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Brainwave Manipulation


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#1 TINNY

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Posted 14 April 2005 - 08:16 PM

from the brainwave generator website - http://www.bwgen.com/

Meditation and relaxation capabilities of BrainWave Generator may help to get rid of some bad habits:

* Quit smoking
* Quit drinking
* Lose weight

This is because habits such as smoking and excessive drinking or eating are often unconscious ways to control one's feelings and moods, for example, to alleviate anxiety. This is especially true in the case of drinking, as alcohol changes one's state of mind quite noticeably and can create an illusion of relaxation.

I want to ask everyone's opinion on the effectiveness of binaural beats in helping a person achieve a desired state of mind, aka meditation. It seems too good to be true, yet is not popular and sounds pseudoscience.

#2 tarak

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Posted 28 April 2005 - 12:57 AM

More about brainwave manipulation
http://web-us.com/thescience.htm

#3 tarak

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Posted 28 April 2005 - 01:01 AM

Similarly I have heard about experiments where 500-1000watt music is played in the fields to increase the crop yield.

#4 tarak

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Posted 28 April 2005 - 01:10 AM

Science can't explain everything especially in biology and with respect to living systems,there is nothing like psuedo science as long as something works without a problem.
The more the story unravels the more exciting it becomes.There are many claims and questions which donot have answers with respect to medicine and alternative medicine.But ultimately it would be another kind of stimulant in another form,like a caffeine wave.

#5 TeleMad

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Posted 29 April 2005 - 08:25 PM

Binaural beats are auditory brainstem responses which originate in the superior olivary nucleus of each hemisphere. They result from the interaction of two different auditory impulses...


Another case of plagiarism. That comes from http://web-us.com/thescience.htm (and/or from a few other sites too).

#6 tarak

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Posted 30 April 2005 - 12:59 AM

Another case of plagiarism. That comes from http://web-us.com/thescience.htm (and/or from a few other sites too).

That post was not my explaination of binaural tests.Instead of giving the link I had pasted the definitions of the subject concerned.Anyway if it is against the rules of the game,I take it back.

#7 Turtle

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 11:47 AM

___I recall watching a show demonstrating brainwave manipulation using Helmholz(sp) resonance to generate a low frequency in the 2 to 10Hz range. The devices used to generate the Helmholz effect were megalithic structures at Malta & chambers in some Central & South American megaliths.
___The familar Helmholz resonace is experienced when blowing over the lip of a bottle; the higher tone is at the lip & the lower tone is that lip tone modified by the shape of the large closed vessel beneath. At Malta, the 'lip' is the opening to a long corridor that is roughly a meter or so square, & the 'vesse' is an expanded terminal room at the end of the corridor. In the experiment, a drummer making 2Hz at the entrance generated a subsonic Helmholz resonant frequency measured on instruments in the terminal chamber.
___These frequencys correspond to those measured in peoples brains who are in deep meditation.
___All very interesting investigations. My own device for experimenting with this is the Diable/Khua, or 'spinning disk on a string' (See thread of that name) Here is a mp3 link of my Khua:


#8 Mercedes Benzene

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 07:06 PM

Something I just learned about from the news (interestingly enough, within the same week, the news has talked about it, as has a radio station, and my school newspaper):
Binaural beats are being used to replicate sensations of being "high."

The company I-Doser offers tracks called "doses" which are named after illegal and legal drugs. They claim that they can replicate the experience of actually using such drugs.

I'm highly skeptical, and don't think it's possible to really replicate something like heroin or marijuana by using sounds, but countless testimony from users of i-doser say that the effects can be very dramatic (spacing out, extreme relaxation, strange muscle contractions, audio-visual hallucinations, etc).

I'm tempted to try it, but as mentioned, I'm highly skeptical. The software download comes with two free "doses" but the rest all cost money. Even if it does have some merit, I don't think I'd ever spend money on it.

#9 freeztar

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 03:40 AM

Something I just learned about from the news (interestingly enough, within the same week, the news has talked about it, as has a radio station, and my school newspaper):
Binaural beats are being used to replicate sensations of being "high."

The company I-Doser offers tracks called "doses" which are named after illegal and legal drugs. They claim that they can replicate the experience of actually using such drugs.

I'm highly skeptical, and don't think it's possible to really replicate something like heroin or marijuana by using sounds, but countless testimony from users of i-doser say that the effects can be very dramatic (spacing out, extreme relaxation, strange muscle contractions, audio-visual hallucinations, etc).

I'm tempted to try it, but as mentioned, I'm highly skeptical. The software download comes with two free "doses" but the rest all cost money. Even if it does have some merit, I don't think I'd ever spend money on it.


Ummmm...no!

There is nothing like the real thing. I do not recommend this at all.
It reminds me of a similar company that touted similar claims. For $25 you could relax on a table that massaged you while listening to Pink Floyd and watching a virtual world through virtual eye-glasses. Bah!

Unfortunately, there is no replacement for MJ. Heroin? Well, I have no idea...

In the end, it's simply not worth it,