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Typing Dysgraphia


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#1 pamela

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 02:20 PM

For quite some time now, I have been trying to identify the cause and traits associated with typing dysgraphia. Most people I know, when they misspell word such as "thye" they typically refer to themselves as dyslexic. Here is the break down

Dysgraphia (or agraphia) is a deficiency in the ability to write, regardless of the ability to read, not due to intellectual impairment

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Dysgraphia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dyslexia is a learning disability that manifests itself primarily as a difficulty with written language, particularly with reading. It is separate and distinct from reading difficulties resulting from other causes, such as a non-neurological deficiency with vision or hearing, or from poor or inadequate reading instruction.Evidence suggests that dyslexia results from differences in how brain processes written and spoken language. Although dyslexia is thought to be the result of a neurological difference, it is not an intellectual disability. Dyslexia is diagnosed in people of all levels of intelligence.


Dyslexia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Now, when i was a child learing how to write, i would spell my name as Map:). Infact to this day, my brother calls me mapela! I was not diagnosed as dyslexic, I just needed practice, but those were different days. Over the years, I have had no problem writing or reading, but i do have an aptitude for reading backwards and misspelled words and even words with letters removed, with great ease. However, when it comes to typing, common words such as and, they, etc, the letters are inverted. I refuse to use spell check, and force myself to type correctly. Does any one have any information on why this occurs? And more specifically from a neurological standpoint?

#2 CraigD

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 05:31 PM

I’ve very little experience with the study or treatment of either dyslexia or dysgraphia, but from the post #1’s wikipedia links, get the impression that dysgraphia is considered a disorder of pen or pencil writing only, not keyboarding. One of the possible treatments for dysgraphia listed is, paraphrasing, to write less and type more. Thus I suspect that “typing disgraphia” is an oxymoron (a contradiction of terms).

Nearly everyone, I think, occasionally makes letter transposition errors when typing. As best I can tell, these mistakes are usually due to faulty keyboarding technique, mostly a lack of regular rhythm. Prior to the appearance of modern computer keyboards, and before that, electric typewriters with mechanical interlocks to prevent jamming due to near simultaneous pressing of keys, typists were less prone to this problem than we are today, because of the need to maintain an even rhythm to prevent mechanical typehead jams. As a result, we’ve become, I think say, sloppier typists than those of a couple of generations ago.

In my personal experience, I find that I make a greater number of letter transposition errors when I’m trying to type near the limits of my maximum speed. A useful technique for reducing them, I’ve found, is to somewhat unconsciously “find my max”, then back off perhaps 5% from it. By slowing down slightly, the improved rhythm, and perhaps other factors, seems to me to actually result in an increase in typing speed. This “slow down and smooth out to speed up” technique seems a very general one, applicable to everything from mechanical work to martial arts, what I sometimes call a part of the , or Zen, of many things.

#3 pamela

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 05:56 PM

well, for lack of better terms, is why i called it typing dysgraphia. It is in writing not reading, but only when typing. I am a very fast typist and do not have a problem with key placement.Even when i type at a slower speed, without fail, i continue to do it. Now, if i look at the keys, then i do not make an error;) I just find it very strange and wonder if it stems from a neurological glitch. Heck, in just typing this paragraph alone, i have already made 4 errors.:hihi: What should come as an easy flow from thought to action seems to misfire.There have been times when i had to literally retype a word 4 times before it was correct. Now that is the extreme, but surely signifies something odd to me.

#4 Moontanman

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 07:33 PM

I'm not sure why but when i type i almost Always type "always" as alwasy "the" as hte or "they" as thye I have also accidentally told my spell checker that these spellings are correct so i have to go back and find each misspelling and correct it. I've always figured it was just sloppy typing on my part and not a perceptual problem but I have been wrong before.

#5 pamela

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 07:40 PM

from moon
I'm not sure why but when i type i almost Always type "always" as alwasy "the" as hte or "they" as thye I have also accidentally told my spell checker that these spellings are correct so i have to go back and find each misspelling and correct it. I've always figured it was just sloppy typing on my part and not a perceptual problem but I have been wrong before.


i am not thinking perceptual, more along the lines of faulty sequencing. In my case, this could be the direct result of damage to the parietal lobe. However after googling "typing dyslexia" apparently many people are questioning this problem

#6 CraigD

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 10:04 PM

Even when i type at a slower speed, without fail, i continue to do it.

That is rather strange. For me, slowing down – not just my word rate, but the sub-second interval between keystrokes - pretty much drops my letter transposition error rate to zero.

My impression, supported by the little I’ve read about typing transposition errors, is that they are due in large part to “flight time” mixups involving the motor nerves, muscles, and digits as a whole of your fingers, so that while your brain’s language centers commands T H E, and your motor system sets the appropriate fingers in motion, the middle left E finger “beats” the right index H, producing T E H instead, so slowing down should eliminate the error.

Now, if i look at the keys, then i do not make an error;)

What happens when you look at your screen, watching each letter as it appears? According to the wikipedia article I linked above, this is one of the recommended cures for keyboarding errors in general.

I’d also be curious to know if it happens when you use a thumbpad, or type with a single finger.

I just find it very strange and wonder if it stems from a neurological glitch.

I’m sticking with my amateur clinician guess that it’s not neurological, but a technique problem, an optimistic diagnosis, as you should be able to train the problem away.

:phones: A few more amateur diagnostic questions: Has this problem become worse recently? Do you have any pain or numbness in your arms or fingers? Any other new injuries or physical problems?

#7 pamela

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 05:59 AM

Here is a rather important piece of information that I failed to mention. It does not occur when copying material only when I am composing.Just for a trick, I am looking at the letters instead of the screen and I still am doing it!:phones: I can type with 98 percent accuracy when copying material, only errors found are in punctuation and non pluralization.

What happens when you look at your screen, watching each letter as it appears? According to the wikipedia article I linked above, this is one of the recommended cures for keyboarding errors in general.

I am watching the screen but do not recognize the error until I proof the completed work.

I’d also be curious to know if it happens when you use a thumbpad, or type with a single finger

i dont know, let ne try it right now
only errors i see is that i missed to the left for the "m" needed and did not attempt the apostrophe. I do have to force myself to capitalize, often times I feel that the conversation is casual and hence I do not use it

I’m sticking with my amateur clinician guess that it’s not neurological, but a technique problem, an optimistic diagnosis, as you should be able to train the problem away

you could be right, and I am sure over time I can produce a better accuracy when composing. I guess I am looking for the why

few more amateur diagnostic questions: Has this problem become worse recently? Do you have any pain or numbness in your arms or fingers? Any other new injuries or physical problems?

no pain or numbness or physical problems. I have had several major concussions over the years, but I wasn't typing on a regular basis prior to the damage. I cannot say for sure that this is a result there of but am leaning towards that assumption. Interesting to note, when I am frustrated or agitated, sometimes my speech is askew. Infact, I may be unaware until it is pointed out.

#8 C1ay

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 07:12 AM

From my inbox :phones:

I cnduo't bvleiee taht I culod aulaclty uesdtannrd waht I was rdnaieg. Unisg the icndeblire pweor of the hmuan mnid, aocdcrnig to rseecrah at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno't mttaer in waht oderr the lterets in a wrod are, the olny irpoamtnt tihng is taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rhgit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it whoutit a pboerlm. Tihs is bucseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey ltteer by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Aaznmig, huh? Yaeh and I awlyas tghhuot slelinpg was ipmorantt!

#9 pamela

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 12:42 PM

haha! and i have absolutely no problem reading that either!:)