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Most Dangerous Sharks

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Poll: Most Dangerous Shark? (5 member(s) have cast votes)

Most Dangerous Shark?

  1. Bull Shark (3 votes [60.00%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 60.00%

  2. Tiger Shark (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  3. Mako Fin Shark (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  4. Hammerhead Shark (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. Great White Shark (2 votes [40.00%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 40.00%

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#1 besttop5

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 10:43 PM

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What are some more of the most dangerous sharks there are?



#2 Buffy

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 11:01 PM

Welcome to Hypography BestTop5!

 

We're all about discussion and frown upon hit and run advertising, so your link was removed, but it's an interesting topic! What do you think the different qualities and attributes of sharks are that make them dangerous?

 

 

Don’t rub noses with a shark. It may be the last dental appointment you ever have, :phones:

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#3 LaurieAG

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 01:24 AM

What do you think the different qualities and attributes of sharks are that make them dangerous?

 

The hungry ones with sharp teeth?



#4 pgrmdave

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 09:56 AM

Probably, like most animals, the most dangerous ones are the ones that are most comfortable around people.



#5 Buffy

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 01:50 PM

The hungry ones with sharp teeth?

 

That's pretty much all of them except for the Whale Shark...who's hungry and has teeth but doesn't actually use them.

 

 

Man, of all the animals, is probably the only one to regard himself as a great delicacy, :phones:
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#6 Moontanman

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Posted 11 September 2015 - 06:15 AM

Most Sharks are harmless under most conditions, the bull shark, tiger shark, and great white being exceptions to this.

#7 fahrquad

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Posted 20 December 2015 - 04:38 PM

Lets not forget the Basking Shark and the Megamouth Shark.  Nurse Sharks are relatively harmless too unless cornered and then they will bite.

 

(Community does no allow posting images from Wikipedia for some reason)


Edited by fahrquad, 20 December 2015 - 09:38 PM.


#8 fahrquad

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Posted 20 December 2015 - 09:57 PM

I voted for the Bull or Zambezi Shark.  They are very tolerant of fresh water and have been reported as far up the Mississippi River as Illinois.

 

The bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas), also known as the Zambezi shark or, unofficially, as Zambi in Africa and Nicaragua shark in Nicaragua, is a requiem shark commonly found worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers. The bull shark is known for its aggressive nature, predilection for warm shallow water, and presence in brackish and freshwater systems including estuaries and rivers.

Bull sharks can thrive in both saltwater and freshwater and can travel far up rivers. They have even been known to travel as far up as the Mississippi River in Illinois,[2] although there have been few recorded freshwater human-shark interactions. They are probably responsible for the majority of near-shore shark attacks, including many bites attributed to other species.[3]

Unlike the river sharks of the genus Glyphis, bull sharks are not true freshwater sharks, despite their ability to survive in freshwater habitats.

 

https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Bull_shark



#9 fahrquad

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Posted 20 December 2015 - 10:08 PM

Many attacks attributed to River Sharks, the only 3 species of true freshwater sharks, are actually Bull Shark attacks.  River Sharks are fish eaters based on their teeth.

 

https://en.wikipedia...iki/River_shark



#10 Moontanman

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Posted 22 December 2015 - 01:07 PM

I voted for the Bull or Zambezi Shark.  They are very tolerant of fresh water and have been reported as far up the Mississippi River as Illinois.

 

The bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas), also known as the Zambezi shark or, unofficially, as Zambi in Africa and Nicaragua shark in Nicaragua, is a requiem shark commonly found worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers. The bull shark is known for its aggressive nature, predilection for warm shallow water, and presence in brackish and freshwater systems including estuaries and rivers.

Bull sharks can thrive in both saltwater and freshwater and can travel far up rivers. They have even been known to travel as far up as the Mississippi River in Illinois,[2] although there have been few recorded freshwater human-shark interactions. They are probably responsible for the majority of near-shore shark attacks, including many bites attributed to other species.[3]

Unlike the river sharks of the genus Glyphis, bull sharks are not true freshwater sharks, despite their ability to survive in freshwater habitats.

 

https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Bull_shark

 

Here in Wilmington, NC where I live there have been reports of sharks in the small streams in the middle of the city! 



#11 fahrquad

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Posted 22 December 2015 - 10:56 PM

Howdy neighbor!  I am in Simpsonville, South Carolina (Greenville County).  There were several shark attacks around Folly Beach (Charleston County) this past summer that were attributed to Black Tip Sharks, but were most likely Bull Sharks.


Edited by fahrquad, 22 December 2015 - 10:59 PM.


#12 Moontanman

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Posted 23 December 2015 - 12:31 PM

Howdy neighbor!  I am in Simpsonville, South Carolina (Greenville County).  There were several shark attacks around Folly Beach (Charleston County) this past summer that were attributed to Black Tip Sharks, but were most likely Bull Sharks.

 

Black tips are quite common here as well but they are fish eaters, I've had them swim by me while diving many times, bullsharks are not that common here, I've never caught one or heard of anyone catching one but the shark in the middle of the city pretty much had to be a bullshark. 



#13 fahrquad

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Posted 28 December 2015 - 01:59 PM

Bull Sharks can't make it this far inland (Greenville, SC) because of the numerous dams without locks) in the way.  Black Tip Sharks, Skates, and Stingrays are common catches around the fishing pier at Folly Beach (Charleston County), but fisherman are prohibited from keeping any sharks no matter how big or small (most caught are dogfish).  Despite human fears about sharks, they are for the most part endangered creatures that are a vital part of the oceanic environment, and are deserving of being protected from US (i.e. Humanity, not the USA).



#14 fahrquad

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Posted 28 December 2015 - 02:11 PM

While at the John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park in Key Largo a few years ago, I was annoying a school of about 40 Barracuda while trying to get a good picture.  They were only about 14-16 inches long, unlike the head of the Great Barracuda I found on the beach at the Bahamian Island of Eleuthera, which looked like it was in the 6-7 foot range (Paponi Beach)(down the road next to Margaret's Cemetery).





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