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Poll: How often do you fly a kite? (10 member(s) have cast votes)

How often do you fly a kite?

  1. I never fly a kite (1 votes [4.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.00%

  2. I fly a kite once every 100 years (1 votes [4.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.00%

  3. I fly a kite once every 60 years (1 votes [4.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.00%

  4. I fly a kite once every 40 years (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. I fly a kite once every 20 years (3 votes [12.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.00%

  6. I fly a kite once every 10 years (9 votes [36.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 36.00%

  7. I fly a kite once every year (6 votes [24.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 24.00%

  8. I fly a kite once every month (4 votes [16.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 16.00%

  9. I fly a kite once every week (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  10. I fly a kite once every day (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

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#579 Turtle

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 01:35 PM

An update photo and a revisit of your comment Laurie. If you think about 'standard' box kites, they too have 2 pairs of parallel square sides at angles to each other. :good:

 

Probably a couple more days before any test flying. :fluffy:

 

On a revisit of my revisit, my design has 6 pairs of parallel square sides. 4 of them are oriented as a 'standard' box kite in my proposed bridling, (albeit on point/vertex and not on edge) but 2 of them, i.e. the top & bottom appear to be oriented such that the wind will push down on them. Not good. :nono: I'm thinking I may have to remove the sails from these squares at least, but possibly I can add sails to a couple of the triangular faces that have lifting orientations. Ain't gedanken grand!? No substitute for rubber on the road however, which is even more granderdanken. :bounce:  :slingshot:

 

I wonder if an icosahedron can fly? Dodecahedron? :ideamaybenot:



#580 hazelm

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 01:40 PM

Who would ever have thought flying a kite could be so complicated?  And here we are always telling someone to "Go fly a kite".   :nahnahbooboo:


Edited by hazelm, 23 July 2017 - 01:41 PM.


#581 Turtle

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 07:34 PM

Who would ever have thought flying a kite could be so complicated?  And here we are always telling someone to "Go fly a kite".   :nahnahbooboo:

The more I learn, the more I learn. :lol: From a simple dime-store delta to power generating giants, kiting is a fascinating topic for all. Those who would disagree can go pound sand down a rat hole. :P



#582 hazelm

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 04:13 AM

I was fascinated by your picture of a box kite.  Or I think that was the picture.  I would never have dreamed that.  And it flies!  Of course, they said the Wright brothers' "kite"  (plane) wouldn't fly but it did.  Never say never.   Can't make the Smiley work this morning.  So, <G>



#583 Turtle

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 12:28 PM

I was fascinated by your picture of a box kite.  Or I think that was the picture.  I would never have dreamed that.  And it flies!  Of course, they said the Wright brothers' "kite"  (plane) wouldn't fly but it did.  Never say never.   Can't make the Smiley work this morning.  So, <G>

 

I'm not sure which picture you think, but there sure are a lot of kites out there that one wouldn't imagine would fly. If by chance you are thinking of the cuboctahedron prototype I am building, I haven't yet finished it so I don't know if it flies or not. I hope to be gluing up the final side today and then I will be adding some reinforcement gussets to the joints and attaching a bridle. It will be at least a couple more days, wind allowing, before I can give it a try.

 

I will make and post videos of my test flights, win or lose. In any case, I count it a win to have piqued your interest and thanks for posting. :partycheers:



#584 hazelm

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 01:09 PM

It was the one where you posted the following in reply to Laurie's comment that a kite you'd made or planned might not fly.  It was on a desk.  You wrote:

 

An update photo and a revisit of your comment Laurie. If you think about 'standard' box kites, they too have 2 pairs of parallel square sides at angles to each other. :good:

 

Probably a couple more days before any test flying. :fluffy:



#585 Turtle

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 02:36 PM

It was the one where you posted the following in reply to Laurie's comment that a kite you'd made or planned might not fly.  It was on a desk.  You wrote:
 
An update photo and a revisit of your comment Laurie. If you think about 'standard' box kites, they too have 2 pairs of parallel square sides at angles to each other. :good:
 
