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Poll: How often do you fly a kite? (13 member(s) have cast votes)

How often do you fly a kite?

  1. I never fly a kite (2 votes [7.14%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.14%

  2. I fly a kite once every 100 years (1 votes [3.57%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.57%

  3. I fly a kite once every 60 years (1 votes [3.57%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.57%

  4. I fly a kite once every 40 years (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. I fly a kite once every 20 years (3 votes [10.71%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.71%

  6. I fly a kite once every 10 years (11 votes [39.29%])

    Percentage of vote: 39.29%

  7. I fly a kite once every year (6 votes [21.43%])

    Percentage of vote: 21.43%

  8. I fly a kite once every month (4 votes [14.29%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.29%

  9. I fly a kite once every week (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  10. I fly a kite once every day (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

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#647 Turtle

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 06:05 PM

Okaly dokaly folkaly. I sewed the 3 hems in one pentagon that enfold struts with no neighboring sails and then installed the stuts. (Red arrows in image point to edges that will be joined to triangular sail panesl.) Sehr gut! I can now proceed to cut the rest of the sails and continue the assembly. :circle:

 


Edited by Turtle, 27 September 2017 - 08:22 PM.


#648 Turtle

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 08:02 PM

I am somewhere between 'gracefully surrendering the things of youth'  and 'rage, rage against the dying of the light'. :goodbad:  I suppose I am satisfied but not happy, or the reverse. Yada yada yada, 2 panels to show for myself. :turtle:


Edited by Turtle, 27 September 2017 - 08:23 PM.


#649 Turtle

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 08:47 AM

Making haste slowly. :turtle: I am unhappy that the factory crease in the fabric won't iron out, as well as incidental creases/wrinkles resulting from the fabric being folded after it was cut. I suppose these won't matter as far as how it looks in the sky or how it flies, but it bugs me all the same. :rant:



#650 Turtle

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 04:22 PM

So I finished the front-bottom sail(s) and test-fitted it/them with struts. :thumbs_up The pentagonal sails stabilize the frame inasmuch as it is confines each vertex angle in the frame to 108˚, however the sailed pentagons are still free to fold. :goodbad: I then assembled the rest of the bottom half. In spite of the stiffening effect of the sail(s), it is still a flopsy-mopsy assemblage. I am leaning to the opinion that I will need tensioning lines radiating from the center to all 30 vetices in order to lock down the frame. Time will tell... :turtle: :hi:



 


Edited by Turtle, 27 September 2017 - 08:23 PM.


#651 LaurieAG

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 01:39 AM

In spite of the stiffening effect of the sail(s), it is still a flopsy-mopsy assemblage. I am leaning to the opinion that I will need tensioning lines radiating from the center to all 30 vetices in order to lock down the frame. Time will tell... :turtle: :hi:

 

At the worst Turtle, if it doesn't tighten up from the inside you could add a light weight circle/ring around the outside of the 5 points of each hexagon to stiffen things up in that plane, but doing this also makes the whole kite heavier.

 

Hmm looking at things in a slightly different way, you could just create 12 circles (icosidodecahedron), cover them and join them together so that the connections between them create the triangles without any extra weight. The surface area of each 'side' goes from being the area of a pentagon within a circle to the area of the circle itself so you'd get a larger total surface area over all 12 sides, without including any other triangles. You just put cloth over each circle and leave reinforced holes at 5 equal points around the circumference so that you can just use zip ties to connect all 12 circular panels together, semi permanently, without using one triangular filler panel. ;)



#652 Turtle

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 01:13 PM

At the worst Turtle, if it doesn't tighten up from the inside you could add a light weight circle/ring around the outside of the 5 points of each hexagon to stiffen things up in that plane, but doing this also makes the whole kite heavier.
 
Hmm looking at things in a slightly different way, you could just create 12 circles (icosidodecahedron), cover them and join them together so that the connections between them create the triangles without any extra weight. The surface area of each 'side' goes from being the area of a pentagon within a circle to the area of the circle itself so you'd get a larger total surface area over all 12 sides, without including any other triangles. You just put cloth over each circle and leave reinforced holes at 5 equal points around the circumference so that you can just use zip ties to connect all 12 circular panels together, semi permanently, without using one triangular filler panel. ;)

I meant to call you out in the last post for your thoughts and ideas. Reading my mind again!?

So those are interesting ideas for variations on the frame! Alas, the kites I have seen with circle & arc frames all use carbon rods and those are not in my budget.

Besides cost, my 'big idea' here has been to have the frame be the edges of either a Platonic solid or an Archimedian solid. One possible method to forestall the floppiness in some of the forms would be to make my connectors rigid by using aluminum tubing. The problem here is again cost, as well as the difficulty (that I perceive) in bending the connectors to the correct angles.

While trussing up the new kite is challenging -if not daunting- I will persevere. I know it works from the Flymaxion™, so seems reasonable to think it will work again. I was thinking maybe starting with fixed-length lines for a mockup, and maybe for the final if it works well.

