Omega point and the simulation hypothesis, which hold that a computer simulation of a person is essentially the same as that person, and that in the future, it will be possible to accurately simulate long dead people, that many or all past people will be simulated, and that further, many or nearly all possible histories will be simulated, we’d be forced to answer “yes”.

The simulation hypothesis takes this a further, very weird step, in saying that not only will many or most possible histories be simulate in the far future, but that the reality we are all experiencing is such a simulation.

 

Naturally, I accept the point about simulation. However, I think the future will not need simulation, because science will allow all deceased beings to be resurrected.

In essence, I believe in the principle of no duplication; the idea that an identity should exist that isn't duplicated, but that the means to that goal is to reflect reality. 

The example I used, Halloween 6, is a great film (arguably the greatest film ever made), only it makes me wonder if it's fair that my experiences with the film are meant to be reflected onto people who lived as far as 1,000 years ago.  


Edited by Mariel33, 04 October 2016 - 05:43 AM.




Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Technology, Movies, History, Science, Metaphysics