Probably a couple more days before any test flying. :fluffy:

Acknowledged. That's the cuboctahedron, which I called the Flymaxion™ and the work is still in progress; stay tuned. (Unfortunately I am a bit clumsy and just broke a strut and tore a sail so now have to allow additional time for repairs.)
As for my envisioning it, I admit to unusual perspectives on mathy and engineering things. While this does not always bear fruit, it has often enough that I am not put off making dreamy propositions, proposals, and conjectures that cross my careenium. :D

PS Here's a new photo of current stage. Tear and broken stick at upper left corner. The tear is OK because that sail can be one of the two I remove, and I can glue and splint the broken stick. Forward and upward! :piratesword:

35751438380_5510513c19_z.jpg

Edited by Turtle, 24 July 2017 - 06:34 PM.


#586 hazelm

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 03:07 PM

Ah, so that isn't the box kite.  Seen from a different angle, I get a totally different perspective.  Thanks.  hazelm



#587 Turtle

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 03:45 PM

Ah, so that isn't the box kite.  Seen from a different angle, I get a totally different perspective.  Thanks.  hazelm

Well, it is the same kite pictured in the post (#578) that you quoted me from, just further along in construction.

Here I will give some background so as to hopefully de-confusify things a bit. Box kites and my prototype cuboctahedron kite belong to a family of kites called cellular kites. Cellular kites are 3 dimensional geometric structures that can be made up of single or multiple geometric cells. The [usually termed] box kites have a cube as the basic cell with varying numbers of the 6 faces covered with sails. Sails can be made of fabric or paper. (Note that Conyne type kites are often referred to as 'triangular box kites')

Tetrahedral kites have been around a long time, and in fact Alexander Graham Bell built huge tetrahedral kites composed of thousands of individual sails. Here's a photo of a small example from Wiki:
200px-Early_design_of_a_Tetrahedron_kite

Here's one of Bell's giant tetrahedral kites: (Source)
1011679.jpg?323

Here's a reprint of an article by Bell in the National Geographic magazine of 1903:
The Tetrahedral Principle in Kite Structure

Now to add my dreamy twist, we can refer to the Platonic solids; the tetrahedron, the cube, the octahedron, the dodecahedron, and the icosahedron. Of these, I am only aware of the tetrahedron and cube being used as the cells for kites. The cuboctahedron is not a Platonic solid because the faces are not identical, but apparently Plato was aware of the cuboctahedron. While I did briefly speculate on the other Platonic solids as potential kite cells, I chose the cuboctahedron because Buckminster Fuller was enamored by it, calling it variously the 'dymaxion' and the 'vector equilibrium'.

I could go on....and on... :lol: Thanks again for prompting me. :hi:

#588 Turtle

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 10:28 PM

Okaly dokaly. I have repaired the broken strut and cut away 2 opposite square sails. Result pictured below. I have it sitting in more-or-less the orientation I think it will fly, with the wind coming from directly behind the viewer. The 2 brown dots on the ends of the center horizontal strut are where I will first try a  2-leg bridle. Also marked on the image with 3 green dots at each corner are the 2 triangular faces to which I may be adding sails. 1 triangular face is on the bottom in the front, the other is on the top in the back.

Visual illusions free. A gentle head bang may help with perception. :banghead:

Smoke 'em if ya got 'em. :esmoking:

 

35979309102_0d2a55aa23.jpg



#589 hazelm

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Posted Yesterday, 08:07 AM

Okaly dokaly. I have repaired the broken strut and cut away 2 opposite square sails. Result pictured below. I have it sitting in more-or-less the orientation I think it will fly, with the wind coming from directly behind the viewer. The 2 brown dots on the ends of the center horizontal strut are where I will first try a  2-leg bridle. Also marked on the image with 3 green dots at each corner are the 2 triangular faces to which I may be adding sails. 1 triangular face is on the bottom in the front, the other is on the top in the back.

Visual illusions free. A gentle head bang may help with perception. :banghead:

Smoke 'em if ya got 'em. :esmoking:

 

35979309102_0d2a55aa23.jpg

And it will fly despite all those "escape holes" in it because of the four "wings".  Forgive my terms.  I have a vivid imagination for naming things.