On the sliding adjusters, small buttons were suggested to me rather than the metal washers. Will report back on that in a turtle's rush. :turtle:

I took the kites to the beach again and successfully flew the Flyoctadron™. It urns out to be an 'active' flyer, by which I mean that in a steady wind it flies steady, but if the wind gusts or you tug the line a'sudden the kite rolls and dives and darts about. After a few crashes, I figured out that I could recover from dives by slacking the line with a step forward or extending my arm. I only had 50' of line, but I could tell this kite will take whatever line you give it.

So yeah, Flyoctadron™ is a great active flyer. :woohoo: :hi:

 


Edited by Turtle, 27 September 2017 - 08:24 PM.


#653 Turtle

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 01:22 PM

PS On your rings idea Laurie, it prompted me to recall seeing this kite:
EO6 Cellular Box Kite

The Prism EO6 (Expandable Object) kite series is the original brainchild of Phil McConnachie, internationally renowned kite designer from Australia. His EO6 is a dynamic box kite with 6 intersecting elliptical planes that fly stable or as marvelous tumblers. ...
ProductImage.ckimg_-300x300.jpg


Seeing the word 'tumblers' also prompted me to recall that a fella at the beach said the Flyoctadron™ looked like a 'tumbling box'. So it appears there is a class of kites that behave as the Flyoctadron™. Bob's yer Uncle! :hal_skeleton:



#654 Turtle

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 06:47 PM

Interjectory musings...
 
The Wiki page on the icosidodecahedron says,

... An icosidodecahedron can be split along any of six planes to form a pair of pentagonal rotundae, which belong among the Johnson solids.
The icosidodecahedron can be considered a pentagonal gyrobirotunda, as a combination of two rotundae (compare pentagonal orthobirotunda, one of the Johnson solids). In this form its symmetry is D5d, [10,2+], (2*5), order 20.
The wire-frame figure of the icosidodecahedron consists of six flat regular decagons, meeting in pairs at each of the 30 vertices.
The icosidodecahedron has 6 central decagons. Projected into a sphere, they define 6 great circles. Buckminster Fuller used these 6 great circles, along with 15 and 10 others in two other polyhedra to define his 31 great circles of the spherical icosahedron.
...


Perhaps the optimum harnessing follows these great circles. :ideamaybenot: :circle:

Meantime on building a preset harness, I find at icosidodecahedron @ Wolfram MathWorld, that the distance from a vertex to center is Phi*edge length.
 

circumradius R of the solid for a=1
R = phi, approx 1.61803.

1.61803*23"=37.21" tensioning lines.

Off to read Synergetics for what illuming Bucky may provide on said great circles of polyhedra. :candle: :read:

#655 Turtle

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 01:42 PM

...
Off to read Synergetics for what illuming Bucky may provide on said great circles of polyhedra. :candle: :read:

So yeah, the candle says it all. I need a spotlight in a storm and I get a candle in a closet. Oh that someone had got you out with a kite Bucky! :jab: Best regards as ever as it is. :lol:

That the rest of ye may judge: Synergetics: Explorations in the Geometry of Thinking
 

...
1132.01 This omnidirectional, convergent-divergent, systems-reporting device can print out the most-economical-interrelationships trackings and information-coordinating routings of all systems, because it embraces the pattern of all 87 of the most economical and only available great-circle railroad tracks and no-loss-holding stations of energetic Universe; i.e., through all the closest-sphere-packed systems; i.e., through all the isotropic vector matrixes. In other words, if you want to go from here to there in Universe in the quickest and most economical way, while stopping over here and there for indefinite periods at no-extra-cost hotels, you have got to go through the 12 points of intertangency of the 25 great circles of fundamental symmetry that apply to all the atoms and their association in all seven of the fundamental symmetry subsets.
1132.02 The 31 great circles of the icosahedron always shunt the energies into local- holding great-circle orbits, while the vector equilibrium opens the switching to omniuniverse energy travel. The icosahedron is red light, holding, no-go; whereas vector equilibrium is green light, go. The six great circles of the icosahedron act as holding patterns for energies. The 25 great circles of the vector equilibrium all go through the 12 tangential contact points bridging between the 12 atomic spheres always closest packed around any one spherical atom domain. ...

:hi:

#656 Turtle

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 12:09 AM

The Flycosidodecadron™ is an Epicosi Failadron™. No amount of interior tensioning lines will put Humpty together. More sticks might fix things, but then there goes the good wail let alone no more icosidodecahedral frame. See for yourself... ain't...gonna...fly... :flying: 



Onward and -hopefully- upward! I may be able to fly a single sail/wing by re-sticking and tensioning in back. Initial estimates put the wail @ 24.8. Encouraging!

Meantime, working up plans for some compound Flyoctadrons™. Better wail because some sticks can be eliminated at the joins while sail area remains unchanged. Bigger!! Increased stability? :ideamaybenot:


Edited by Turtle, 20 October 2017 - 02:27 PM.


#657 Turtle

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 02:07 PM

Another kite designed and built, but I won't be showing it 'til I can test it out. Could be a while as trips to the coast are few and far between for me. Also have yet another design under construction for which I will just hint it is something of an outside-in job.

Mostly just posting because I noticed the noise here dropped back while I was propounding on kites. Noise sucks, but kites blow. :fan: :hi:

#658 Turtle

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 02:21 PM

Some eye-candy I spotted on one of my beach trips. :1drink: 
36638989832_b3fa74bbfe.jpg