 

I never heard of a cuboctahedron but if Buckminster is for it I am for it.  Carry on while I play catchup here.  Hazel



#590 Turtle

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Posted Yesterday, 10:06 AM

And it will fly despite all those "escape holes" in it because of the four "wings".  Forgive my terms.  I have a vivid imagination for naming things.
 
I never heard of a cuboctahedron but if Buckminster is for it I am for it.  Carry on while I play catchup here.  Hazel

More that it will fly because of the 'holes' rather than in spite of them. Just as with flying your hand out a speeding car window, if you tip your hand down it will be pushed down, and tip your hand up and it's pushed up. I removed 2 of the sails because they were pointed down and would have pushed the kite down when considering the orientation I planned for the bridle. The 'holes' also allow the wind to reach the rear sails and add lift. The angle of the sails/wings to the wind is called in aeronautics, the 'angle of attack'.
 
The angle of attack for a kite is largely determined by the attachment point(s) of the bridle, and to a lesser degree by the geometry of the structure and per se the sails. There is a saying among kiters; 'you can fly a barn door if you bridle it right'.
 
So I just took the kite out for a short test and early indications are good! No wind, so I had to run with it a bit and it definitely rose. More testing and some video as conditions allow. :circle: :fan:
 
PS Fuller's endearment to the cuboctahedron stemmed from its unique geometry. (He shares your love of invented terms hazelm.) To whit to Whiki:
Cuboctahedron

Other names
●Heptaparallelohedron (Buckminster Fuller)
● Fuller applied the name "Dymaxion" to this shape, used in an early version of the Dymaxion map. He also called it the "Vector Equilibrium" because of its special symmetry (its center-to-vertex radius equals its edge length).
...
Geometric relations

The cuboctahedron is the unique convex polyhedron in which the long radius (center to vertex) is the same as the edge length; thus its long diameter (vertex to opposite vertex) is 2 edge lengths. This special symmetry is a property of only a few polytopes: the two-dimensional hexagon, the three-dimensional cuboctahedron, and the four-dimensional 24-cell and 8-cell (tesseract). ...


It is from Bucky's term 'dymaxion' that I formed my name for this kite, the Flymaxion™. :D

Edited by Turtle, Yesterday, 10:19 AM.


#591 Turtle

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Posted Yesterday, 10:46 AM

Short, but schweet!


#592 hazelm

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Posted Yesterday, 10:52 AM

It went up!  Good deal.  Thanks.

 

I wouldn't want to meet "Bob's uncle" in the dark.  Looks like the critter we found sleeping on our wall one morning.



#593 LaurieAG

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Posted Yesterday, 05:49 PM

Short, but schweet!

 

Looks good Turtle, I was wondering if it was going to fly or behave like a wind sock. :)



#594 Turtle

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Posted Yesterday, 07:29 PM

Looks good Turtle, I was wondering if it was going to fly or behave like a wind sock. :)

Thanks. :hi: You and me both. :whew: Wind today has been low with some occasional gustiness and I did manage to fly it on 4 ft. of thread a couple of times. When the wind picked up, it climbed and tugged so I am hopeful for good results with a steady wind, open space, and long line. On those occasions that it climbed today it did do some twisting and weaving side-to-side, but that may be the gusts and not a problem with the kite itself. Sorry no video; I encountered technical difficulties on that front. :doh:
 
Just to pass some time and in the vein of a flying windsock, here's a vid of flying my parachute from a few years ago. Such action on the Flymaxion would crush it like the balsa twigs & tissue that it is. :omg: :lol:
 


#595 Turtle

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Posted Yesterday, 10:02 PM

Did a little editing magic to illustrate a couple design variations.
Left-most shows how the kite will look if/when I cover two of the triangular faces; right-most one shows a 2-cell Flymaxion™ with no triangular faces sailed. That is all. :cup: 

35365075303_f61f1ca56b_n.jpg35365075253_1ebedea3f1_n.jpg